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S continued - S continued - S1 - S continued - S2 - S continued - S3 - S continued - S4 - S continued - S5 - S continued - S6


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Seven aspects of union (kha sbyor yan lag bdun). The seven qualities of a sambhogakaya buddha: complete enjoyment, union, great bliss, absence of a self-nature, presence of compassion, being uninterrupted, and being unceasing. [ZL] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun) [LWx] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun). Samadhi, full discernment of phenomena, mindfulness, diligence, rejoicing/joy, pliancy, and impartiality. [E] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven branch prayer a number of times. The seven branch prayer, is a prayer of homage, offering, confession, rejoicing in the good actions of others, requesting the Dharma-wheel to be turned, a supplication to not pass away into the parinirvana, and a dedication of one's good karma. [Peter Roberts]

seven branch prayer. The original terma text: Rigdzin Jatson Nyingpo's terma are in six volumes, the Köncho Chidu, or Ratnasamanyasamgha texts form the first volume. The various practices are in the form of short texts, that have to be combined in one's practice. Jamgön Kongtrül is here describing a practice being done in relation to these texts. Later, he compiled a sadhana and a preliminary text from this, which is what is now generally used. In his version of the sadhana, the seven-line prayer does not, as in the original text, follow the refuge and bodhicitta verse, instead Vajrasattva does. and the seven-line prayer is inserted into the mandala-offering section. In the detailed preliminary text, the line of refuge is contained within a specially written section, as are the three lines of the bodhicitta. A Vajrasattva practice then follows, and this seven-branch prayer opens the mandala-section. [Peter Roberts]

seven branches (yan lag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]

Seven branches (yan lag bdun pa). The seven branch practice of prostrating to the Three Jewels, confessing negative actions, making offering, rejoicing in the virtue of others, requesting to turn the wheel of Dharma, beseeching to not pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit to the enlightenment of all sentient beings. [RY]

seven branches (yan lag bdun pa); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Seven Chapters {le'u bdun ma}. A famous supplication to Padmasambhava in seven songs revealed by terton Zangpo Tragpa, 14th century. [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun) [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven collections [LWx] [RY]

seven collections of consciousness (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [RY]

seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LWx] [RY]

Seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [RY]

seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]

seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LWx] [RY]

Seven golden mountains (gser ri bdun). According to the cosmology of the Abhidharma, seven circles of mountains surrounding Mount Sumeru in the center of our universe. [ZL] [RY]

Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LWx] [RY]

Seven kinds of vows of the pratimoksha (so so thar pa'i ris bdun). Seven sets of vows for ordained monks and nuns, novices and lay people. See 'Individual Liberation.' [RY]

Seven Line Prayer. [RY]

Seven Line Supplication (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). [ZL] [RY]

SEVEN LINE SUPPLICATION (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). The famous supplication to Padmasambhava beginning with "On the northwest border of the country of Uddiyana, …"[AL] [RY]

Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun), [RY]

Seven noble riches ('phags pa'i nor bdun) The richness of faith, discipline, diligence, modesty, learning, generosity and intelligence. [RY]

seven noble riches or qualities ('phags pa'i nor bdun). Faith, discipline, generosity, learning, a sense of moral shame in front of others, a sense of ethical conscience in regard to oneself, and intelligence. One also speaks of faith, which is like a river; discipline, which is like a flower; generosity, which is like a jewel; learning, which is like an ocean; samaya, which is like a crystal; a sense of moral shame, which is undeceiving like one's own parents; and wisdom, which is like the sun. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Patriarchs - Early leader of the Sangha in the time after the Buddha. Some traditions recognize eight or more patriarchs. [RY]

Seven points of meditation posture (rnam snang chos bdun). The legs in crosslegged position, the spine straight, the shoulders extended, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose. [RY]

Seven points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma) written by Geshe Chen-ngawa (spyan snga ba, also known as tshul khrims 'bar, 1038-1103) according to the oral instructions on loving-kindness, compassion, and Bodhicitta that he had received from Drom Tönpa ('brom ston pa, 1005-64), the chief disciple of Atisha (982-1054). The latter had received these instructions from the great Bodhicitta master Serlingpa. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma); listing of; quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Seven postures of Vairochana {snam snang chos bdun}. Seven postures adopted during meditation. [RY]

Seven precious substances (rin chen bdun). Ruby, sapphire, lapis, emerald, diamond, pearl and coral. Sometimes the list includes gold, silver, and crystal. [ZL] [RY]

Seven Profound Cycles (zab pa skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Profound Cycles; [LWx] [RY]

Seven pure aspects (bdun rnam dag). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]

Seven purities (dag pa bdun). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]

Seven qualities of a high rebirth (mtho ris yon tan bdun): noble family, beautiful bodily form, long life-span, no illness, good fortune, abundant wealth, and great intelligence. [RY]

seven royal emblems are the precious wheel, the precious jewel, the precious queen, the precious elephant, the precious minister, the precious horse, and the precious general. Here, Tashi Dedenpa is endowed with the seven noble riches (see chap.5, note 13). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven royal possessions (rgyal srid sna bdun). The precious wheel, jewel, minister, horse, elephant, queen, and general. [RY]

Seven Sections of Abhidharma (mngon pa sde bdun); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Seven Sections of Accomplishment (grub pa sde bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

seven special qualities of Mantrayana; listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven thought states resulting from delusion (gti mug las byung ba'i rtog pa bdun). See list under 'eighty inherent thought states' (rang bzhin brgyad cu'i rtog pa) [RY]

Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun) are: 1) Oral tradition (bka' ma) the early translated tripitaka and tantras passed on unbrokenly from master to disciple; 2) Earth Treasure (sa gter), revealed by the tertön; 3) Rediscovered Treasure (yang gter), revealed for the second time from an past treasure; 4) Mind Treasure (dgongs gter), revealed from the mind of the guru; 5) Hearing Lineage (snyan brgyud), received directly from an enlightened being; 6) Pure Vision (dag snang), received in a pure experience; and 7) Recollection (rjes dran), remembrance from a former life. [RY]

Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun): canonical lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage. [RY]

Seven Transmissions (bka' babs bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

Seven Treasures {mdzod bdun}. A writing in seven volumes by Longchen Rabjam. It covers all aspects of the Buddhist teachings and in particular all the subtleties of the Great Perfection. [RY]

Seven Treasuries (mdzod bdun), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Treasuries, (mdzod bdun) and the Three Great Chariots (ngal so skor gsum), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Treatises on Logic; [Pramanavarttika-karika and six other important texts]; (tshad ma sde bdun); Dharmakirti, 7th century. [PK] [RY]

seven types of attention (yid byed bdun); detailed expl.; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven types of Individual Liberation (so thar ris bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun) are: 1) In the context of the ground, emptiness is uncuttable by the klesha obscuration and 2) indestructible by the conceptual obscuration. 3) In the context of the path, its essence is true, 4) its nature is solid and 5) its function is stable. 6) In the context of the fruition, it is unattached to the klesha obscuration and 7) undefeatable or unobstructed by the conceptual obscuration. [RY]

Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Emptiness externally is 1) solid, firm, and unbreakable, internally 2) the core and 3) without hollowness, 4) not cutable into pieces, 5) not possibly split asunder or destroyed, 6) impossible to burn and 7) finally imperishable, it is therefore described as the vajra of emptiness. These seven vajra qualities, such as being uncuttable and indestructible, etc. are according to Jamdrak. [RY]

Seven Vajra Qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Incorruptibility [sra ba] is one of seven so-called vajra attributes [rdo rje'i chos bdun] of the abiding nature of reality. The other attributes are invulnerability [mi chod pa], indestructibility [mi shigs pa], authenticity [bden pa], stability [brtan pa], unobstructibility [thogs pa med pa], and invincibility [ma pham pa]. See Buddhahood Without Meditation, Richard Barron, trans. [Padma Publishing, 1994], pp. 33-34. [RY]

seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); another listing of; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

SEVEN WAYS OF TRANSMISSION (bka' babs bdun). Canonical or oral lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage.[AL] [RY]

Seven Wheels of Kshitigarbha Sutra (sa snying 'khor lo bdun gyi mdo). [RY]

seven-branch prayer (yan lag bdun pa). 1) Prostration as an antidote to pride, 2) offering as an antidote to miserliness, 3) confession and repentance as an antidote to the three poisons, 4) joy at others' happiness and virtues as an antidote to jealousy, 5) the request that the Wheel of Dharma be turned as a purification for having abandoned the Dharma in the past, 6) the prayer that the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and spiritual masters remain in this world as a purification for having upset one's teacher, and 7) dedication of merit as an antidote to wrong views. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

sevenfold greatness (chen po bdun); of Mahayana, listing of [LW1] [RY]

Sevenfold Pointing-out Instruction (ngo sprod bdun pa). [EMP] [RY]

Sevenfold posture of Vairochana (rnam snang chos bdun). See (‘seven-point posture…’) - This positon is described as the legs in full lotus, the spine straight, the shoulders broadened, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose.[EMP] [RY]

SEVENFOLD PURITY (dag pa bdun). Same as the seven branches: Prostrating, making offerings, confessing, rejoicing, requesting to turn the Wheel of the Dharma, beseeching not to pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit for the welfare of all beings.[AL] [RY]

seven-point posture of vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana, the so-called "lotus posture," the right foot over the left thigh. 2) The hands closed into fists, and with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows are then locked straight. (One variation of this is to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides; another is to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight and erect, "like a pile of golden coins." 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking and unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p. 41. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven-point Posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). A certain meditation posture to be learned through oral instructions. [RY]

seven-point posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left. 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins. 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking, unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p.41-2. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven-point posture of Vairocana; (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left., 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees.), 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward., 4) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins.", 5) The chin should be tucked in slightly towards the throat., 6) The tip of the tongue should be curled up to touch the palate., 7) The eyes should be kept unwaveringly focused at a distance of l2 fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose, without blinking. [MR]

Seven-rebirth pills (skye bdun ril bu) are prepared from sacred substances including originally, it is said, the flesh of a person reborn seven successive lifetimes as a brahmin. The mere taste of these is said to shut the doors of rebirth in the lower realms of samsara. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

seventeen abodes of the Realm of Form (gzugs khams gnas ris bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seventeen abodes of the Realms of Form (gzugs khams kyi gnas ris bcu bdun). The four Dhyana Realms of three each plus the five Pure Abodes. For details, see Mipham Rinpoche's Gateway to Knowledge. [RY]

Seventeen Dzogchen Tantras (rdzogs chen gyi rgyud bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seventeen tantras {rgyud bcu bdun}. The tantras of the extremely profound innermost unsurpassed cycle of pith instructions of Atiyoga. [RY]

Seventy Admonitions, lit. the Seventy Verses ending with "Ang" (ang yig bdun bcu pa), is spiritual advice by Karak Gomchung that condenses the essence of the Kadampa teachings. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seventy Verses on Emptiness; Shunyatasaptati-karika; (stong nyid bdun cu pa); Nagarjuna, 1st-2nd century. [PK] [RY]

seventy-two Palgöns [LW1] [RY]

Sey, Chak and Dung (bse lcags dung). [ZL] [RY]

Seyna-lek Jing-yön (sad na legs 'jing yon). [ZL] [RY]

sgeg pa rdo rje - wo1 253 life story [RY]

sgrub sde - Mahayoga wo1 258- [RY]

sgyud sde - Mahayoga wo1 -258 [RY]

sha gzan, a fully grown sheep (i.e., at least three years old). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal : 1594-1651 [MR]

Shabdrung Rinpoche. See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]

Shabdrung Rinpoche; another name of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; [LWx] [RY]

Shabkar - In his History of the Great Monastery of Rongpo (RO, p.646), Jigme Thekcho speaks of twenty-two major works of Shabkar: nine "Emanated Scriptures" (sprul pa'i glegs bam), three "Excellent Discourses" (legs bshad), three "Dharma Discourses" (chos bshad), three "Songs on the View" (lta mgur), and four "Autobiographical Songs" (rnam mgur). However, he does not identify them individually. The nine "Emanated Scriptures" have been reviewed above. The three "Excellent Discourses" are The Self-arising Sun (legs bshad nyi ma rang shar), The Golden Scalpel (legs bshad gser gyi thur ma), and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (legs bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). In his autobiography, Shabkar mentions four, not three, "Dharma Discourses": The Beneficial Sun (chos bshad gzhan phan nyi ma), The Beneficial Moon (chos bshad gzhan phan zla ba), The Beneficial Jewel (chos bshad gzhan phan nor bu) and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (chos bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). The three "Songs on the View" may correspond to the trilogy of The Flight of the Garuda. The identification of the four "Autobiographical Songs" is also unclear, although here and there in the autobiography Shabkar offers summaries of his life (for example, in chapters 11 and 15). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shabkar (zhabs dkar). Literally, 'White Feet.' The name of Tsogdruk Rangdrol given to him because wherever he placed his feet the area became 'white' or virtuous. [RY]

Shabkar Tsogdruk Rangdrol (zhabs dkar tshogs drug rang grol): 1781-1851 [MR]

Shaci (legs brjod ma). (bde sogs), 'Divine Power', wife of shakra or Indra. [RY]

Shailendra - Dynasty of Buddhist kings, originally from Java, who took control of Shrivijaya [RY]

Shaking Samsara From Its Depths ('khor ba sdong sprugs). [ZL] [RY]

Shakputri (shak pu tri). The son of King Jah and lineage holder of both Mahayoga and Anu Yoga. He is also known as Indrabhuti the Younger and Master Lawapa. [ZL] [RY]

Shakra (brgya byin). Ruler of the gods of the lower heavens of the Desire Realm, who dwells in the immense Vaijayanta palace on the summit of Mount Meru. Sometimes referred to as Indra. [RY]

Shakti. Divine energy or power, personified as female in Hindu Tantra. The term is never used for female deities in Buddhist Tantra, and would for most of them be inappropriate, though Tara might be a exception. [RY]

Shakya - the clan into which the Buddha was born; their lands in northern India bordered on Nepal. The Shakyas were destroyed by neighboring peoples during the Buddha's lifetime. [RY]

Shakya (sha kya). The name of the family clan into which Buddha Shakyamuni was born. practitioners are often given Shakya as a part of their Buddhist name. [ZL] [RY]

Shakya Devi, the daughter of a Nepalese King. [Daki] [RY]

Shakya Prava [LW1] [RY]

Shakya Senge (sha kya seng ge). One of the eight manifestations of Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]

Shakya Senge; [LWx] [RY]

Shakya Senge; one of the eight manifestations [LW1] [RY]

Shakya Shri (sha kya shr'i.). A Tibetan mahasiddha of the 19th century belong chiefly to the Drukpa Kagyu lineage. [RY]

Shakya Shri: 1127 or 45-1225 [MR]

Shakya Shri: 1127-1225. A great pandita. [RY]

Shakyabodhi (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

Shakyadevi (sha kya de wi). The daughter of the Nepalese king Punyedhara. She is one of the five chief female disciples of Padmasambhava. Since her mother died during her birth, she was abandoned in a charnel ground and brought up by monkeys. Having been accepted as Padmasambhava's worthy companion, she was his consort for the practice of the nine divinities of Vishuddha in the Cave of Yanglesh" where they displayed the manner of achieving the vidyadhara level of mahamudra. Shakyadevi attained the accomplishment of the female buddha Mamaki and finally achieved the indestructible rainbow body. [ZL] [RY]

Shakyamuni (sha kya thub pa). 'The Sage of the Shakyas,' Buddha Shakyamuni, our historical buddha. [ZL] [RY]

Shakyamuni Buddha - () The sage of the Shakyas; the historical Buddha, born in Kapilvastu; the fourth Buddha of the Bhadrakalpa and seventh Buddha of the present era [RY]

Shakyaprabha; (sha kya 'od) Born in Kashmir, he was a disciple of Punyakirti and Shatiprabha. He wrote several treatises on Vinaya. [MR]

Shakyas - The people of the small republican kingdom north of Magadha where the Buddha was born [RY]

Shalmali of Iron (lcags kyi shal ma li). [ZL] [RY]

Shalu Ridugpa Losel Tenkyong: 1804 [MR]

Shamanism (bon 'gyer). In this book the term has the negative connotation of rituals performed for selfish or superficial mundane aims. [ZL] [RY]

Shamar Chen-ngawa Chökyi Trakpa (zhwa dmar spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa, 1453-1524), the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa. Born in Kangmar in Domey, he became a disciple of the seventh Karmapa Chötrak Gyatso (karma pa chos grags rgya mtsho, 1450-1506). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shamar Konchok Yanlag (1525-1583) was the fifth bearer of the Shamar crown and the disciple and lineage holder of the eighth Karmapa, Mikyo Dorje. [RY]

Shamar Trisur Garwang Gyatso (zhwa dmar khri zur gar dbang rgya mtsho). See GC, vol. 4, pp. 133-7. Wondrous signs indicated that he was the reincarnation of the eighth Shamar, Palchen Chökyi Dondrup (1695-1732), and he was enthroned at Yangpachen. However, when another reincarnation was recognized, he left the throne and remained at Namseling (rnam sras gling); hence his title of "retired" Shamar (zur pa). His main teacher was Gampo Kunzang Ngedön Wangpo (sgam po kun bzang nges don dbang po). He displayed a vast activity for the benefit of the Dharma and sentient beings, and lived fifty-eight years. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shamar: IV Chökyi Dragpa; 1453-1524, (spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa);, the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa, born in Kangmar in Domey. He became disciple of the Seventh Karmapa: VII Chötrag Gyatso; (ka rma pa chos grags rgya mthso;, 1450-1506). [MR]

SHAMATHA (zhi gnas) 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought.[AL] [RY]

Shamatha (zhi gnas). 'Calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

shamatha (zhi gnas). See also nine means of mental stillness; and vipashyana; literal meaning; obstacles for the cultivation of; of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness [LW1] [RY]

Shamatha (zhi gnas). Stillness, literally 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided. It can also mean the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas) is the practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med) is the act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and Dzogchen and should not be mistaken for 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö.[Primer] [RY]

shamatha and vipashyana [LWx] [RY]

Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). [RY]

Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Vajrayana practice, this term is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of enlightenment. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]

shamatha of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness; [LWx] [RY]

Shamatha state of cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Mahayana or Vajrayana practice, this state is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of the enlightenment of the buddhas. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]

Shamatha that delights the tathagatas (de bzhin gshegs dgyes/ dge'i zhi gnas). The shamatha state at the first bhumi which is embraced with insight into emptiness. [RY]

Shamatha with attributes (mtshan bcas zhi gnas). [RY]

Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas). The practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. [RY]

Shamatha without attributes (mtshan med zhi gnas). [RY]

Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med). The act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and should not be mistaken for being 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö. [RY]

shamatha; obstacles for the cultivation of [LWx] [RY]

S continued - S3


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

-A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z -


--Richard 13:12, 12 August 2008 (EDT)