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M continued - M1

M continued - M2


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Milarepa (mi la ras pa) 1040-1123. One of the most famous yogis and poets in Tibetan religious history. Much of the teachings of the Karma Kagyü schools passed through him. For more details read The Life of Milarepa and The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, Shambhala Publications. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

MILAREPA (mi la ras pa). (1040-1123). One of the most famous yogis and poets in Tibetan religious history. Much of the teachings of the Karma Kagyü schools passed through him. For more details read The Life of Milarepa and The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa (Shambhala Publications). His name means 'Cotton-clad Mila.'[AL] [RY]

Milarepa (mi la ras pa). A great yogin and major Kagyu lineage holder. Tibetan master and the chief disciple of Marpa. See the book "The Life of Milarepa" translated by L. Lhalungpa, Shambhala Publications. [RY]

Milarepa / Mi la ras pa - Disciple of Marpa; Tibet's greatest mystic poet [RY]

Milarepa [LW1] [RY]

Milarepa: 1040- 1123 (1052-1135?) [MR]

Milky Lake ('o ma can gyi rgya mtsho) in the south-western direction [RY]

Mind and prana (rlung sems). 'Prana' here is the 'wind of karma,' the current of conceptual thinking, as well as the energy-currents in the body. 'Mind' is the dualistic consciousness of an unenlightened being. These two are closely related. [ZL] [RY]

Mind and Space Sections (sems klong kyi sde). The first two of the three sections of Dzogchen. [RY]

Mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam par shes pa). According to Abhidharma, one of the eight consciousnesses. Its function is to discriminate and label things. [RY]

mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam par shes pa); conceptual (yid shes rtog bcas); definition of; expl.; explanation of two aspects; two aspects of; [LWx] [RY]

mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam shes); definition of; explanation of two aspects; two aspects of [LW1] [RY]

mind consciousness; conceptual (yid shes rtog bcas); [LWx] [RY]

Mind essence (sems ngo). (sems nyid), The nature of mind, synonym for 'buddha nature.' It should be distinguished from 'mind' (sems), which refers to ordinary discursive thinking based on ignorance. 'Mind essence' is the basic space from and within which these thoughts take place. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Mind essence (sems nyid). (sems ngo). The nature of mind. A synonym for 'buddha nature.' [RY]

Mind Lineage of the Victorious Ones (rgyal ba dgongs brgyud). The first of the three lineages of the Nyingma School. Usually, it refers to the transmission from Buddha Samantabhadra to Garab Dorje of teachings beyond words and symbols. [RY]

Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa), Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of India. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. [RY]

Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa), Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of Buddhist philosophy propagated by the great master Asanga and his followers. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra and other scriptures, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. Positively, this view relinquishes the fixation on a solid reality. Negatively, there is still clinging to a truly existing 'mind' within which everything takes place.[AL] [RY]

Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa); definition of name; detailed; expl. view; viewpoint of the noble potential [LW1] [RY]

Mind-Only School of Equal Number Perceiver and Perceived (gzung 'dzin grangs mnyam pa'i sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]

Mind-Only School of Nondual Variety (sna tshogs gnyis med pa'i sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]

Mind-Only School of Nondual Variety (sna tshogs gnyis med sems tsam rnam bden pa) [RY]

Mind-Only School of Split Egg Shell (sgo nga phyed 'tshal sems tsam rnam bden pa) [RY]

Mind-Only. Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of India. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. Positively, this view relinquishes the fixation on a solid reality. Negatively, there is still clinging to a truly existing 'mind' within which everything takes place.[Primer] [RY]

Mind-Only; definition of name; detailed expl.; expl. view; viewpoint of the noble potential [LWx] [RY]

Mind Seat of Chokgyur Lingpa [LW1] [RY]

Mind Section (sems sde). The first of the Three Sections of Dzogchen. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Mind Section (sems sde). The first of the Three Sections of Dzogchen. In this book twenty-five tantras and eighteen major scriptures are mentioned. Most are found in the first three volumes of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Mind Section (sems sde); of Dzogchen [LW1] [RY]

Mind Section of Dzogchen (rdzogs chen sems sde). The first of the three sections of Dzogchen. [RY]

Mind Section; of Dzogchen [LWx] [RY]

Mind sections {sems sde}. Aspect of the Dzogchen tantras. [RY]

MIND TERMA (dgongs gter). A revelation directly within the mind of a great master, without the need for a terma of material substance. The teachings revealed in this way were implanted within the 'indestructible sphere' at the time when the master in a former life was one of Padmasambhava's disciples.[AL] [RY]

Mind Training (blo sbyong). See Lojong. [RY]

mind training (blo sbyong); detailed; tong-len practice [LW1] [RY]

Mind Training on Cutting All Ties of Attachment. This refers to the legs bshad zhen 'khris kun gcod one of the many blo sbyong teachings written by Chen-ngawa Lodrö Gyaltsen (1402-72). See Translator's Introduction, p.xxi. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

mind training; detailed expl.; tong-len practice [LWx] [RY]

Mind Treasure (dgongs gter); among the seven transmissions [LW1] [RY]

Mind Treasure (dgongs gter); among the seven transmissions [LWx] [RY]

Mind treasures (dgongs gter) are termas concealed by Guru Padmasambhava in the mind-stream of the Treasure-discoverer (gter ston). They manifest clearly to the Tertön at the appropriate time. (See Appendix 1). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mind, Sign and Hearing Lineages (dgongs brda snyan brgyud). See Three Lineages. [RY]

Mind, Space and Instruction Sections (sems klong man ngag gi sde gsum). After Garab Dorje established the six million four hundred thousand tantras of Dzogchen in the human world, his chief disciple, Manjushrimitra, arranged these tantras into three categories: the Mind Section emphasizing luminosity, the Space Section emphasizing emptiness, and the Instruction Section emphasizing their inseparability. [RY]

Mind-Attainment Secret-Union Secret-Document Essential-Instructions". Mind-Attainment Secret-Union Secret-Document Essential-Instructions: "Mind-Attainment" in Tibetan is thugs sgrub, and refers to Padmakara practices. This terma is quoted from repeatedly in this instruction-text, though with variations in the title, none of which are listed in Kongtrül's "Treasury of Termas". : "In practicing me, all Buddhas are practiced, Seeing me, all Buddhas are seen, I am the union of the Sugatas." [Peter Roberts]

Mind-Attainment. Mind-Attainment: thugs sgrub. A Padmasambhava practice of the terma tradition. [Peter Roberts]

Mind-essence (sems nyid). The nature of one's mind which is taught to be identical with the essence of all enlightened beings, the sugata garbha. It should be distinguished from 'mind' (sems) which refers to ordinary discursive thinking based on ignorance of the nature of thought. [RY]

Mindfulness (dran pa). Has different connotation according to the different vehicles. Here, it means nondistraction. [RY]

Mindfulness of deliberate attention (rtsol bcas 'du byed kyi dran pa). Artificial or forced mindfulness. [RY]

mind-lineage of the Buddhas. The mind-lineage of the Buddhas, the first part of the transmission of the higher Nyingma teachings, is the direct mind transmission that takes place in the unsurpassable Buddha realm, Akanishta. The transmission is from the Dharmakaya Buddha to Bodhisattvas of complete realisation, who are themselves sambhogakaya deities, who are inseparable from the Dharmakaya. [Peter Roberts]

Mind-only School (sems tsam pa, cittamatra). A Mahayana school of India. [RY]

Mindröl Ling [LW1] [RY]

Mindröl Ling Monastery [LW1] [RY]

Mindrol Ling. [RY]

Mindröl Ling; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Mindröl Norbu Ling [LW1] [RY]

Mindroling (smin grol gling) was founded in 1670, by Terdak Lingpa (see chap.1, note 38) and is one the six principal Nyingma monasteries in Tibet (see Glossary of Enumerations). On the Mindroling tradition see NS, p.825. The throne of Mindroling is traditionally held by successive descendants of Terdak Lingpa. The Jetsunmas are his female descendants, who have always played an important role in the preservation of the teachings. Many of them have been remarkable teachers themselves. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mindroling Gonpa built: 1670 [MR]

mind-stream (rgyud, sems rgyud). [LW1] [RY]

Mind-stream (sems rgyud). The individual continuity of cognition. [RY]

Mind-treasure. [RY]

Ming (chinese) 1360-1644. [RY]

Minling Chung Rinpoche. [RY]

Minling Dorsem; terma given to Rigdzin Terdag Lingpa at ngam shod gnam lcags brag by Ekajati in person. Also called:zhi ba rdo rje dbyings gsang chen rigs gcig dpal rdo rje sems dpa' thugs kyi sgrub pa. [more info: Terdzö KHA/KHA 66-68] Placed as the first sadhana in the Rinchen Terdzö since Vajrasattva is the pervader of all mandalas. [RY]

Minling Lochen Dharma Shri: 1654-1717 [MR]

Minling Terchen Terdag Lingpa, Gyurme Dorje (smin gling gter chen gter bdag gling pa 'gyur med rdo rje): 1646-1714. [MR]

Minling Terchen Terdak Lingpa, Gyurme Dorje (smin gling gter chen gter bdag gling pa 'gyur med rdo rje, 1646-1714). A disciple as well as a teacher of the fifth Dalai Lama, Terdak Lingpa revealed major termas, compiled the canonical scriptures of the Nyingma tradition (rnying ma bka' ma), and, with his brother Minling Lochen Dharma Shri (smin gling lo chen dharma sri, 1654-1718), played a major role in ensuring the continuity of the exegetical tradition of the Guhyagarbha Tantra (Tantra of the Secret Quintessence, NGB, vol. 14, no. 187). See NS, pp. 825-34. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Minling Trichen. [RY]

Mipham Gönpo (mi pham mgon po). Identical to Bomting Chöje Miphampa, the incarnate lama who requested the teachings presented in this book. A great master of the Drukpa Kagyü lineage.[EMP] [RY]

Mipham Rinpoche (1846-1912) A student of Jamgön Kongtrül, Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Paltrul Rinpoche. Blessed by Manjushri, he became one of the greatest scholars of his time. His collected works fill more than 30 volumes. His chief disciple was Shechen Gyaltsab Pema Namgyal. Mipham was a close student of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and regarded as a direct emanation of Manjushri. [RY]

Mipham Rinpoche (mi pham rin po che). Great Nyingma master and writer of the last century. [RY]

Mipham Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Mipham Rinpoche; [LWx] [RY]

miraculous power of mastery over wind and mind [LW1] [RY]

Miraculous powers (rdzu 'phrul). [RY]

Mirror of Magical Display (sgyu 'phrul me long) [LW1] [RY]

Mirror of Magical Display; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Mirror of Mindfulness by Tsele Natsok Rangdröl, Shambhala Publications, Boston. [ZL] [RY]

Mirror-like wisdom (me long lta bu'i ye shes). One of the five wisdoms. The transmutation of anger. [RY]

Misdeeds (sdig pa), mi dge ba'i las). This word refers chiefly to the ten unvirtuous actions. [RY]

misdeeds (sdig pa). See also karma; sub-aspects of [LW1] [RY]

misdeeds [LW1] [RY]

misdeeds; sub-aspects of [LWx] [RY]

mistaken cognition ('khrul pa'i sems); as synonym for the all-ground [LW1] [RY]

mistaken dependent phenomena ('khrul pa'i gzhan dbang) [LW1] [RY]

Mitra Yogin; (mi tra dzo gi). A siddha from India who received teachings from Chenrezig who appeared to him. The transmission of his "Six Vajra Yogas" is still alive and can be found in Volume 16 (Ma) of the gdams ngag mdzod of Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul blo gros mtha' yas, 1813-1899). [MR]

Mitradzoki. [RY]

Miyowa. [RY]

Mleccha (kla klo). Barbarian, one ignorant of Sanskrit. [RY]

Momentary defilement (glo bur gyi dri ma). The obscurations that are not intrinsic to the buddha nature, like clouds are not inherent in the sky. [RY]

Mon (mon) Name for lands to the south and southwest of Tibet. [Rain of Wisdom]

Mön [LW1] [RY]

Monastic study center. [RY]

Mön-gong Cave (mon gong brag phug). [ZL] [RY]

Monkey Meditator (sprel sgom) [LW1] [RY]

Monkey Meditator (sprel sgom) [LWx] [RY]

Monkey meditator (sprel sgom), [RY]

Monkey-faced Chieftain of Shang (zhang blon sprel zha can). [ZL] [RY]

Mönkha (mon kha). [ZL] [RY]

Monkha Senge Dzong (mon kha seng ge rdzong). a cave situated to the east of Bumthang in Bhutan which was used by Padmasambhava and later by Yeshe Tsogyal as a sacred place for sadhana. [RY]

Month of miracles. The first month of the lunar year, the first two weeks of which is said to be the time that the Buddha manifested miracles at Shravasti to overcome the challenges of non-Buddhist teachers. [Peter Roberts]

Möntha Dragtha Tramo (mon mtha' brag mtha' khra mo). [ZL] [RY]

Moon with a garland of stars (zla ba skar phreng). The first of 'four aspects of approach and accomplishment.' [RY]

Moons of Speech. Syn. buddha [LW1] [RY]

Moons of Speech; alias buddha [LWx] [RY]

Moral discipline {tshul khrims}. One of the six transcending perfections. [RY]

Morality (shila, tshul khrims). The second Perfections. [RY]

Most of the money circulating in Tibet in the second half of the eighteenth century was Nepalese silver coins. Although some were made of pure silver and some of 50 per cent alloy, they all circulated in Tibet at the same value (see Rhodes 1980). In 1768-69, Prithvi Narayan Shah, chief of Gorkha (a principality thirty miles west of Kathmandu) overthrew the Newari rulers in Kathmandu Valley and conquered most of the other areas of what is now Nepal. He then demonetized the debased coins, which became valued at half of those made of fine silver. This devaluation was not accepted by Tibetans, to whom it would have caused great losses. Trouble broke out in 1786, just after the regent-king of Tibet, Tsemön Ling Ngawang Tsultrim, had been invited to China. In 1788, the Gorkhali army invaded Tibet. In 1789 a treaty was signed in favor of the Gorkhalis, who withdrew their troops. Returning from China, the Tsemön Ling regent scolded his ministers for their feebleness in dealing with the Gorkhalis, but he died in 1791. In one incident, Tibetan negotiators who had come to Nyanang were killed, or taken prisoner by the Gorkhalis in a trap set on the occasion of a religious festival, during which Gorkhali soldiers had disguised themselves as merchants and coolies. In 1791, a strong Gorkhali army of eighteen thousand men again invaded Tibet as far as Tashi Lhunpo. The Tibetan army counterattacked and pushed the Gorkhali forces back to Nyanang. At that point, thirteen thousand Manchu troops arrived in Tibet and joined the ten thousand Tibetans soldiers. Together they drove the Gorkhalis back to within twenty miles of Kahtmandu. In 1792, a treaty was signed between Nepal, Tibet, and China. In Lhasa, the populace began to protest against the presence of the Chinese army, which, they said, had entered Tibet unasked for, and had caused more harm to the Tibetans than the Gorkhalis themselves. Following this, the two Ambans were removed for misconduct and returned to China. The new Ambans sent to Lhasa retained a little power for some time, but this power vanished soon after the death of Emperor Qianlong in 1796. After a period of intrigue, one of the Ambans was returned to China in chains and the other one exiled to Chinese Turkestan. A few more Ambans were sent to Lhasa. The last one was expelled in 1912, under the thirteenth Dalai Lama. After this, the Chinese lost their influence in Tibet until the 1950 invasion (See Shakabpa, 1976 and 1984). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Most Secret and Unsurpassable Dagger (phur pa yang gsang bla med): rediscovered by Chögyal Ratna Lingpa (chos rgyal ratna gling pa, 1403-78). Ratna Lingpa is said to be the only Tertön who always met with perfectly auspicious circumstances (rten 'brel) and could thus find the complete set of termas that were prophecied to him. On the life-story of this master and the account of his revelations, see Collected Rediscovered Teachings of Ratna gLing-pa, vols. 1 and 2, as well as NS, pp. 793-95. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Most Secret Vajra Tantra (rdo rje rab tu gsang ba'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Most Supreme (che mchog). Chemchok Heruka. Usually identical with Nectar Quality, the chief heruka of the ratna family. Sometimes, in the case of Assemblage of Sugatas, the Most Supreme is the heruka who embodies all the buddha families. [ZL] [RY]

Most Supreme Display Root Tantra (che mchog rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga; focused on Nectar Quality. [ZL] [RY]

Mother Deities (ma mo). See mamo. [ZL] [RY]

Mother Deities Assemblage Tantra (ma mo 'dus pa'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. Found in Vol. A of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Mother Deities Display Root Tantra (ma mo rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. [ZL] [RY]

Mother luminosity (ma'i 'od gsal). The ground luminosity of the natural state inherent as the enlightened essence of all sentient beings. [RY]

Mother of Knowledge by Namkhai Nyingpo, translated by Tarthang Tulku, Dharma Publishing, Berkeley. [ZL] [RY]

Mother Scripture (Prajnaparamita) (yum) [LW1] [RY]

Mother Scripture (Prajnaparamita); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Mother Tantra (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which place emphasis on completion stage or prajna. Sometimes equivalent of Anu Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Mother Tantra (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which place emphasis on completion stage. [RY]

MOTHER TANTRA (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which places emphasis on completion stage or prajna. Sometimes equivalent to Anu Yoga. [AL] [RY]

Mother tantra (ma rgyud). Tantras of the Anuttara yoga class are divided into Father tantras such as the Guhyasamaja, which emphasize the Method side, the practice of the Illusory Body; and Mother tantra such as the Samvara and hevajra, which emphasize more the Wisdom side, the indivisibility of Bliss and Emptiness. [RY]

Mother Tantra (ma rgyud); as Anu Yoga [LW1] [RY]

Mother Tantra [LWx] [RY]

Mother Tantra Anu Yoga (ma rgyud a nu yo ga) [LWx] [RY]

Mount Hepori (has po ri). See Hepori. [ZL] [RY]

Mount Kailash 1. Usually accessed via Purang (Taklakot). On the circumambulation path of the mountain itself there used to be four monastery, Gyangtra to the south, Nyenri to the west (*), Dri ra Phuk to the norht and Zutrul Phuk to the south. All four were practically destroyed during the Chinese invasion but are now under restoration (exept for Nyenri). The starting point for the circumambulation is Darchen, a sheep-trading center and the main village in the area. After a few hours westward one reaches Tarpoche a grassy valley filled with prayer flags where Buddhist festival used to be held. One hour north of Tarpoche are the ruins of Nyenri Monastery and Langchen Phuk a cave blessed by Guru Padmasambhava. At Chugu there are a lot of mani stones and Pema Phuk a cave blessed by Buddha Shakyamuni. Then come accross a large rock known as Guru Padmasambhava' torma. Then one passes three peaks associated with the three deities of longevity (Amitayus, White Tara, and Vijaya). [RY]

Mount Kailash 2. The one reaches Dira Phuk from where one can see the northern face of Mt Kailash and the mountains of the Protectors of the Three Kinds of Beings (Mnajushri to the west, and Avalokiteshvara and Vajrapani to the east). Then cross the Drolma La (5670 m). On the way up to the pass is Vajrayogini Cemetery, still used to deposit the bodies of those who die while on pilgrimage. After the pass one sees the Tukje Chenpo Lake (Gori Kund). From the bottom of the slopes one takes the eastern valley for five hours to Zutrul Phuk. The monastery has been recently rebuild around the cave itself. From there in 5-6 hrs one reaches back to Darchen. North from Darchen on can go to Gyangtra, now rebuilt by Drigung monks, and then to the ruins of Sera Lung Monastery. From there to go closer to the mountain itself one needs to have completed 13 circumambulations of the moutain. One then reaches the moraines of the south face of Kailash. There used to be there 13 stupas with relics of Patriarchs of the Drigung lineage. Slightly off this route are the two small lakes of Tso Kapala. [MR]

Mount Malaya (ri bo ma la ya). [ZL] [RY]

Mount Meru - world axis; the mountain at the center of a world system, ringed by chains of lesser mountains lakes, continents, and oceans. [RY]

Mount Meru (ri rab). Same as 'Mt. Sumeru.' [RY]

Mount Meru {ri rab}. The axis of the universe according to traditional Hindu-Buddhist cosmology. [RY]

Mount Potala (ri bo gru 'dzin). [RY]

Mount Potala. See Potala [LW1] [RY]

Mount Sumeru (ri rab lhun po). The mythological giant mountain at the center of our world-system surrounded by the four continents, where the two lowest classes of gods of the Desire Realm live. It is encircled by chains of lesser mountains, lakes, continents, and oceans and is said to rise 84000 leagues above sea-level. [ZL] [RY]

Mount Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the world surrounded by the four continents. [RY]

Mount Sumeru [LW1] [RY]

MOUNT SUMERU AND THE FOUR CONTINENTS MOUNT SUMERU (ri rab lhun po gling bzhi dang bcas pa). The mythological giant mountain at the center of our world-system surrounded by the four continents, where the two lowest classes of gods of the Desire Realm live. It is encircled by chains of lesser mountains, lakes, continents, and oceans and is said to rise 84,000 leagues above sea-level. Our present world is situated on the southern continent called Jambudvipa.[AL] [RY]

Mount Tisey [LW1] [RY]

Mountain Dharma (ri chos), intended for those living simple lives meditating in the mountains, where they would not be able to perform elaborate rituals. [Peter Roberts]

Mountain Pile (ri bo brtsegs pa). See Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Mrdanga (rdza rnga). A kind of large drum. [RY]

Mt. Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the world surrounded by the four continents. [RY]

Mudra (phyag rgya) gestures symbolizing particular spiritual attributes or steps toward perfection. There are technically four types of mudra: the symbolic seal (Skt. Upayamudra, Dam tshig phyag rgya); the female partner in tantric practices or the visualized partner who represents Pristine Awareness (Skt. Karmamudra or Jnanamudra, Las kyi phyag rgya or Ye shes kyi phyag rgya); the seal of the Absolute (Skt. Dharmamudra, Chos kyi phyag rgya); and the Great Seal (Skt. Mahamudra, Phyag rgya chen po). [RY]

Mudra (phyag rgya). Can mean either 'hand gesture,' spiritual consort, or the 'bodily form' of a deity. [ZL] [RY]

Mudra (phyag rgya). Lit. 'seal, token.' 1. A symbolic hand gesture, endowed with power not unlike a mantra. 2. A tantric consort. [RY]

Mudra of equanimity (mnyam bzhag gi phyag rgya). The hands placed in the gesture of meditation just as Buddha Amitabha. [RY]

Mudra of expounding the Dharma (chos 'chad pa'i phyag rgya) [RY]

mudra yoga. The mudra or "seal" yoga, means the visualisation of the deity's body. [Peter Roberts]

Mukhale [LW1] [RY]

Mulasarvastivadin - One of the eighteen schools, preserved as a Vinaya lineage of Tibet [RY]

Mundane beings are the six classes of sentient beings. [RY]

Mundane dakinis. [Daki] [RY]

Mundane dhyana ('jig rten pa'i bsam gtan). A meditation state characterized by attachment, especially to bliss, clarity and nonthought, and lacking insight into the emptiness of a self-entity. [RY]

mundane dhyanas ('jig rten pa'i bsam gtan) [LW1] [RY]

mundane dhyanas [LWx] [RY]

Mundane Mother Deities' ('jig rten ma mo). [RY]

Mundane Mother Deities ('jig rten ma mo). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Female divinities manifested out of dharmadhatu but appearing in ways that correspond to mundane appearances through the interrelationship between the mundane world and the channels, winds, and essences within our body. They have both an ultimate and relative aspect. The chief figure in this mandala is Chemchok Heruka, the wrathful form of Buddha Samantabhadra in the form known as Ngöndzok Gyalpo, the King of True Perfection. [ZL] [RY]

Mundane samadhis ('jig rten pa'i ting nge 'dzin). Similar to 'mundane dhyana.' [RY]

mundane wisdom resulting from meditation (sgom byung 'jig rten pa'i ye shes) [LWx] [RY]

Mundane Worship ('jig rten mchod bstod). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. [ZL] [RY]

Mundane Worship (mchod bstod) [LWx] [RY]

Mune Tsenpo: 774- [MR]

Muney Tsenpo (mu ne btsan po). [ZL] [RY]

Muney Tsenpo, son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]

Muni (thub pa). The six munis are the six emanations of Samantabhadra which tame the beings of the six realms. [RY]

Murderous Yakshas (srog gcod gnod sbyin). [ZL] [RY]

Muri Tsenpo (mu ri btsan po) [ZL] [RY]

Murub Tsenpo Son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]

Murub Tsenpo. [RY]

Murub Tseypo (mu rub btsad po). The youngest son of Trisong Deutsen also known as Prince Virtuous Protector. [ZL] [RY]

Murub Tseypo. Also incarnated as Do Drubchen. [RY]

Murub Tseypo; [LWx] [RY]

Murub Tseypo; background information on the past life of Chokgyur Lingpa by H.H. Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche; Prince Damdzin; Prince Translator [LW1] [RY]

Mustang - The ancient Tibetan kingdom of Lo Mantang or Mustang, incorporated into Nepal in the late eighteenth century, following the Gurkha war. Ngari Panchen Pema Wangyal (mnga' ris pan chen padma dbang rgyal, 1487-1542), as well as many learned Sakya teachers, originated from Mustang. See D.P. Jackson, The Mollas of Mustang, LTWA, 1984. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mutig Tseypo (mu tig btsad po). The second son of Trisong Deutsen also known as Seyna-lek Jing-yön. [ZL] [RY]

Mutri Tsenpo, son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]

Mutri Tseypo. See Murub Tseypo [LW1] [RY]

Mutri Tseypo; [LWx] [RY]

Mutsamey (mu tsa me). [ZL] [RY]

mutually co-operating cause (lhan cig byed pa'i rgyu); in terms of ignorance [LWx] [RY]

mutually cooperating cause (lhan cig byed pa'i rgyu); in terms of ignorance [LW1] [RY]

myrobalan - all-victorious myrobalan (rnam rgyal a ru ra, Lat. Terminalia chebula), renowned as the panacea, is a dry fruit used in the preparation of many herbal and sacramental medicines. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mysteries of body, speech and mind (sku gsung thugs kyi gsang ba). The vajra body, speech and mind. [RY]


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 12:53, 12 August 2008 (EDT)