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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Kabab Dün. see Seven Transmissions [RY]

Kabgye Deshek Düpa (bka' brgyad bde gshegs 'dus pa) [LW1] [RY]

Kabgye Deshek Düpa [LWx] [RY]

Kacho (mkha' spyod). The accomplishment of being able to go to a celestial realm. [RY]

Kachö Wangpo (Shamar II): 1350-1405 [MR]

KADAG RANGJUNG RANGSHAR (ka dag rang byung rang shar). The title of one of the five volumes contained in Gongpa Sangtal. Kadag Rangjung Rangshar means 'self-existing and self-manifest primordial purity.'[AL] [RY]

Kadam (bka' gdams) [LW1] [RY]

Kadam / The bKa'-gdams was the first of the gsar ma, or new, schools, and was based on the teachings of Atisha (10th -11th century), the great Buddhist teacher from Vikramashila who spent thirteen years in Tibet. Three lineages branched from Atisha's teaching, carried by three of Atisha's disciples; Khu ston Shes rab brtson 'grus, rNgog, and 'Brom ston, who established the structure of the bKa' gdams school. The bKa' gdams pa teachings were continued by Po to pa Rin chen gsal (11th century) and Blo gros grags pa. The bKa' gdams pa were noted for the rigor of their Vinaya practice and for the study of Prajnaparamita and Madhyamika Shastras. Their teachings were later assimilated by other schools, especially by the bKa' rgyud and dGe lugs schools. [RY]

Kadampa (bka' gdams pa). The lineage of teachings bought to Tibet by the great Indian master Atisha. [RY]

Kadey Zurpa (bka' sde zur pa) [LW1] [RY]

Kadey Zurpa; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Kadue Chökyi Gyamtso, the Dharma Ocean Embodying All Teachings. [Daki] [RY]

Kagye Desheg Dupa, a cycle of teachings focusing on the Eight Heruka Sadhanas. [Daki] [RY]

Kagye Deshek Kundu. [RY]

Kagye. [RY]

Kagyü (bka' brgyud) [LW1] [RY]

Kagyü (bka' brgyud). The lineage of teachings brought to Tibet by Lord Marpa, received from the dharmakaya buddha Vajradhara by the Indian siddha Tilopa, Saraha, and others. Transmitted by Naropa and Maitripa to the Tibetan translator Marpa, the lineage was passed on to Milarepa, Gampopa, Karmapa and others. The main emphasis is on the path of means which is the Six doctrines of Naropa, and the path of liberation which is the Mahamudra instructions of Maitripa. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Kagyu (bka' brgyud). The teachings received from the dharmakaya buddha Vajradhara by the Indian siddha Tilopa, Saraha, and others. Transmitted by Naropa and Maitripa to the Tibetan translator Marpa, the lineage was gradually passed on to Milarepa, Gampopa, Karmapa and others. The main emphasis is on the path of means which is the Six Yogas of Naropa, and the path of liberation which is the Mahamudra instructions of Maitripa. In addition to these teachings, Gampopa also received the Kadampa teachings on mind-training brought to Tibet by Lord Atisha which he fused into one system now renowned as the Dakpo Kagyu. It is from the chief disciples of Lord Gampopa that the four great and eight lesser lineages trace their sources. For more details, read Rain of Wisdom and The Life of Marpa, the Translator, both Shambhala Publications. [RY]

Kagyu (bka' brgyud). The 'transmission of the teachings.' One of the Eight Practice Lineages which originated from Lord Marpa. [RY]

Kagyu / The bKa' rgyud school was founded by Marpa (10th-11th century), the great yogi and translator who was the disciple of the Mahasiddhas Maitri-pa and Naropa. His own disciple, Mi la ras pa, was the teacher of Ras chung pa and sGam po pa. From these two disciples came a number of flourishing subschools such as the 'Brug pa and Karma bKa' rgyud. The bKa' rgyud traditions emphasize devotional and yogic practices and have produced numerous siddhas. [RY]

Kagyü Ngakdzö (bka' brgyud sngags mdzod). On of the Five Treasuries of Jamgön Kongtrül containing the chief Kagyü empowerments. [RY]

Kagyu Ngakdzo. [RY]

Kagyu Trinlay Shingta. The 6th Drukchen the holder of the Drukpa Kagyu lineage. ('brug chen) [Peter Roberts]

Kagyupa (bka' brgyud pa). The lineage of teachings brought to Tibet by Lord Marpa. [RY]

Kagyupa / bKa' brgyud pa - Tibetan school founded by Marpa in eleventh century [RY]

Kah-thog - Early rNying-ma monastery; restored in seventeenth century. [Tarthang]

Kailasa - Sacred mountain in western Tibet; known in Tibetan as Ti-se. [Tarthang]

Kailash - Sacred mountain in western Tibet; known in Tibetan as Ti se [RY]

Kailash (ti se). Sacred mountain in western Tibet; also known as Mount Tisey. [ZL] [RY]

Kakhorda (byad). 'A kind of evil spirit, often associated with vetalas' [RY]

Kakhyab Dorje; [LWx] [RY]

Kalachakra (dus kyi 'khor lo). A tantra and a Vajrayana system taught by Buddha Shakyamuni himself. [RY]

Kalachakra (dus kyi 'khor lo). 'Wheel of Time.' A tantra and a Vajrayana system taught by Buddha Shakyamuni himself, showing the interrelationship between the phenomenal world, the physical body and the mind. [ZL] [RY]

Kalachakra Tantra [LW1] [RY]

Kalachakra Tantra. [RY]

Kalachakra Tantra; quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Kalacharya. [Daki] [RY]

kalapinga [LW1] [RY]

Kalavinka, fem. (ka la bing ka ma). the Indian cuckoo, to whose sweet song the Buddha's voice is often compared. [RY]

Kalden Drendsey (skal ldan 'dren mdzad). One of the 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Kalden Rangdrol (skal ldan rang grol), Shabkar's chief disciple also known as Lhundrup Rigdzin (lhun grub rig 'dzin). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Kalön Trimön is Krimön Dorje Tsering (khri smon rdo rje tshe ring), who was minister from 1801 to 1813 (see Petech, 1973, p.231). The Father and Son, and the emperor, the Guardian of the Skies, are respectively Dalai Lama, the Panchen Lama, and the Manchu ruler. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Kalpa - An immeasurably long period of time, referred to in Buddhist cosmology [RY]

Kalpa - An immeasurably long period of time, referred to in Buddhist cosmology. [Tarthang]

Kalpa (bskal pa). A great time span. [RY]

kalpa An extremely long aeon, sometimes reckoned at 4,320 million years. [Rain of Wisdom]

Kalu Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Kama (bka' ma), among the seven transmissions; Oral Transmission [LW1] [RY]

Kama (bka' ma). The Oral Lineage of the Nyingma School, the body of teachings translated chiefly during the period of Guru Rinpoche's stay in Tibet and transmitted from master to student, until the present day. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Kama (bka' ma). The Oral Lineage of the Nyingma School, transmitted from master to student, of the body of teachings translated chiefly during the period of Guru Rinpoche's stay in Tibet. / Kama / bka' ma - a vast collection of rnying ma Tantras that have had a continuous transmission. Three sections, mdo, sgyu, and sems, form the theoretical and philosophical basis of the inner tantras. The bka' ma was transmitted especially through Padmasambhava, Shri Singha, Vimalamitra, and Vairotsana. gnyags Jnanakumara, gnubs chen sangs rgyas ye shes, and the Three Zur continued the line of transmission. In the fourteenth century, Klong chen pa greatly contributed to the bka' ma tradition, systematizing and transmitting the Atiyoga teachings; gter bdag gling pa, the great ster ston, also held the entire bka' ma tradition, and together with his brother lo che dharmashri, revived and promulgated these teachings during the seventeenth century. / [RY]

Kama [LW1] [RY]

Kama and Terma (bka' ma, gter ma). See Kama and Terma individually. / [RY]

Kama and Terma; [LWx] [RY]

Kama, Terma and Vision: ring brgyud bka' ma;, nye brgyud gter ma;, and zab mo dag snang;: The three main streams of transmission in the Nyingma Lineage. The first one is the "long lineage" of the canonical scriptures, which has been transmitted in an uninterrupted way from master to disciple since Guru Padmasambhava and before. The second one is the 'short' or "direct lineage" of the revealed treasures concealed by Guru Padmasambhava for the sake of future generations, and represents the quintessence of the bka' ma. The third one is the "profound pure visions" which adds to the revealed treasure that Guru Padmasambhava appears to the gter ston (the visionary who is predestined to reveal these teachings) and speak to him, as in a meeting of person to person. [MR] / [RY]

Kama, Terma, and Pure Vision (bka' gter dag snang gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Kama, Terma, and Pure Vision [LWx] [RY]

Kama;, (bka' ma). The long oral transmission, which has come down unbroken since the time of Guru Rinpoche. It contains the main practices, initiations, instructions and commentaries of the Nyingma tradition. It was first assembled into a collection of teachings by Minling Terchen Gyurme Dorje, also known as Rigdzin Terdag Lingpa (rig 'dzin gter bdag gling pa;, 1646-1714)), the great Tertön and founder of Mindrolling (smin grol gling), and has been transmitted as such down our to own times. It is referred to as the long lineage, in comparison with the short, or direct, lineage of the Termas (see above). [MR]

Kama;, (bka' ma). The long oral transmission, which has come down unbroken since the time of Guru Rinpoche. It contains the main practices, initiations, instructions and commentaries of the Nyingma tradition. It was first assembled into a collection of teachings by Minling Terchen Gyurmey Dorje, also known as Rigdzin Terdag Lingpa (rig-'dzin gter-bdag gling-pa;, 1646-1714)), the great Tertön and founder of Mindrolling (smin grol gling), and has been transmitted as such down our to own times. It is referred to as the long lineage, in comparison with the short, or direct, lineage of the Termas (see above). [MR]. JKLT: When in danger of becoming extinct, the scriptures of the Kama tradition were collected in eight volumes, through the efforts of Terdag Lingpa, Dharma Shri, and Dordrag Rigdzin Pema Trinley, and then carved into woodblocks at *Ru dam o rgyan bsam gtan gling* by Khedrup Shenphen Thaye (mkhas grub gzhan phan mtha' yas), a major illuminator of the teachings of the Eraly Translations. [RY]

Kamadhatu - The realm of desire; the everyday world in which we live [RY]

Kamadhatu - The realm of desire; the everyday world in which we live. [Tarthang]

Kamalashila - Disciple of Shantarakshita who represented the Indian position in decisive eighth century debate at bSam yas [RY]

Kamalashila (Skt.) Disciple of Shantarakshita who represented the Indian position in a decisive eighth century debate at Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Kamalashila [LW1] [RY]

Kamalashila [LWx] [RY]

kamaloka gods - celestial beings (deva) dwelling within the kamaloka, the realm of desire. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Kamarupa. [Daki] [RY]

Kamtsang [LW1] [RY]

Kamtsang; [LWx] [RY]

Kancha. [Daki] [RY]

K'ang-hsi - Eighteenth century Manchu emperor of the Yuan dynasty; patron of the Dharma who sponsored a printing of the Canon [RY]

Kangyur (bka' 'gyur), often pron. "Kanjur". 'The Translated Word (of the Buddha)', the Tibetan canon of scriptures, comprising the Vinaya, several collections of sutras, and the Tantras. [RY]

Kangyur (bka' 'gyur). The "Translated Words" of Buddha Shakyamuni. The first part of the Tibetan Buddhist canon. Consists of more than one hundred volumes of scriptures. [RY]

Kangyur / bKa' 'gyur - The words and teachings of the Buddha: the first division of the Tibetan Canon [RY]

Kangyur [LW1] [RY]

Kangyur Lhakhang - A temple dedicated to the Kangyur (bka' 'gyur), the scriptures containing the sermons spoken by the Buddha and gathered by his disciples. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Kangyur; [LWx] [RY]

kanishta ('og min), literally "which is not below," the Unexcelled Buddhafield. One recognizes several kinds of 'og min; see the commentary on Jigme Lingpa's Treasury of Spiritual Qualities (yon tan mdzod) by Khenpo Yonten Gyatso, hereafter abbreviated as YZ, vol.40, pp. 742-3. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Kaniska - Greatest king of the Kusanas; usually regarded in the northern tradition as the patron of the Third Council [RY]

Kaniska - Greatest king of the Kusanas; usually regarded in the northern tradition as the patron of the Third Council. [Tarthang]

Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery (bka' snying bshad sgrub gling). Tulku Chökyi Nyima Rinpoche's monastery in Boudhanath, Nepal. The name means 'sanctuary for Kagyu and Nyingma teaching and practice.' [RY]

Ka-Nying Shedrup Ling Monastery [LW1] [RY]

Kapala (thod pa). A skull cup. [RY]

Kapilavastu - The capital city of the Sakyas, vhere Sakvamuni Buddha lived until the age of twenty-nine. [Tarthang]

Kapilavastu - The capital city of the Shakyas, where Shakyamuni Buddha lived until the age of twenty-nine [RY]

Karak Gomchung (kha rag sgom chung 10th-11th cent.) was the perfect example of the renunciate who has given up all activities other than spiritual practice. Constantly contemplating the imminence of his own death, he would not even bother to remove the thorn bushes blocking the entrance of his cave, thinking what a waste of time this would have been if he were to die that same day. He was renowned for his limitless compassion. He was a disciple of Geshe Gonpa (dge bshes dgon pa), and among his own disciples were Ngultön (rngul ston) and Dharma Kyap (dharma skyabs). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Karli - Site of major Buddhist cave temples [RY]

Karli - Site of major Buddhist cave temples. [Tarthang]

Karling Shitro (kar gling zhi khro): JKLT: Corresponds to *dong sprugs rigs bsdus. Discovered by the siddha Karma Lingpa, a manifestation of the lotsava Cho-ro Lui Gyaltsen, at *sgam pa gdar gyi ri bo; endowed with inconceiavble activity; full title: *zhi khro dgongs pa rang grol. [RY]

Karma - Voluntary action, producing consequences that determine the conditions and circumstances of sentient beings [RY]

Karma - Voluntary action, producing consequences that determine the conditions and circumstances of sentient beings. [Tarthang]

Karma (karman, las). In skt the word is wider (see Action), but in English it means a willed action of body, speech and mind, and the impression or seed this leaves on one's personal continuum, which must eventually ripen and produce a result. [RY]

Karma (las) lit. 'action'; its wider meaning encompasses the causal connections between actions and their consequences. [RY]

Karma (las). The unerring law that virtuous actions yield virtuous results etc. [RY]

Karma (las). The unerring law that virtuous actions yield virtuous results, etc. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Karma (las). The unerring law that virtuous actions yield virtuous results, etc. Voluntary action of thought, word, and deed, the effect of which determine the rebirths and experiences of individual sentient beings. [ZL] [RY]

karma (las); four black deeds; four black deeds; four factors of a misdeed; four types of impelling and completing, performed and accumulated; four types of verbal misdeeds; four white deeds; ten nonvirtues; ten virtuous actions; three kinds of karmic action; three types of mental misdeeds; three types of physical misdeeds; white or black karmic deeds [LW1] [RY]

Karma {las}. The actual meaning is action but it generally refers to the result of past actions. [RY]

Karma Chagme Raga Assia (Ka rma chags med rag A sya): 1613-1678. [MR]

Karma Chagme Raga Assia; (Ka rma chags med ra ga a sya;, 1613-1678,) a great saint and tertön, who belongs both to the Nyingma and Kagyu traditions. His writings, particularly his instructions for retreat practice (ri chos), have been, and are, a source of inspiration to many practitioners. He was an emanation of Guru Rinpoche's disciple Luyi Gyaltsen [MR]

Karma Chagme Raga Asya (ka rma chags med ra ga asya, 1613-78), an inspired writer and visionary master who belonged to both the Nyingma and Kagyu traditions. He was said to be an emanation of Guru Padmasambhava's disciple Luyi Gyaltsen. His prayer for taking rebirth in Dewachen (bde ba can smon lam) is one of the prayers most commonly recited by Tibetans. It is said that Karma Chagme's writings bear special blessings, because in most cases he received permission to compose them in visions of his tutelary deities (yi dam). See GC, Vol.3, pp. 347 ff. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Karma Chagmey [LWx] [RY]

Karma Chagmey. See Chagmey Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Karma family (las kyi rigs). One of the five families. [RY]

Karma Gön [LW1] [RY]

Karma Gön; [LWx] [RY]

Karma Guru Ngakyi Wangpo (ka rma gu ru ngag gi dbang po). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Karma Kagyü (karma bka' brgyud) [LW1] [RY]

karma krodha [LW1] [RY]

karma krodha [LWx] [RY]

Karma Lingpa: 1326-? [MR]

Karma Lingpa: 1326-? [MR] Incarnation of Chog-ro Lui Gyaltsen. Discoverer of Karling Shi-tro [more info: Rinchen Terdzö GA/NGA 38-, 58-] [RY]

Karma Mipham Gönpo (karma mi pham mgon po). See Mipham Gönpo.[EMP] [RY]

Karma Ngawang Samten Yeshe Gyamtso (kar ma ngag dbang bsam gtan ye shes rgya mtsho). He is also known as Ngaktrin Rinpoche or Samten Gyatso, the root guru of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. [RY]

Karma Nyingtig (karma snying thig). [EMP] [RY]

Karma Pakshi - Second Karmapa; exercised considerable influence among Mongol rulers in the thirteenth century [RY]

KARMA PAKSHI (karma pakshi). (1204-1283). The second in the line of Karmapa incarnations and is regarded as the first recognized Tibetan tulku. The name Pakshi is Mongolian for 'master,' a title he became renowned under after being given a high religious position by the Mongolian emperor. Among his disciples is the great siddha Orgyenpa Rinchen Pal (1230-1309). [AL] [RY]

Karma Pakshi, Karmapa II: 1206-1283 [MR]

Karma Paksi - Second Karma-pa; exercised considerable influence among Mongol rulers in the thirteenth century. [Tarthang]

Karma Urgyen Mingyur. [RY]

Karma Vihara of Akanistha ('og min ka rma'i gtsug lag khang) An epithet of Tsurphu, the monastery of the Karmapa. [Rain of Wisdom]

karma. The unerring law that virtuous actions yield virtuous results, etc. Voluntary action of thought, word, and deed, the effect of which determine the rebirths and experiences of individual sentient beings.[Primer] [RY]

karma; detailed expl.; four black deeds; four black deeds, expl.; four factors of a misdeed, expl.; four types of impelling and completing, performed and accumulated; four types of verbal misdeeds; four white deeds; ten nonvirtues; ten virtuous actions; three types of mental misdeeds; three types of physical misdeeds; white or black karmic deeds [LWx] [RY]

Karma-mudra (las kyi phyag rgya). One of the four mudras. [RY]

karma-mudra [LW1] [RY]

karma-mudra [LWx] [RY]

Karmapa - bKa' brgyud pa incarnation lineage founded in the twelfth century by Dus gsum mkhyen pa [RY]

Karma-pa - bKa'-brgyud-pa incarnation lineage founded in the twelfth century by Dus-gsum mkhyen-pa. [Tarthang]

Karmapa (kar ma pa). The great master and chief figure of the Karma Kagyu school. [RY]

Karmapa (karma pa) [LW1] [RY]

Karmapa Khakhyab Dorje [LW1] [RY]

Karmapa Rangjung Dorje (1284-1334) The third holder of the title Karmapa, he was a great siddha and scholar and a propagator of both the Mahamudra and Dzogchen teachings to such an extent that he is also counted among the lineage gurus in the Nyingma tradition. [RY]

Karmapa Rangjung Dorje, Karmapa III: 1284-1339 [MR] 1331: invited by the chinese emperor to court. received by the prince ratna shrI. [RY]

Karmapa Rangjung Rigpey Dorje [LW1] [RY]

Karmapa Rolpai Dorje (karma pa rol pa'i rdo rje, 1340-83), the 4th Karmapa. See Karma Trinley (1978). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Karmapa Rolpai Dorje, Karmapa IV: 1340-1383 [MR]

Karmapa Tekchok Dorje [LW1] [RY]

Karmapa Thekchok Dorje. [RY]

Karmapa Wangchuk Dorje (karma pa 09 dbang phyug rdo rje ) (b.1556, d.1602/1603). Known for his Mahamudra explanation, Ocean of Certainty. [RY]

Karmapa, the 15th (kar ma pa bco lnga pa). See 'Khakyab Dorje.' [RY]

Karmapa, the 3rd (kar ma pa gsum pa). See 'Rangjung Dorje.' [RY]

Karmapa. The great master and chief figure of the Karma Kagyu school.[Primer] [RY]

Karmas and kleshas (las dang nyon mongs pa). These two comprise the truth of origin among the four noble truths. [RY]

K continued


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

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--Richard 12:45, 12 August 2008 (EDT)