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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Mahayana - The Great Vehicle of Realization, followed by all Buddhas [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po). The 'Great Vehicle' - the way of a Bodhisattva, and the schools that emphasize it in their teaching. [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po). 'Greater vehicle.' When using the term 'greater and lesser vehicles,' Mahayana and Hinayana,' Mahayana includes the tantric vehicles while Hinayana is comprised of the teachings for shravakas and pratyekabuddhas. The connotation of 'greater' or 'lesser' refers to the scope of aspiration, the methods applied and the depth of insight. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po). 'Greater vehicle.' When using the term 'greater and lesser vehicles,' Mahayana and Hinayana, Mahayana includes the tantric vehicles while Hinayana is comprised of the teachings for shravakas and pratyekabuddhas. The connotation of 'greater' or 'lesser' refers to the scope of aspiration, the methods applied and the depth of insight. Central to Mahayana practice is the bodhisattva vow to liberate all sentient beings through means and knowledge, compassion and insight into emptiness. Mahayana's two divisions are known as Mind-Only and Middle Way. The sevenfold greatness of Mahayana mentioned in Maitreya's Ornament of the Sutras are explained by Jamgön Kongtrül in his All-encompassing Knowledge: "The greatness of focus on the immense collection of Mahayana teachings, the greatness of the means of accomplishing the welfare of both self and others, the greatness of wisdom that realizes the twofold egolessness, the greatness of diligent endeavor for three incalculable aeons, the greatness of skillful means such as not abandoning samsaric existence and enacting the seven unvirtuous actions of body and speech without disturbing emotions, the greatness of true accomplishment of the ten strengths, the fourfold fearlessness, and the unique qualities of the awakened ones, and the greatness of activity that is spontaneous and unceasing."[AL] [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po). The vehicle of bodhisattvas striving for perfect enlightenment for the sake of all beings. For a detailed explanation, see Maitreya's Abhisamayalamkara or Jewel Ornament of Liberation. [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po). The vehicle of bodhisattvas striving for perfect enlightenment for the sake of liberating all sentient beings. Mahayana has two aspects: Sutra emphasizing the extensive teachings and Mantra emphasizing the profound. For a detailed explanation of Sutrayana, see Maitreya's Abhisamayalamkara or Gampopa's Jewel Ornament of Liberation. [RY]

Mahayana (theg pa chen po); difference from Hinayana; listing the sevenfold greatness; the result; two divisions of [LW1] [RY]

Mahayana {theg pa chen po}. Greater Vehicle. The Mahayana practitioner is motivated by the altruistic intention to liberate others from suffering and lead them to Buddhahood. [RY]

Mahayana sutras (theg pa chen po'i mdo). [RY]

Mahayana teachings (theg pa chen po'i chos). The Buddha's teachings comprised of the second and third turning of the wheel of Dharma as well as the commentaries upon them by the great scholars of India and Tibet. [RY]

Mahayana vow See bodhisattva. [Rain of Wisdom]

Mahayana; difference from Hinayana; listing the sevenfold greatness; the result; two divisions of [LWx] [RY]

Mahayanasutralankara; of Asanga; Ed. and translation by J.W. De Jong, Paris, 19 (Buddhica, Premiere Serie: Memoires, t. IX). [MR]

Mahayoga - Second of the three inner Tantras of the rNying ma tradition [RY]

Mahayoga - Second of the three inner Tantras of the rNying-ma tradition. [Tarthang]

Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor) means great yoga [RY]

Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor); approach and accomplishment; as Father Tantra; details of; Eight Sadhana Teachings; meaning of; meaning of Wisdom Essence; [LWx] [RY]

Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor); approach and accomplishment; Father Tantra; listing of Eight Sadhana Teachings; literal meaning; meaning of Wisdom Essence [LW1] [RY]

Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po) [LW1] [RY]

Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'three inner tantras.' It empasizes the development stage. [RY]

Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'Three Inner Tantras.' Mahayoga as scripture is divided into two parts: Tantra Section and Sadhana Section. The Tantra Section consists of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras while the Sadhana Section is comprised of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Jamgön Kongtrül says in his Treasury of Knowledge: "Mahayoga emphasizes means (upaya), the development stage, and the view that liberation is attained through growing accustomed to the insight into the nature of the indivisibility of the superior two truths." The superior two truths in Mahayoga are purity and equality: The pure natures of the aggregates, elements and sense factors are the male and female buddhas and bodhisattvas. At the same time, everything that appears and exists is of the equal nature of emptiness. [ZL] [RY]

Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'Three Inner Tantras.' Mahayoga as scripture is divided into two parts: Tantra Section and Sadhana Section. The Tantra Section consists of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras while the Sadhana Section is comprised of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Jamgön Kongtrül says in his Treasury of Knowledge: "Mahayoga emphasizes means (upaya), the development stage, and the view that liberation is attained through growing accustomed to the insight into the nature of the indivisibility of the superior two truths." The superior two truths in Mahayoga are purity and equality — the pure natures of the aggregates, elements and sense factors are the male and female buddhas and bodhisattvas. At the same time, everything that appears and exists is of the equal nature of emptiness.[AL] [RY]

Mahayoga of the Mahayoga" and so on. They are the Mahayoga of the Mahayoga. The Anuyoga of the Mahayoga. The Atiyoga of the Mahayoga. [Peter Roberts]

Mahayoga; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Maheshvara (dbang phyug chen po). One of the chief Hindu divinities. [RY]

Mahinda - In the Theravadin tradition, the son of Ashoka and leader of the mission that established the Dharma in Sri Lanka [RY]

Mahinda - In the Theravadin tradition, the son of Asoka and leader of the mission that established the Dharma in Sri Lanka. [Tarthang]

Mahoraga (lto 'phye chen po). 'Great serpent', a class of demons. [RY] mahoraga [LW1] [RY]

Main part of practice (nyams len gyi dngos gzhi). Refers to the practice that follows the preliminaries: either yidam practice or, here, the actual practice of Mahamudra or Dzogchen. According to Jigmey Lingpa, 'main part' literally means 'actual basis' in the sense that 'basis' means to have full intellectual comprehension of the practice and 'actual' means to have direct experience of its meaning. [RY]

main temple of Samye, the three stories of which were each built in a different style--Indian, Tibetan, and Khotanese (li yul). [MR-ShabkarNotes]


Maitreya - The coming Buddha, now a Bodhisattva in Tushita heaven; author of the five treatises preserved by Asanga. Sometimes known as - Maitreyanatha [RY]

Maitreya (byams pa) [LW1] [RY]

Maitreya (byams pa), the Loving One. The bodhisattva regent of Buddha Shakyamuni, presently residing in the Tushita heaven until becoming the fifth buddha of this kalpa. [RY]

Maitreya (byams pa). 'The Friendly', n. of a Bodhisattva now residing in Tushita, who is to appear on Earth as the next Universal Buddha. [RY]

Maitreya (byams pa). 'The Loving One.' The bodhisattva regent of Buddha Shakyamuni, presently residing in the Tushita heaven until becoming the fifth buddha of this aeon; author of five treatises preserved by Asanga. [ZL] [RY]

Maitreya {byams pa}. A Bodhisattva who is supposed to be the next Buddha of this aeon. [RY]

Maitreya Temple (byams pa gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Maitreya; quotation by; quote by; [LWx] [RY]

Maitripa (mai tri pa). A great Indian master and one of the teachers of Marpa the Translator. [RY]

Maitripa: (1012-1097) [MR]

Majestic Blazing Retreat Tantra (gzi ldan 'bar ba mtshams kyi rgyud). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Major and minor circles of Tögal (thod rgal gyi thig le thig phran). The details of this should be received through the oral instructions of one's teacher. [RY]

Major and Minor Gathering Tantra (tshogs rgyud che chung). A Mahayoga scripture explaining the ritual of a ganachakra. See also 'feast offering.' [ZL] [RY]

Major and minor marks (mtshan dpe). The thirty-two major and eighty minor marks of excellence that characterize the perfect physical form of a nirmanakaya or sambhogakaya buddha. A universal ruler is also said to possess a resemblance of these marks. [RY]

Major and Minor Nectar Display (bdud rtsi rol pa che chung). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Major and Minor Torma Tantra (gtor lung che chung gi rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Major lie - A lie that can cause a fully-ordained monk to lose his vows is pretending to be a realized person when he is not; also claiming falsely to have had visions of deities, to have miraculous powers, etc.. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Malaya; Peak of [LW1] [RY]

Maldro (mal gro). [ZL] [RY]

Male classes (pho rgyud). One of the three classes of Dharma protectors. [RY]

Maledictory Fierce Mantra (dmod pa drag sngags); transmission of [LW1] [RY]

Maledictory Fierce Mantra (rmod pa drag sngags). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. [ZL] [RY]

Maledictory Fierce Mantra, Möpa, (dmod pa); transmission of [LWx] [RY]

Mamaki. Second of the four Sublime Mothers. [RY]

Mamo (ma mo). 1) See under Mundane Mother Deities. 2) A class of semi-divine beings who sometimes act as protectors of the Dharma. [ZL] [RY]

MAMO (ma mo). Abbreviation of 'Mundane Mother Deities' ('jig rten ma mo). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Female divinities manifested out of dharmadhatu but appearing in ways that correspond to mundane appearances through the interrelationship between the mundane world and the channels, winds, and essences within our body. They have both an ultimate and relative aspect. The chief figure in this mandala is Chemchok Heruka, the wrathful form of Buddha Samantabhadra in the form known as Ngöndzok Gyalpo, the King of True Perfection. [AL] [RY]

Mamo Bötong [LW1] [RY]

Mamo Chidu. [RY]

Manarasovar - Southern Gate of the Thaw (khrus sgo lho) is thus called because this is the last area of the lake to become frozen and is the first to thaw. It normally freezes at the beginning of the twelfth Tibetan month and thaws at the beginning of the third month. The Gelukpa monastery built on that shore took this name (khrus sgo dgon pa). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Manarasowar Sutra (ma dros pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]

Manasarovar - monasteries - There were eight monasteries around Manasarovar, five of which have been rebuilt since 1981: 1) ser ra lung, "Hailstorm Valley," to the east, founded by the great yogin Drigung Dordzin Konchok Gyudzin ('bri gung rdor 'dzin dkon mchog rgyud 'dzin); 2) mnyes 'go, "Started with Pleasure," in the southeast, so called because Atisha was overjoyed when he visited the place, remaining there for a few days. Later Ngorchen Kunga Lhundrup (ngor chen kun dga' lhun grub) had a vision of Guru Padmasambhava there and built a monastery that was subsequently held by the Sakya school; 3) khrus sgo, the "Gate of the Thaw," in the south. See above, note 5; 4) 'go tshugs, "The Initiator," in the southwest, so called because it was there that, after meditating for three months in a cave, Gyalwa Götsangpa began the propagation at Kailash of the Drukpa Kagyu tradition ('brug pa bka' rgyud); 5) byi'u, "Little Bird," in the west, built in the form of the Glorious Copper-colored Mountain (zangs mdog dpal ri) upon a heart-shaped rock. It was blessed by Guru Padmasambhava, who is said to have spent seven days there on his way to Chamara, when leaving Tibet; 6) gser gyi bya skyib, "Golden Bird-shelter," in the north-west, a place said to have been first blessed by the Buddha and his five hundred arhats, afterwards by Drigung Chen-nga Lingpa ('bri gung spyan snga gling pa) and his five hundred great meditators, then by Tsang Nyön Heruka (gtsang smyon he ru ka, 1452-1507) who established a retreat center there; 7) glang sna, "Elephant Trunk," in the north, so called because it was built on a hill shaped like an elephant's trunk. It was founded by two Drigung masters, Drupthob Nyemowa Samten Phuntsok (grub thob snye mo ba bsam gtan phun tshogs) and his reincarnation Kunga Lodrö Nyingpo (kun dga' blo gros snying po); 8) bon ri, "Bön Mountain", in the north-east, a seat of the Gelukpa school. It was founded by the great meditator Khedrup Lobzang Norbu (mkhas grub blo bzang nor bu) on Bönri, the hill which Milarepa had given to Naro Bönchung as a dwelling place after winning the ownership of Mt Kailash in a contest of miracles. See MK, pp. 73-76. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor) lit. 'concentric circle'; a mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [RY]

mandala (dkyil 'khor), literal meaning of; special meaning of [LW1] [RY]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a deity along with its surrounding environment. A mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) A mandala offering is an offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [ZL] [RY]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a deity along with its surrounding environment. A mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) A mandala offering is an offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [AL] [RY]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) An offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of the shrine in a tantric ritual. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor). Literally means 'center and surrounding,' but should be understood according to context. Usually a deity along with its surrounding environment. [RY]

Mandala (dkyil 'khor, 'khor lo, mandal). 'Circle, disk,'esp. the 'circle' composed of a deity and her or his emanations, attendants and environment; also the disk of an entire universe visualized as an offering, and the round plate or tray that serves as physical support for this practice. [RY]

Mandala {dkyil 'khor}. The universe visualized as an offering. During the genration phase it refers to the place where the deities reside, such a the Buddha palace and its surroundings. [RY]

Mandala circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo). A gathering of deities as one mandala. [RY] mandala. Here mandala refers to the rimmed metal disc used for offerings, not to the diagrammatic representation of a deity's palace, which is the more well known use of the word. [Peter Roberts]

mandala; literal meaning of; special meaning of [LWx] [RY]

mandala-chakra. Mandala-chakra, which is described in Tsewang Norbu's commentary as meaning the Ati Yoga. [Peter Roberts]

mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo) [LW1] [RY]

Mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo) means the lower gate of another's body, the phonya path of great bliss. [RY]

mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Mandara, mandarava. The coral tree, Erythrina indica, one of the five trees of paradise, with brilliant scarlet flowers. [RY]

Mandarava (man da ra ba me tog). Princess of Zahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. One of his five main consorts. Her name refers to the coral tree, Erythrina Indica, one of the five trees of paradise, which has brilliant scarlet flowers. She is said to be identical with the dakini Niguma and the yogini by the name Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli, Jamgön Kongtrül says, "Born as the daughter of Vihardhara, the king of Zahor, and Queen Mohauki accompanied by miraculous signs, (and because of her great beauty), many kings from India and China vied to take her as their bride. Nevertheless, she had an unshakable renunciation and entered the gate of the Dharma. Padmasambhava perceived that she was to be his disciple and accepted her as his spiritual consort, but the king, fearing that his bloodline would be contaminated, had the master burned alive. When Padmasambhava showed the miracle of transforming the mass of fire into a lake, the king gained faith and without hesitation offered his entire kingdom and the princess. When the king requested teachings, Padmasambhava showered upon twenty-one disciples the great rain of the Dharma by transmitting the tantras, scriptures and oral instructions of Kadü Chökyi Gyamtso, the Dharma Ocean Embodying All Teachings. Thus, the master established the king and his ministers on the vidyadhara levels. Guru Rinpoche accepted her as his consort and in Maratika, the Cave of Bringing Death to and End, both master and consort displayed the manner of achieving the unified vajra body on the vidyadhara level of life mastery. Mandarava remained in India and has directly and indirectly brought a tremendous benefit to beings. In Tibet, she appeared miraculously at the great Dharma Wheel of Tramdruk where she exchanged symbolic praises and replies with Guru Rinpoche. The details of this are recorded extensively in the Padma Kathang. An independent life story of Mandarava is found in the collected writings of Orgyen Lingpa. Mandarava was a wisdom dakini among whose different names and manifestations are counted the yogini Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments, (Mirükyi Gyenchen), at the time of Lord Marpa, Risülkyi Naljorma at the time of Nyen Lotsawa, and Drubpey Gyalmo at the time of Rechungpa. Mandarava is also accepted as being Chushingi Nyemachen, the consort of Maitripa, as well as the dakini Niguma. Her compassionate emanations and her blessings are beyond any doubt and since she attained the indestructible rainbow body she is surely present (in the world) right now." [AL] [RY]

Mandarava [LWx] [RY]

Mandarava Flower 1. (man da ra ba me tog). Princess of Zahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. One of his five main consorts. Her name refers to the coral tree, Erythrina Indica, one of the five trees of paradise, which has brilliant scarlet flowers. She is said to be identical with the dakini Niguma and the yogini by the name Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli (p. 352), Jamgön Kongtrül says, "Born as the daughter of Vihardhara, the king of Zahor, and Queen Mohauki accompanied by miraculous signs, (and because of her great beauty), many kings from India and China vied to take her as their bride. Nevertheless, she had an unshakable renunciation and entered the gate of the Dharma. Padmasambhava perceived that she was to be his disciple and accepted her as his spiritual consort, but the king, fearing that his bloodline would be contaminated, had the master burned alive. When Padmasambhava showed the miracle of transforming the mass of fire into a lake, the king gained faith and without hesitation offered his entire kingdom and the princess. When the king requested teachings, Padmasambhava showered upon twenty-one disciples the great rain of the Dharma by transmitting the tantras, scriptures and oral instructions of Kadü Chökyi Gyamtso, the Dharma Ocean Embodying All Teachings. Thus the master established the king and his ministers on the vidyadhara levels. Guru Rinpoche accepted her as his consort and in Maratika, the Cave of Bringing Death to and End, both master and consort displayed the manner of achieving the unified vajra body on the vidyadhara level of life mastery. Mandarava remained in India and has directly and indirectly brought a tremendous benefit to beings. In Tibet, she appeared miraculously at the great Dharma Wheel of Tramdruk where she exchanged symbolic praises and replies with Guru Rinpoche. The details of that are recorded extensively in the Padma Kathang. An independent life story of Mandarava is found in the collected writings of Orgyen Lingpa. Mandarava was a wisdom dakini among whose different names and manifestations are counted the yogini Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments, (Mirükyi Gyenchen), at the time of Lord Marpa, Risülkyi Naljorma at the time of Nyen Lotsawa, and Drubpey Gyalmo at the time of Rechungpa. Mandarava is also accepted as being Chushingi Nyemachen, the consort of Maitripa, as well as the dakini Niguma. Her compassionate emanations and her blessings are beyond any doubt and since she attained the indestructible rainbow body she is surely present (in the world) right now." [ZL] [RY]

Mandarava. Princess of Sahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. [RY] Mangalam (bkra shis shog). "May all be auspicious." [RY]

Mangje Selnang of Bey (sbas mang rje gsal snang). [ZL] [RY]

Mang-yul (mang yul). The area north of the Kathmandu valley, between Trisuli and the present border to Tibet. [ZL] [RY]

Mang-yul between Nepal and Tibet. [Daki] [RY]

Mani chanting - Traditionally, once a year, the whole population of a village and its surroundings would gather and recite together a hundred million mani mantras. i.e. the mantra of Avalokitesvara, om mani padme hum. During this time, a lama would give daily teachings on the Dharma. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mani mantras. [RY]

Manibhadra (nor bzang). A great bodhisattva of a past aeon. [RY]

Manifest Dharmata (chos nyid mngon sum). The first of the four visions in Dzogchen practice. [RY]

Manifold capacity (thugs rje sna tshogs). The capacity for manifesting manifold phenomena and perceptions. See 'eesence, nature, and capacity.' [RY] Manika. [RY]

Ma-ning (ma ning) [LW1] [RY]

Manis {ma ni}. Om Mani Padma Hum Hri. The mantra of Avalokiteshvara {spyan ras gzigs}, the deity of compassion, the most popular deity of Tibet. Though Avalokiteshvara is mentioned as one of the three main Bodhisattvas, according to Vajrayana he is a fully enlightened Buddha. [RY]

Manjughosa ('jam dbyangs). 'The Sweet-voiced', a form of Manjushiri. [RY]

Manjughosa (soft or sweet voiced) A common epithet of Manjushri. [Rain of Wisdom]

Manjugosha. Same as Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. [RY]

Manjugosha. See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]

Manjugosha; alias Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LWx] [RY]

Manjushri ('jam dbyangs) Bodhisattva of Wisdom. Manjushri manifested in Tibet as King Khri srong 'de'u bstan in order to help the Tibetans firmly establish the Dharma. (RY)

Manjushri / Manjusri

Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs) [LW1] [RY]

Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs). One of the eight main bodhisattvas. He is the personification of the perfection of transcendent knowledge. [RY]

Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs). One of the eight main bodhisattvas. He is the personification of the perfection of transcendent knowledge. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri ('jam dpal). n. of a Bodhisattva, who represents particularly Wisdom and is depicted flourishing a blazing wisdom sword in the right hand and holding a lotus that supports a book in the left. He is called 'the Youthful' (kumara (-bhuta), gzhon nu(rgyur pa) because of his everlastingly youthful appearance; the same title is sometimes taken to mean 'Crown Prince'. [RY]

Manjushri (Yamantaka); transmission of [LWx] [RY]

Manjushri {'jam dpal dbyangs}. A tenth level (see bhumis) Bodhisattva who embodies the knowledge and wisdom of all the Buddhas. [RY]

Manjushri Body ('jam dpal sku) [LW1] [RY]

Manjushri Body ('jam dpal sku). The heruka of the Tathagata Body family or the tantric teachings connected to this deity among the 'Eight Sadhana Teachings.' Also known as Yamantaka, the wrathful form of Manjushri. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Heruka ('jam dpal khrag 'thung). Same as Yamantaka. One of the Eight Heruka Sadhanas. [RY]

Manjushri Kumara ('jam dpal gzhon nu). The peaceful aspect of Manjushri. [RY]

Manjushri Namasangirti Tantra Expressed in Songs of Praise ('jam dpal gyi mtshan yang dag par brjod pa bstod pa glur blangs pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga known to all Tibetan Buddhists as Jampal Tsenjö. Translated as Chanting the Names of Manjushri, A. Wayman, Shambhala Publications. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Root Tantra. The Arya Manjushri Mula Tantra ('phags pa 'jam dpal gyi rtsa ba'i rgyud). This is text 543 in the Derge Kangyur and has 36 chapters. It begins on page 105 of volume Na and takes up the rest of the volume. [Peter Roberts]

Manjushri Tantra of Immaculate Wisdom Being ('jam dpal ye shes sems dpa' dri ma med pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Tantra of Sharp Intelligence ('jam dpal shes rab rnon po'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Temple ('jam dpal gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Web-cutting Tantra ('jam dpal drva ba gcod pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Manjushri Yamantaka ('jam dpal gshin rje bshed). The wrathful aspect of Manjushri. One of the eight Heruka Sadhanas. [RY]

Manjushri Yamantaka; transmission of [LW1] [RY]

Manjushri; [LWx] [RY]

Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen) [LW1] [RY]

Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen). An Indian master of the Dzogchen lineage and disciple of Garab Dorje. Same as Jampal Shenyen. [RY]

Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen); mention of [LWx] [RY]

Manjushrimitra 1. ('jam dpal bshes gnyen, pron. Jampal Shenyen). An Indian master in the Dzogchen lineage and the chief disciple of Garab Dorje. In his role as a master in the lineage of the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga, he received the transmission of Yamantaka in the form of the Secret Wrathful Manjushri Tantra and other texts. Manjushrimitra was born in the Magadha district of India and was soon an adept in the general sciences and the conventional topics of Buddhism. After having become the most eminent among five hundred panditas, he received many teachings and empowerments from Garab Dorje, Lalitavajra, and other masters and reached the unified level of enlightenment, indivisible from Manjushri. Yamantaka appeared to him in person, conferred empowerment and transmitted the tantras and oral instructions. Among his chief recipients of this teaching were Hungkara, Padmasambhava, and Hanatela. There seem to have been several masters with this name, but Guru Tashi Tobgyal in his Ocean of Wondrous Sayings to Delight the Learned Ones views them as being magical emanations of the same master. See also Sadhana Section. [ZL] [RY]

Mansion of Complete Victory (rnam par rgyal ba'i khang bzang) is the name of the palace of the celestial beings of the thirty-threefold god-realm. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mansion of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags pho brang) [LW1] [RY]

M continued - M1


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

-A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z -


--Richard 12:51, 12 August 2008 (EDT)