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T continued - T continued - T1 - T continued - T2 - T continued - T3 - T continued - T4 - T continued - T5 - T continued - T6


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Tersar (gter gsar). Recent /new treasures. Ex: Chokling Tersar, Dudjom Tersar. [RY]

Tersar. [RY]

Tersey Choktrul Rinpoche (gter sras mchog sprul rin po che). A great lama and brother of Samten Gyatso. [RY]

Tersey Rinpoche (gter sras rin po che). A great lama and brother of Samten Gyatso. For details, see The Life and Teaching of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Tertön (gter ston). A revealer of hidden treasures, concealed mainly by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal. [RY]

Tertön (gter ston). A revealer of hidden treasures, concealed mainly by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal. [ZL] [RY]

TERTÖN (gter ston). A revealer of hidden treasures, concealed mainly by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal.[AL] [RY]

Tertön (gter ston). A revealer of hidden treasures, concealed mainly by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal.[Primer] [RY]

tertön (gter ston); expl. of treasure master [LW1] [RY]

Tertön Dechen Barwai Dorje: 1836-1920 [MR]

Tertön Dechen Barwai Dorje: 1836-1920. [RY]

Tertön Dudul Dorje (bdud 'dul rdo rje): 1615-1672 [MR]

tertön kings, five (gter ston rgyal po lnga), listing of [LW1] [RY]

Tertön Mingyur Dorje (gter ston mi 'gyur rdo rje): 1645-1667 [MR]

Tertön Nyida Özer, Legden Dorje (nyi zla od zer legs ldan rdo rje): 1512-1625 [MR]

Tertön Nyima Trakpa: 17th century [MR]

Tertön Sangye Lama (sangs rgyas bla ma): 1000-1080 [MR]

Tertön Sogyal, Lerablingpa: 1856- [MR]

TESTAMENT OF PADMA (padma'i bka' chems). Revealed by the great tertön Nyang Ral, and presumably identical with the medium-length version of the Sanglingma biography of Padmasambhava, an English translation of which is published as The Lotus-Born (Shambhala Publications, 1993).[AL] [RY]

Thabshe Drubpa. (thabs shes grub pa) Composed by the Indian siddha Yanlag Mepey Dorje, (yan lag med pa'i rdo rje), himself a disciple of Mahasukhanatha (dgon po bde ba chen po). [RY]

thag rgyang gang do, lit, "the distance of two rope lengths," corresponding to approximately ten arm spans, or 150 feet. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thalgyur (thal 'gyur). An important maha ati tantra. [RY]

Thalgyur Root Tantra (thal 'gyur rtsa ba'i rgyud). The chief Dzogchen tantra of the Instruction Section (man ngag sde). [RY]

Thamal gyi shepa (tha mal gyi shes pa). The Tibetan for 'ordinary mind.' [RY]

Thangka (thang ka) Skt pata. A painting on cloth. [RY]

Thangtong Gyalpo's Oral Transmission (thang ston snyan rgyud), see Translator's Introduction, p.xxi. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thantong Gyalpo: 1385-1510, or 1361-1485 (in namthar), or 1385-1464 /or 1384-1501 [MR] Thar Drupche. [RY]

Thatness (de nyid). The nature of phenomena and mind. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

thatness of deity (lha'i de kho na nyid) . One of sngags kyi yan lag lnga [RY]

thatness of emanation and absorption ('phro 'du'i kho na nyid) . One of sngags kyi yan lag lnga [RY]

thatness of guhyamantra (gsang sngags kyi kho na nyid) . One of sngags kyi yan lag lnga [RY]

thatness of recitation (bzlas brjod kyi kho na nyid) . One of sngags kyi yan lag lnga [RY]

thatness of self (bdag gi kho na nyid) . One of sngags kyi yan lag lnga [RY]

Thaton - Capital city of southern Burma; early Theravadin center [RY]

Thayenchi (known as rtse gzhung in Tibetan) is a mountain retreat in Bakhog area (ba khog), near Chuzang Monastery (chu bzang dgon). One speaks of the big and the small Thayenchi (tha yan chi che chung, see AC vol.1, p.48). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Biography of Namkha Jigme (grub pa'i dbang phyug dam pa dpal chen nam mkha' 'jigs med mchog gi rnam par thar pa snying por dril ba skal bzang thar pa 'khrid pa'i ded dpon), The Torch That Illuminates the Graded Path (lam rim gsal ba'i sgron me), A Treatise on the View (legs bshad nyi ma rang shar), The Many-stringed Lute (springs yig pi wang rgyud mangs), Opening the Door of Compassion (snying rje sgo 'byed), Opening the Door of Faith (dad pa'i sgo 'byed), The Song to Rejoice Lobzang (blo bzang dgyes pa'i glu dbyangs), (grangs 'drin me tog phreng ba blo gsal gzhon nu'i mgul rgyan), The Song of Remembering My Mother (a ma dran pa'i mgur), The Spontaneously Arising Sun of Happiness (bde skyid nyi ma rang shar), The Instruction That Alone Frees All (gdams pa gcig shes kun grol), Commentary upon the Three Sentences that Strike to the Vital Point (tshig gsum gnad rdegs kyi 'grel ba), Advice to My Disciples (bu slob zhal gdams), and Advice to My Benefactors (yon bdag zhal gdams). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Clear Mirror which is found in the second volume of Kagye Desheg Dupa. [Daki] [RY]

The Easy Path (bde lam), see chap.2, note 30. The Swift Path (myur lam), another of the Eight Great Scriptures on the Graded Path, was written by the second Panchen Lama, Lobzang Yeshe (blo bzang ye shes, 1663-1737). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Eight Commands, Union of the Sugatas (bka' brgyad bde gshegs 'dus pa), rediscovered by Nyang Ral Nyima Öser (nyang ral nyi ma 'od zer, 1136-1204). This is the first and most important of the terma cycles based on the Eight Commands (sgrub pa bka' brgyad). On the life-story of Nyang Ral, see NS, pp. 755-9. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Gilded Palace see The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity

The Marvelous Emanated Scriptures (ngo mtshar sprul pa'i glegs bam), see Appendix 5. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Paramita vehicle (phar phyin gyi theg pa) is the Mahayana system of the gradual path through the five paths and ten bhumis according to the Prajnaparamita scriptures. See also 'six paramitas.'[AL] [RY]

the prince dies. elder brother tho gan the mur brings to sman rtse [RY]

The Sublime Continuum; Uttaratantra-shastra; (rgyud bla ma); Maitreya-Asanga, 4th century. [PK] [RY]

The Swift Fulfillment of Wishes (bsam pa myur 'grub ma). Unidentified. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

The Three Lands of Ngari in Tö (stod mnga ri skor gsum):. These are 1) Gugey Ya'i Kor (gu ge gya' yi sKor), the Slate Land of Gugey; 2) Puhrang Khang gi Kor (spu rang gangs kyi sKor), the Snow Land of Puhrang; 3) Ruthop Chap gi Kor (ru thop chab kyi sKor), the Water Land of Ruthop. According to The Ocean-like Annals (deb ther rgya mtsho), History of Amdo by Konchog Rabgye: 1) Purang, Mang Yul, and Sangkar (spu rang, mang yul, zang dkar), making the first land; 2) Li, Drusha, and Balti (li, bru sha, sbal ti), making the second land; and 3) Shang Shung, Triteh and T"meh (zhang zhung, khri te, stod smad), making the third land. [MR]

The Three Ridges /Heights of Dokham (smad mdo kham sgang gsum): are 1) Markham in Upper Kham (smar khams in mdo khams); 2) Yermo Thang in Lower Kham, Amdo (g.yer mo thang in mdo smad); and 3) Gyi Thang in Tshongkha (gyi thang in tsong kha) [MR]

The very top of a stupa consists of thirteen Dharma wheels of decreasing diameters, finally surmounted by a moon crescent and a sun. These thirteen "wheels" are sometimes thirteen squares, as in the case of Bodhnath stupa. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thekchen Lingpa Karma Drodön Tarchin (thek chen gling pa karma 'gro don mthar phyin, 1700-75/6 see GC, vol. Ga, p. 218), also known as Tertön Drime Lingpa (gter ston dri med gling pa), born in Zurkar (zur mkhar) as a descendant of Tertön Dechen Lingpa (bde chen gling pa). He was the incarnation of Guru Padmasambhava's disciple Gyalwa Chöyang (rgyal ba mchog dbyangs) and the immediate incarnation of Rongpa Tertön Dudul Lingpa (rong pa gter ston bdud 'dul gling pa). He became a disciple of Rigdzin Thukchog Dorje (rig 'dzin thugs mchog rdo rje) from whom he received the transmission of the Kunzang Nyingthig (kun bzang snying thig) of Tennyi Lingpa (bstan gnyis gling pa, 1480-1535). He was gifted with clairvoyance and had visions in which he remembered his former births as Melong Dorje (me long rdo rje, 1243-1303), Dechen Lingpa (bde chen gling pa), Dudul Lingpa (bdud 'dul gling pa) and others. He lived a contemplative life in solitary places and revealed several termas in Trak Yangdzong (sgrags yang rdzong) and other places. His main disciples were Jigme Lingpa (rig 'dzin 'jigs med gling pa), Kunzang Dechen Gyalpo (kun bzang bde chen rgyal po), Trati Ngakchang (bkra ti sngags 'chang), Chaksampa Tendzin Yeshe Lhundrup (lcags zam pa bstan 'dzin ye shes lhun grub) and the Seventh Dalai Lama (skal bzang rgya mtsho). His descendants are still found at Zurkar Lhadeng (zur mkhar lha sdeng). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thekchog Dorje The fourteenth Karmapa,(theg mchog rdo rje, 1798-1868). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thekchog Dorje, (theg mchog rdo rje), Karmapa XIV: 1798-1868 [MR]

Theravada - The school of Buddhism that predominates in Southeast Asia, tracing its lineage to the early Sthaviras [RY]

Theu-rang (the'u rang). A type of spirits who ride goats and as patrons of blacksmiths carry a bellows and hammer. [ZL] [RY]

Thien - Vietnamese form of Ch'an teachings, introduced in the sixth century; together with Pure land became dominant form of Buddhism [RY]

Thinking and stillness (gnas 'gyu). Presence and absence of thought activity. [RY]

Third Council (bsdu ba gsum pa) - Council convened at time of Kaniska to authenticate the teachings; in the Theravada the Third Council was convened at Pataliputra under Ashoka [RY]

Third Dhyana Realm. See Dhyana Realms [LW1] [RY]

Third empowerment (dbang gsum pa). The third of the four empowerments in the Anuttara Yoga system to introduce the unity of bliss and emptiness. [RY]

Third Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gsum pa). The last teachings of the Buddha including the sutras on the definitive meaning placing emphasis on buddha nature, the unity of luminosity and emptiness devoid of constructs..[Primer] [RY]

Third Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gsum pa). The last teachings of the Buddha including the sutras on the definitive meaning. [RY]

Third Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gsum pa). The teachings by the Buddha placing emphasis on buddha nature, the unity of luminosity and emptiness devoid of constructs. [RY]

Third Turning of the Wheel of Dharma. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]

Thirteen bhumis (sa bcu gsum). According to the New Schools there are an additional three stages which are actually degrees of manifesting complete enlightenment. See Tsele Natsok Rangdrol's The Lamp of Mahamudra, Shambhala Publications, 1989. [RY]

Thirteen great root texts of philosophy (gzhung chen bcu gsum). [RY]

Thirteen major philosophical texts (gzhung chen bcu gsum). The fundamental treatises on Buddhist philosophy covering the topics of Vinaya, the bodhisattva trainings, Maitreya's five treatises covering Prajnaparamita etc., as well as Abhidharma, and Madhyamaka. [RY]

Thirteen Tantras of the Goddess (lha mo'i rgyud lung bcu gsum). [ZL] [RY]

Thirty Seven-fold Practice of a Bodhisattva, see Translator's Introduction, p.xxi. [MR-ShabkarNotes] thirty-seven aspect offering. The thirty-seven aspect offering is not included within either the original sadhana or the edition that Kongtrül later compiled. It is however within the preliminary text made by Kongtrül, though in the Tibetan edition only the beginning is given as it is assumed that practitioners would know it by heart. It can be found within, for example,the Mahamudra preliminary practices. [Peter Roberts]

thirty-seven factors conducive to enlightenment (byang phyogs kyi chos so bdun); summary of [LW1] [RY]

thirty-two major countries (yul chen so gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

Thirty-two major marks (mtshan gsum bcu so gnyis). The perfect marks of a buddha. [RY]

Thirty-two thought states resulting from anger (zhe sdang las byung ba'i rtog pa so gsum). See list under the 'eighty innate thought states.' [RY]

Thoding / (mtho lding) - Monastery in Gu ge in western Tibet where Rin chen bzang po and Atisha both worked. [RY]

Thögal (thod rgal), the most advanced practice of the Great Perfection (rdzogs chen, see Appendix 1). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thomi Sambhota to India: 632 ?? [MR]

Thöngwa Donden, Karmapa VI: 1416-1453. [RY]

Thon-mi sambhota - Minister sent to India or Kashmir bv Tibetan king Srong-btsan sgam-po to study Sanskrit and devise written Tibetan language. [Tarthang]

Thonmi Sambhota / (thon mi sam bho ta) - Minister sent to India or Kashmir by Tibetan king Srong btsan sgam po to study Sanskrit and devise written Tibetan language [RY]

Thought arising as meditation (rnam rtog bsgom du 'char ba). [RY]

Thousand buddhas of this aeon. [RY]

Thrangu Monastery. [RY]

Thrangu Rinpoche, quotation by [LW1] [RY]

Thrangu Rinpoche. [RY]

Thread-cross (mdos). A tantric ritual involving structures of sticks with colored yarn used to appease mundane spirits. [ZL] [RY]

Thread-cross talisman (mdos): an elaborate structure made of threads of various colors arranged as a three-dimensional device, it represents the body and its various elements (earth, water, fire, wind, and space). The mdos, accompanied by various other objects symbolizing great riches, is offered as a substitute for a person and his or her possessions in a special ritual, the aim of which is to satisfy harmful spirits intent on stealing the person's life or prosperity. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Thread-crosses (mdos). A tantric ritual involving structures of sticks with colored yarn used to appease mundane spirits. [EMP] [RY]

Threatening forefinger, tarjani, (sdigs mdzub). A gesture of threat, point the forefinger. [RY]

Three Abodes of Goodness (dge gnas gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three Abodes of Radiance ('od gsal gyi gnas gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three abodes. Under, upon and above the ground. [Peter Roberts]

three activities connected with spreading the Dharma (chos kyi las gsum). Exposition ('chad), debate (rtsod), and composition (rtsom). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three adoptions (khyer so gsum). The three adoptions are the transmutation of all form, sound and mind into the path. [Peter Roberts]

three ancestral Dharma kings (chos rgyal mes dbon rnam gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three baskets (Skt. Tripitaka, Tib. sde snod gsum). Vinaya ('dul ba), sutra (mdo) and abhidharma (mngon pa). They are included in the Tibetan canonical collection called Kangyur. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three bindus of the Mahasandhi. Mahasandhi. Tibetan: rdzogs chen. "The Great Completion". The highest teaching within the Nyingma tradition, it was introduced into Tibet primarily by Vimalamitra and Vairochana in the eighth century. Its three "bindus", which means vital drops or essences, are the three sections of its teachings, at one time existing in Tibet as separate lineages: The sems sde "Mind Section", the klong sde "Expanse Section" and the man ngag sde "Instructions section". [Peter Roberts]

three bodies or kayas (sku gsum). The dharmakaya (Tib. chos kyi sku), or absolute body; the sambhogakaya (Tib. longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku), or body of enjoyment; and the nirmanakaya (sprul pa'i sku), or manifested body. They correspond to the empty nature of mind and of all phenomena; the luminous clarity of wisdom; and the unobstructed manifestation of compassion. These are known as the three bodies (trikaya) of a Buddha. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Brahma Abodes (tshangs gnas gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three causal vehicles (rgyu'i theg pa gsum); listing of [LW1] [RY]

three classes within atiyoga (rdzogs chen sde gsum). 1) the mind class (sems sde), 2) the space class (klong sde), and 3) the class of pith or extraordinary instructions (man ngag sde). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Collections (sde snod gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three conditions for the purity of meat (gnas gsum dag pa'i sha). There are three conditions that make the eating of meat less evil 1) that one has not oneself killed an animal for meat, 2) or asked someone to kill it, 3) or taken the meat of an animal that has been killed specifically for oneself, even though one did not ask for it to be slaughtered. These are defined according to Hinayana sutras. According to Mahayana sutras the eating of meat, at the cost of animals' suffering, is unacceptable (see Appendix 5, note 6, and Emanated Scriptures of Compassion). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Confidences (yid ches gsum) - According to H.H. Khyentse Rinpoche, the three confidences are 1) the confidence that the goal of the practice resides in oneself (bsgrub bya rang la bzhugs pa yid ches), 2) the confidence in the extraordinary instructions which allow one to attain this goal (sgrub byed kyi man ngag la yid ches), and 3) the confidence in the spiritual master (bla ma la yid ches). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three confidences (yid ches gsum). 1) the confidence that the goal of the practice resides in oneself (bsgrub bya rang la bzhugs pa yid ches), 2) the confidence in the extraordinary instructions which allow one to attain this goal (sgrub byed kyi man ngag la yid ches), and 3) the confidence in the spiritual master (bla ma la yid ches). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Cycles of Dohas (do ha skor gsum, T 2263) comprises the three main "songs of realization" of the great siddha Saraha. They are the Doha for the King, the Doha for the Queen, and the Doha for the Subjects. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Cycles of Oral Lineage;, (snyan brgyud skor gsum), are the three main lineages of the Oral or Whispered Transmission of the Chakrasamvara teachings of the Kagyu Tradition. The three are: 1) The Dagpo Nyengyu (dwags po snyan brgyud), the Oral Lineage of Dagpo Lharje, Gampopa, the most extensive form; 2) The Rechung Nyengyu (ras chung snyan brgyud), the Oral Transmission of Rechungpa, the middle form; and 3) The Ngamdzong Nyengyu (ngam rgzong snyan brgyud), the condensed form. [MR]

Three Defects (skyon gsum). When listening to a Dharma talk: Not paying attention, not remembering, being mixed with impure motivation. [RY]

Three defects of the vessel (snod kyi skyon gsum). When listening to a Dharma talk: Not paying attention, not remembering, being mixed with impure motivation. [RY]

Three Dharma robes (chos gos gsum). [RY]

three Dharma Wheels of the causal teachings of the Philosophical Vehicles. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]

three diamond-hard, or vajra-like, resolutions (rdo rje gsum). 1) The vajra of unswerving determination: no matter what our parents, friends, or anyone else may think or say, no matter what adverse conditions there may be, nothing can deter us from our resolve to practice the Dharma. 2) The vajra of indifference to what others may think of us: Once we have achieved our goal--to practice Dharma--even if people have a poor opinion of us, criticize us for "wasting our time," or slander us, we should not care about it in the least. 3) The vajra of wisdom: awareness of the ultimate truth, which should accompany us at all times. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Districts of Ngari [LW1] [RY]

three divisions of ngari in tö (stod mnga' ris skor gsum). According to CN, they are: 1) The Dharma Land of Mang Yul (mang yul chos kyi skor); 2) The Auspicious Bönpo Land of Guge (gu ge g.yung drung bon gi skor); and 3) The Snow Land of Purang (pu rang /spu hreng gangs kyi skor). Alternately, these three have been defined as 1) Guge Ya'i Kor (gu ge g.ya' yi skor), the Slate Land of Guge; 2) Purang Khang gi Kor (spu hreng gangs kyi skor), the Snow Land of Purang; 3) Ruthop Chap gi Kor (ru thob chab kyi skor) the Water Land of Ruthop. According to AC, vol.1, p.3, the three divisions are 1) Purang, Mang Yul, and Zanskar (spu hreng, mang yul, zangs dkar), making the first division; 2) Li, Gilgit, and Balti (li, bru sha, sbal ti), making the second division; and 3) Shang Shung, Triteh and Lower Tö (zhang zhung, khri te /bri ste, stod smad), making the third division. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

THREE DOORS (sgo gsum). Body, speech and mind; thought, word and deed.[AL] [RY]

three doors (sgo gsum). Body, speech, and mind. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three doors; [LWx] [RY]

Three excellencies (dam pa gsum). The excellent beginning of bodhicitta, the excellent main part of nonconceptualization and the excellent conclusion of dedicating the merit. [RY]

Three excellencies {dam pa gsum}. The beginning, bodhicitta; the main part, meditation free of conceptualization; and the conclusion, dedication. [RY]

Three existences: The world beneath the ground, e.g nagas. The world upon the ground, e.g. humans. The world above the ground, e.g. the devas of the paradises. [Peter Roberts]

three experiences (snang gsum). See also tendencies for [LW1] [RY]

three experiences of transference (pho ba) [LW1] [RY]

Three extensive and medium length versions of the Prajnaparamita teachings (bka' shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa rgyas 'bring rnam gsum). [ZL] [RY]

Three families (rigs gsum). The vajra, padma and sugata families. [RY] Three families (rigs gsum). Vajra, padma, and tathagata. When referring to the 'lords of the three families' they are Manjushri, Avalokiteshvara, and Vajrapani. [RY]

three families, lords of the (rigs gsum mgon po). The Buddhas Manjusri, Avalokitesvara, and Vajrapani, the respective manifestations of wisdom, compassion, and power. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Family Lords (rigs gsum mgon po). Avalokiteshvara, Manjushri and Vajrapani. [RY]

Three fields of objects (yul gsum). (snang yul, dbang yul, yid kyi yul). The form of the deity appearing as either a perceptual object, in the experience of the senses by someone else, or as a mental object. [RY]

Three Forefather Dharma Kings (chos rgyal mes dbon rnam gsum) [LWx] [RY]

Three Forefather Dharma Kings (chos rgyal mes dpon rnam gsum). [RY]

three fundamental aspects of the buddhist teachings. 1) Renunciation (nges byung), the root of the Hinayana and therefore the foundation of all subsequent vehicles, 2) compassion (snying rje), the driving force of the Mahayana, and 3) pure vision (dag snang), the extraordinary outlook of the Vajrayana. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three gates (sgo gsum) are the body, the speech, and the mind. All these enumerations (the three gazes, the three postures, the four lamps, the four visions and the three crucial points) refer to the esoteric practice of Thögal (thod rgal). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three gates of emancipation (rnam thar sgo gsum). Emptiness, signlessness, and wishlessness. [RY]

three gates of emancipation. See emancipations [LW1] [RY]

three Great Stupas in Kathmandu Valley - Bodhnath stupa or Jarung Khashor (bya rung kha shor, see note 28) and Svayambunath Stupa or Phagpa Shinkun ('phags pa shing kun) are two of the three Great Stupas in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The third one is the Takmo Lujin (stag mo lus sbyin, locally known as "Namobuddha"), erected near the place where the Buddha Sakyamuni, when he was born as a prince in one of his former lives, gave his body to feed a starving tigress. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Great Temples - lHa sa, Khra 'brug, and Ra mo che built by Srong btsan sgam po. [RY] Three Great Tertöns (gter chen gsum). Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo, Jamgön Kongtrül and Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Three great tertöns (gter stons chen po gsum) are Nyi ma 'od zer, chos kyi dbang phyug, and Rig 'dzin rgod ldem 'phru can. Nyang ral Nyi ma 'od zer (12th century) and Guru Chos kyi dbang phyug (13th century) are known as the Sun and Moon. gTer ma they discovered are called Upper and Lower treasures, or gter kha gong 'og. Rig 'dzin rgod ldem 'phru can (14th century) was editor and compiler of gter known as the Northern Treasures. [RY]

three great transmissions (brgyud pa chen po gsum); of the Nyingma School [LW1] [RY]

T continued - T2


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 13:18, 12 August 2008 (EDT)