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Passing obscuration ('pho sgrib) refers to the obscuration of the passing of the white and red elements. [RY]

Passing stains (glo bur gyi dri ma). The obscurations that are not intrinsic to the sugatagarbha, like clouds are not inherent in the sky. [RY]

Passionate, (chags), means semi-wrathful just like a deity for the increasing or magnetizing activities. [RY]

Pataliputra - City in Magadha; capital of Ashoka's empire [RY]

path (lam). See also five paths; detailed; five aspects of the path in Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo; of accumulation; summary of [LW1] [RY]

Path and Fruition (lam 'bras). See Lamdrey. [RY]

Path and Result (lam 'bras). See Lamdrey. [RY]

path beyond training [LWx] [RY]

Path Mahamudra (lam phyag rgya chen po). The stages of approaching the recognition of the sugatagarbha and of applying that recognition in one's practice. [RY]

Path of Accumulation - see Five Paths. [RY]

Path of accumulation (tshogs lam). The first of the five paths which emphasize the accumulation of merit, faith and mindfulness. [RY]

Path of accumulation (tshogs lam). The first of the five paths which forms the foundation for the journey towards liberation and involves gathering a vast accumulation of merit dedicated towards this attainment. On this path one gains and intellectual and conceptual understanding of egolessness through learning and reflection. By means of cultivating the four applications of mindfulness, the four right endeavors, and the four legs of miraculous action, one succedes in eliminating the gross defilements that cause samsaric suffering and in attaining the virtuous qualities of the superknowledges and the 'samadhi of the stream of Dharma' leading to the path of accumulation. [RY]

Path of Accumulation (tshogs lam). The first of the five paths which forms the foundation for the journey towards liberation and involves gathering a vast accumulation of merit dedicated towards this attainment. On this path one gains an intellectual and conceptual understanding of egolessness through learning and reflection. By means of cultivating the four applications of mindfulness, the four right endeavors, and the four legs of miraculous action, one succeeds in eliminating the gross defilements that cause samsaric suffering and in attaining the virtuous qualities of the superknowledges and the 'samadhi of the stream of Dharma' leading to the path of joining.[AL] [RY]

path of accumulation; expl. identity and its three levels [LWx] [RY]

Path of Application - see Five Paths. [RY]

path of consummation (mthar phyin pa'i lam); in relation to the four vidyadhara levels [LWx] [RY]

Path of consummation (thar phyin pa'i lam). The fifth of the five path and the state of complete and perfect enlightenment. [RY]

path of cultivation (sgom lam) [LW1] [RY]

Path of cultivation (sgom lam). The fourth of the five paths on which one cultivates and trains in the higher practices of a bodhisattva, especially the eight aspects of the path of noble beings. [RY]

path of cultivation (sgom lam); expl.; in relation to the four vidyadhara levels [LWx] [RY]

Path of fulfillment (mthar phyin pa'i lam). Same as the 'path of no-learning.' [RY]

Path of joining (sbyor lam). The second of the five paths on which one grows closer to and joins with the realization of the truth of reality. [RY]

path of joining (sbyor lam); in regard to the dhyanas [LW1] [RY]

path of joining; expl.; in regard to the dhyanas [LWx] [RY]

Path of learning (slob pa'i lam). The first four of the five paths on which there is still the concepts of progress, training and learning. [RY]

Path of liberation (grol lam). 1) When related to the 'path of ripening' it refers to the practice of the oral instructions of one's personal vajra master. 2) When related to the 'path of means' it refers to the practice of sustaining the natural state of mind; Mahamudra or Dzogchen. [ZL] [RY]

Path of Liberation (grol lam). The path of Mahamudra practice. [RY]

path of liberation; in regard to the dhyanas [LW1] [RY]

Path of Means (thabs lam). Here, it refers to the practices of the Six Doctrines. [RY]

Path of means (thabs lam). Refers to the Six Doctrines of Naropa as well as to the stages of development and completion with attributes. [RY]

Path of means (thabs lam). Refers to the stages of development and completion with attributes. [ZL] [RY]

Path of means. explained by Mipham Rinpoche in dngos grub snying po pgs. 21A and onwards; explains also Vajrayana, Secret Mantra vehicle, vehicle of fruition, etc., in detail. [RY]

Path of no-learning (mi slob pa'i lam). The fifth of the five path and the state of complete and perfect enlightenment. [RY]

Path of ripening (smin lam). The process of receiving the four empowerments. [ZL] [RY]

Path of Seeing (mthong lam). The third of the five paths which is the attainment of the first bhumi, liberation from samsara and realization of the truth of reality. [RY]

path of seeing (mthong lam); expl.; in relation to the four vidyadhara levels [LWx] [RY]

Path of the two stages (rim gnyis kyi lam). The two stages of development and completion which are the means and knowledge (prajna and upaya) of Vajrayana practice. [RY]

path of training (slob lam) [LW1] [RY]

Path of training (slob pa'i lam). The first four of the five paths. The fifth is also called the 'path beyond training' and corresponds to perfect buddhahood. [ZL] [RY]

Path wisdom (lam gyi ye shes). The experience of innate wakefulness pointed out by one's master in which full stability has not been reached. Compare with fruition wisdom. [RY]

path; detailed expl.; five aspects of; summary of [LWx] [RY]

PATHS (lam). See under 'five paths.'[AL] [RY]

Paths (lam). The five paths or stages on the way to enlightenment: the path of accumulation, joining, seeing, cultivation, and no more learning. They can be explained differently according to each of the three vehicles. [RY]

Paths and bhumis (sa lam). The five paths and the ten bodhisattva levels. [RY]

Paths and levels (sa lam). See paths and bhumis. [RY]

Paths of learning (slob pa'i lam). The first four of the five paths on which concepts of progress, training and learning still remain. [RY]

paths of training [LWx] [RY]

patience (bzod pa); expl. three types [LW1] [RY]

Patience (ksanti, titiksa; bzod pa). The third Perfection. [RY]

patience; expl. three types; five notions ('du shes lnga); five notions ('du shes lnga), expl.; nine considerations; nine considerations (brtags pa dgu), expl. [LWx] [RY]

Patra (pa tra). A brick ornamented with flourishes. A gold patra possibly weighs several kilos. [ZL] [RY]

Patrul Rinpoche, (see also Paltrul Rinpoche) Orgyen Jigme Chökyi Wangpo (dpal sprul o rgyan 'jigs med chos kyi dbang po), also known as Dzogchen Palge Tulku :1808-87 [MR]

Pawo I, Chöwang Lhündrub: 1440-1503 [MR]

Pawo Rinpoche, The eighth Tsuklak Chökyi Gyatso (gtsug lag chos kyi rgya mtsho, 1785-1840). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pawo Rinpoche. [RY]

Pawo Tsukla Trengwa 2nd (gtsug lag 'phreng ba): 1504 /1454-1566 [MR]

Pawo Wangchen Drak. [RY]

Pawo X, Tsuglag Nangwa Wangchuk: 1912- [MR]

payment (brngan) [RY]

Peace, shanti, (zhi ba). Nirvana. [RY]

Peaceful and wrathful buddhas (zhi khro). The 42 peaceful buddhas: Samantabhadra and Samantabhadri, the 5 male and female buddhas, the 8 male and female bodhisattvas, the 6 munis, and the 4 male and female gatekeepers. The 58 wrathful buddhas: the 5 male and female herukas, the 8 yoginis, the 8 tramen goddesses, the 4 female gatekeepers, and the 28 shvaris. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Peaceful and wrathful buddhas. The forty-two peaceful buddhas: Samantabhadra and Samantabhadri, the five male and female buddhas, the eight male and female bodhisattvas, the six munis, and the four male and female gate-keepers. The fifty-eight wrathful buddhas: the five male and female herukas, the eight yoginis, the eight tramen goddesses, the four female gatekeepers, the twenty-eight shvaris. [RY]

Peaceful and wrathful ones (zhi khro). The 42 peaceful and 58 wrathful divinities. [RY]

peaceful and wrathful yidams [LW1] [RY]

Peaceful deities of vajradhatu (zhi ba rdo rje dbyings kyi lha tshogs). The forty-two peaceful deities: Samantabhadra and Samantabhadri, the five male and female buddhas, the eight male and female bodhisattvas, the six munis, and the four male and female gate-keepers. [RY]

Peaceful Vajradhatu Tantra (zhi ba rdo rje dbyings kyi rgyud). [RY]

peaceful-activity commencing at dawn. Dawn not being of course such a variable in Tibet as in northern countries, but should here be taken as meaning very early in the morning, for example, five a.m. [Peter Roberts]

peacocks dance - According to popular belief, there are no male peacocks, and the thunder-dragon is the peacock's husband. This is the reason peacocks dance when there is thunder: they are happily welcoming their husbands. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Peak of Malaya [LW1] [RY]

Peak of Meteoric Iron [LW1] [RY]

Peak of Meteoric Iron; [LWx] [RY]

Peak Scripture (rtse mo); details of [LW1] [RY]

Peak Scripture (rtse mo); details of; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Peak Scripture, (rtse mo), is one of the three Yoga tantras known as dpal rtse dbyings gsum. [RY]

Pearl Crystal Cave of Pama Ridge (mu tig shel gyi spa ma gangs). This is the practice cave of Guru Rinpoche where he gave many of the Instructions found in Dakini Teachings. [ZL] [RY]

Pearl Garland Tantra (mu tig phreng ba'i rgyud). One of the Dzogchen tantras. [RY]

Pearl Garland Tantra (mu tig phreng ba'i rgyud). This tantra is taught for the sake of preventing awareness from straying back by means of bringing it to maturation. It teaches how to practice, reach familiarity and liberation. [RY]

Pecha (dpe cha). A Tibetan-style book, made of long strips of paper, unbound, in imitation of the Indian palm-leaf manuscripts. [RY]

Pehar - The Protector (chos skyong) and the Dharma Lord (chos rje) of Samye. At Samye, Guru Padmasambhava subdued all the king-spirits (rgyal po) and put them under the power of King Pehar (pe har). He did the same with all the Tsens (btsan), whom he put under the power of Tsimara (tsi ma ra). The Protector of Samye, Gyalpo Pehar, sometimes descends into, or inhabits, a predestined person called the Dharma Lord of Samye. When present in the Dharma Lord, Pehar gives prophecies for the sake of Tibet and the Dharma. When Pehar took the oath not to harm any beings and to guard them and Guru Rinpoche's teachings, he offered his heart to Guru Rinpoche as a symbol of his pledge. Until recently this "heart" was kept in a precious box that only the Oracle was allowed to open. He would do so once a year. When Kyabje Dudjom Rinpoche (1903-87) gave the empowerment of the Rinchen Terdzö (rin chen gter mdzod) at Samye, at one point the Oracle went into a trance and showed him this heart, which looked like a fresh heart. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pekar (pe kar). The particular protector of Samye appointed and bound under oath by Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]

Pekar Temple (pe kar gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Pelek Gonpa (spe legs dgon pa), the "Exemplary Monastery," so called after the remarkable stone house built there by Sangye Lama (gter ston sangs rgyas bla ma), the first of all tertöns. The monastery is built on the large cave of bde chen skyid phug, where Ra Lotsawa stayed, and is situated west of Sakya. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pelgyeling ('phel rgyas gling), the "Place of Increase and Expansion," was named by Milarepa. After Milarepa's death, a monastery was built upon the Garuda Cave, Namkha Ding Phug (nam mkha' lding phug), a cave where Milarepa meditated for several years, in the "Nyelam," or more correctly Nyanang (gnya' nang) Valley. At the nearby Belly Cave (grod pa phug, see PP, NLY, and MI), one can still see the hand and footprint that Milarepa left miraculously on the rock. Rechungpa's cave lies slightly above Milarepa's cave. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pema Chögyal of Me-nyag [LW1] [RY]

Pema Chögyal of Me-nyag [LWx] [RY]

Pema Dechen Lingpa. (bde chen gling pa) Rongtön Pema Dechen Lingpa (17th century) [Peter Roberts]

Pema Gargyi Wangchuk Tsal. (pad ma gar gyi dbang phyug rtsal). This is Jamgön Kongtrül's "secret" or Tantric name, which he received during a rtsa gsum dril sgrub "Practice of the Three Roots in Unison" empowerment in 1836, when he was twenty-three years old. [Peter Roberts]

Pema Garwang Tsal. Jamgön Kongtrül (1813-1899) [Peter Roberts]

Pema Gungtsen of Gö ('gos pad ma gung btsan) [LW1] [RY]

Pema Gyurme. [RY]

Pema Gyurmey Tekchog Tenphel [LW1] [RY]

Pema Jungney (pad ma 'byung gnas). One of the 12 manifestations. [RY]

Pema Karpo,the second King of Shambhala; Pundarika [LW1] [RY]

Pema Karpo; the second King of Shambhala [LWx] [RY]

Pema Künkyab Yeshe Dorje Nyingpo. See Könchok Gyurmey Tenpey Gyaltsen [LW1] [RY]

Pema Ledrel Tsal (padma las 'brel rtsal) (1291-1315). The reincarnation of Pema Sal, the daughter of King Trisong Deutsen. The revealer of the Dzogchen teachings of Guru Rinpoche renowned as Khandro Nyingtig. His immediate rebirth was as Longchenpa. Pema Ledrel Tsal means 'Lotus Power of Karmic Link.'[AL] [RY]

Pema Ledrel Tsal, 1291-1315? (Pad ma las 'brel rtsal). The incarnation of the daughter of King Trisong Deutsen and the revealer of the Dzogchen teachings of Guru Rinpoche renowned as Khandro Nyingthig. His immediate rebirth was Longchenpa. [RY]

Pema Ledreltsel (padma las 'brel rtsal), see NS note 614 and BM, p. 152. For Tulku Lekden, see BM, p.153, TN p.520-22, and other references summarized in Ehrhard (1990), 109 n.94. Regarding the other masters of this lineage, the sources are GT, Vol.2, pp. 27-62 and pp. 79-109; the zhus lan bdud rtsi gser phreng and the lo rgyus rin po che'i phreng ba from the mkha' 'gro snying thig, part I, vol. 7 of Longchenpa's Nyingthig Yazhi (snying thig ya bzhi); BM, pp. 152-61, and NS p. 595. Other ramifications of the Khandro Nyingthig lineage are described in GT, vol.2, pp. 110-14 and in Thondup 1984, 34-35. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pema Lingpa [LW1] [RY]

Pema Lingpa: 1445-1521 (pad ma gling pa). Padma Dechen Lingpa was a mind emanation of the great translator Vairachana. [RY]

Pema Lingpa: 1445-1521. [RY]

Pema Ninjay Wangpo (pad ma nyin byed dbang po) "Lotus Daylight-Bringer Power"The name of the ninth Tai Situpa, Pema Ninjay Wangpo, who was the root-teacher of Jamgön Kongtrül. [Peter Roberts]

Pema Nyinche Wangpo. The ninth Tai Situpa () (1774-1853) A holder of the Karma-Kagyu lineage. (padma nyin byed dbang po) [Peter Roberts]

Pema Sal, Princess (lha lcam padma sal). The daughter of King Trisong Deutsen, to whom Padmasambhava entrusted his own lineage of the Great Perfection known as Khandro Nyingtig. She died at an early age, after which Padmasambhava miraculously called her back to life. When her father asked why someone with the great merit to be both a princess and a disciple of the Lotus-Born master had to die while still a child, Padmasambhava told the story of how she had been a bee who stung one of the four brothers during the completion of the Great Stupa of Boudhanath. Pema Sal means 'Radiant Lotus.'[AL] [RY]

Pema Sangnak Tendzin Chögyal (padma gsang sngags bstan 'dzin chos rgyal, 1760-1817), see SG. Dechen Gyalpo recognized Tendzin Chögyal to be an incarnation of the famous siddha of Vajra Kilaya, Langlap Changchup Dorje (langs lab byang chub rdo rje), see NG folio 6a. The list of teachings received by Tendzin Chögyal from Dechen Gyalpo has much in common with the transmissions that Shabkar himself received from Chögyal Ngakyi Wangpo and other teachers of the same lineage. These teachings included the new termas of Dechen Gyalpo , and those of Thekchog Dorje, Ratön Tertön, Namchak Tsasum Lingpa, and Dungtso Repa. See NG, 52/b to 53/a. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Pema Siddhi: 1888 [MR]

Pema Trinley Nyingpo. See Jokyab Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Pema Trinley Nyingpo; alias Jokyab Rinpoche [LWx] [RY]

Pema Wangchuk. [RY]

Pemakö (padma bkod), one of the main sacred "hidden lands" (sbas yul) connected with Vajrasattva and Guru Padmasambhava. It is located in southeast Tibet, north of the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Penor Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

perceiver and perceived (gzung 'dzin) [LW1] [RY]

Perceiver and perceived" (gzung 'dzin). [RY]

perceiver and the perceived [LWx] [RY]

perceptions of the six senses (tshogs drug gi snang ba) are the experiences of sights, sounds, smells, tastes, textures, and mental events. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Perception Sphere (skye mched). A state of meditative absorption, possibly lasting many aeons. See under 'Formless Realms.'[AL] [RY]

Perception-spheres (skye mched). Refer here to the states of mind of the four formless realms. See also 'fourfold spheres of perception.' [RY]

perfect (phun sum tshogs pa) [LW1] [RY]

Perfect Buddha samyak-sambuddha, (yang dag rdzogs sangs rgyas). [RY]

Perfect buddhahood (rdzogs pa'i sangs rgyas). The extinction of all faults and obscurations and the perfection of all enlightened qualities. [RY]

perfect place perfect; expl. the realms of the three kayas [LW1] [RY]

perfect place; expl. the realms of the three kayas; [LWx] [RY]

Perfect recall (mi brjed pa'i gzungs). A perfect memory the essence of which is non-distraction. [RY]

perfect retinue; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

perfect teacher; expl. [LW1] [RY]

perfect teaching; explanation of the teaching systems of the three kayas [LW1] [RY]

perfect time; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

Perfected in Body (sku la rdzogs); charnel ground [LW1] [RY]

Perfecting Stage (Skt. Sampannakrama, rDzogs rim) a non-conceptual stage in tantric practice; in the Perfecting Stage, the visualizations of the Development Stage dissolve into an experience of openness. [RY]

Perfection (paramita; pha rol (tu) phyin pa, phar phyin). For most purposes, there are six P. a Bodhisattva must practice - Giving, Morality, patience, Joyous Energy, Meditative absorption (dhyana) and wisdom. In the scheme of the Dasha-bhumika sutra, the list is extended to ten by the addition of Skill in Means, Vow, Power and Wisdom-knowledge, but very little is taught of these extra four. Overwhelmingly the most important is the P. of Wisdom (prajna paramita), to which a major branch of the sutra and commentarial literature has been devoted. (see The Perfection of Wisdom in 8,000 Lines (RiBa) [RY]

perfection (rnam byang) [LW1] [RY]

Perfection (rnam byang). Same as nirvana or enlightenment. [RY]

Permanent or annihilated (rtag chad). Lasting forever as in an eternalistic point of view or ceasing to exist as in a nihilistic view. [RY]

Pernakchen (ber nag can), the central mahakala of the Karma Kagyu. [RY]

perpetuating aggregates (nye bar len pa'i phung po). See five aggregates [LW1] [RY]

perpetuating cause (nyer len gyi rgyu); in terms of ignorance [LWx] [RY]

perpetuating consciousness (len pa'i rnam shes); as synonym for the all-ground [LWx] [RY]

P continued - P1


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

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--Richard 12:59, 12 August 2008 (EDT)