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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Three hidden valleys. [Daki] [RY]

Three higher realms (mtho ris gsum). The worlds of human beings, demigods or asuras, and gods or devas. These realms are more pleasant than the lower realms of animals, hungry ghosts and hell beings, but are not places of lasting happiness since even the highest realms of the gods are still within samsara. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Three Hundred and Sixty Sacred Incantations (gzungs sum brgya drug cu). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Three incalculable aeons (bskal pa grangs med gsum). Incalculable refers to the number ten followed by 52 zeros. [RY]

Three Inner Tantras (nang rgyud sde gsum). Maha, Anu, and Ati Yoga. [RY]

Three Inner Tantras (nang rgyud sde gsum). Mahayoga, Anu Yoga, and Ati Yoga. These three sections of tantra are the special characteristics of the Nyingma School of the Early Translations. According to Jamgön Kongtrül the First, "The Three Inner Tantras are also known as the 'Vehicles of the Methods of Mastery' because they establish the way to experience that the world and beings are the nature of mind manifest as kayas and wisdoms, that everything is the 'indivisibility of the superior two truths,' and hereby ensuring that the practitioner will become adept in the method of gaining mastery over all phenomena as being great equality." The Three Inner Tantras are, respectively, also renowned as 'development, completion, and great perfection' or as 'tantras, scriptures, and instructions.' According to Mipham Rinpoche, the Three Inner Tantras reached Tibet through six different lines of transmission: 1) As perceived by ordinary people in Tibet, Padmakara, the Second Buddha, taught only the Instruction on the Garland of Views but bestowed both the profound and extensive empowerments and instructions of all of the Three Inner Tantras to his exceptional disciples including Sangye Yeshe, Rinchen Chok, Lui Wangpo of Khön, and many others, the oral lineages of which have continued unbroken until this very day. Moreover, the major part of his teachings were sealed as terma treasures for the benefit of followers in future generations. 2) When the great translator Vairochana extensively had received the profound teachings of the Great Perfection from the Twenty-five Panditas, especially from Shri Singha, he returned to Tibet and imparted the Mind Section five times, as well as the oral lineage of the Space Section, both of which are continued uninterruptedly. 3) The great pandita Vimalamitra arrived in Tibet and taught the Instruction Section chiefly to Tingdzin Sangpo of Nyang. This lineage was transmitted both orally and through terma treasures. 4) Sangye Yeshe of Nub received from four masters in India, Nepal and Drusha innumerable teachings headed by the important scriptures of Anu Yoga and Yamantaka. His lineage of the Scripture of the Embodiment of the Realization of All Buddhas is still unbroken. 5) Namkhai Nyingpo received the transmission of the teachings of Vishuddha from the Indian master Hungkara which he then spread in Tibet. 6) During following generations, incarnations of the king and the close disciples of Padmasambhava have, and still continue to do so, successively appeared, as great masters who at opportune times reveal the profound teachings that had been concealed as terma treasures, in order to ensure the supreme welfare of people in Tibet and all other countries, both temporarily and ultimately. [ZL] [RY]

Three Inner Tantras (nang rgyud sde gsum). See also tantras, statements, and instructions; definition of sugata essence; listing of [LW1] [RY]

three inner tantras (nang rgyud sde gsum). The tantras of Mahayoga, Anuyoga, and Atiyoga. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Inner Tantras (nang rgyud sde gsum); definition of sugata essence; listing of [LWx] [RY]

Three Jewels (dkon mchog gsum). The Precious Buddha, the Precious Dharma and the Precious Sangha. [ZL] [RY]

THREE JEWELS (dkon mchog gsum). The Precious Buddha, the Precious Dharma and the Precious Sangha. In The Light of Wisdom (Shambhala Publ.), Jamgön Kongtrül explains: "The Buddha is the nature of the four kayas and five wisdoms endowed with the twofold purity and the perfection of the twofold welfare. The Dharma is what is expressed, the unconditioned truth of total purification comprised of cessation and path, and that which expresses, the two aspects of statement and realization appearing as the names, words and letters of the teachings. The Sangha consists of the actual Sangha, the sons of the victorious ones abiding on the noble bhumis who are endowed with the qualities of wisdom and liberation, and the resembling Sangha who are on the paths of accumulation and joining as well as the noble shravakas and pratyekabuddhas."[AL] [RY]

Three Jewels (dkon mchog gsum); expl. of qualities; in the context of the lesser vehicles; objects of refuge; Precious Ones of Vajrayana [LW1] [RY]

Three Jewels (dkon mchog gsum); guru as theThree Precious Ones [LW1] [RY]

Three Jewels {dkon mchog gsum}. The Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. [RY]

three Jewels and three Roots. The Three Roots: The Tantric equivalent, or essence of the Three Jewels. They are the Guru, the Yidam Deity and thirdly, the Dakas, Dakinis and Dharma-Protectors. [Peter Roberts]

Three Kayas - The Mahayana recognizes the three aspects (Trikaya) of the Buddha: Dharmakaya (Chos kyi sku), lit. 'Dharma body'; Sambhogakaya (Longs spyod kyi sku), lit. 'Enjoyment body'; and Nirmanakaya (sPrul sku), lit. 'Representation body'. Dharmakaya is voidness and its realization, beyond time and space, and is pure transcending awareness. The Sambhogakaya, the pure enjoyment aspect of the Dhyanibuddhas, also represents the aspect of communication. The Nirmanakaya forms are embodiments taken by Buddhas among earthly beings in order to clarify the way to enlightenment. Rupakaya - The Sambhogakaya and the Nirmanakaya are sometimes known together as the Rupakaya (gZugs sku), lit. 'Form body'; all three kayas are sometimes considered aspects of a fourth body, called the Svabhavikakaya (Ngo bo nyid sku). [RY]

three kayas (sku gsum) are the dharmakaya (chos kyi sku), or absolute body; the sambhogakaya (longs spyod kyi sku), or body of enjoyment; and the nirmanakaya (sprul sku), or manifested body. They correspond respectively to the void, the luminous, and the compassionate aspects of a Buddha. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three kayas (sku gsum). Dharmakaya (chos sku) is the first of the three kayas, which is devoid of constructs, like space. The 'body' of enlightened qualities. Should be understood in three different senses, according to ground, path and fruition. Sambhogakaya (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku) means the 'body of perfect enjoyment.' In the context of the 'five kayas of fruition,' sambhogakaya is the semi-manifest form of the buddhas endowed with the 'five perfections' of perfect teacher, retinue, place, teaching and time which is perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the ten levels. Nirmanakaya (sprul sku) means 'emanation body' or 'form of magical apparition' and is the third of the three kayas. This aspect of enlightenment that can be perceived by ordinary beings. [Primer] [RY]

Three kayas (sku gsum). Dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. [RY]

Three kayas (sku gsum). Dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. The three kayas as ground are 'essence, nature, and expression,' as path they are 'bliss, clarity and nonthought,' and as fruition they are the 'three kayas of buddhahood.' [RY]

Three kayas (sku gsum). Dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. The three kayas as ground are 'essence, nature, and expression,' as path they are 'bliss, clarity and nonthought,' and as fruition they are the 'three kayas of buddhahood.' The three kayas of buddhahood are the dharmakaya which is free from elaborate constructs and endowed with the 'twenty-one sets of enlightened qualities;' the sambhogakaya which is of the nature of light and endowed with the perfect major and minor marks perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the levels; and the nirmanakaya which manifests in forms perceptible to both pure and impure beings. In the context of this book, the three kayas are sometimes Buddha Amitabha, Avalokiteshvara, and Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]

Three kayas (sku gsum). Dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. The three kayas as ground are 'essence, nature, and capacity'; as path they are 'bliss, clarity and nonthought,' and as fruition they are the 'three kayas of buddhahood.' The three kayas of buddhahood are the dharmakaya, which is free from elaborate constructs and endowed with the 'twenty-one sets of enlightened qualities;' the sambhogakaya, which is of the nature of light and endowed with the perfect major and minor marks perceptible only to bodhisattvas; and the nirmanakaya, which manifests in forms perceptible to both pure and impure beings. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

THREE KAYAS (sku gsum). Dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. The three kayas as ground are 'essence, nature, and expression,' as path they are 'bliss, clarity and nonthought,' and as fruition they are the 'three kayas of buddhahood.' The three kayas of buddhahood are the dharmakaya which is free from elaborate constructs and endowed with the 'twenty-one sets of enlightened qualities;' the sambhogakaya which is of the nature of light and endowed with the perfect major and minor marks perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the levels; and the nirmanakaya which manifests in forms perceptible to both pure and impure beings. [AL] [RY]

three kayas (sku gsum); of buddhahood; expl.; threefold wisdom [LW1] [RY]

Three kayas of buddhahood (sangs rgyas sku gsum). The dharmakaya is free from elaborate constructs and endowed with the '21 sets of enlightened qualities.' Sambhogakaya is of the nature of light and endowed with the perfect major and minor marks perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the bhumis. The nirmanakaya manifests in forms perceptible to both pure and impure beings. [RY]

Three kayas of fruition ('bras bu'i sku gsum). The dharmakaya is free from elaborate constructs and endowed with the '21 sets of enlightened qualities.' Sambhogakaya is of the nature of light and endowed with the perfect major and minor marks perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the bhumis. The nirmanakaya manifests in forms perceptible to both pure and impure beings. [RY]

three kindnesses (bka' drin gsum) according to the Mantrayana, of a spiritual master are as follows: to mature the disciple with an empowerment (dbang bskur), to expound the tantras (rgyud bshad), and to bestow pith instructions (man ngag ston). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three kindnesses of a spiritual master (bka' drin gsum). To mature the disciple with an empowerment (dbang bskur), to expound the tantras (rgyud bshad), and to bestow pith instructions (man ngag ston). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three kinds of celestial beings (lha gsum). The gods of the realms of desire, form, and no-form. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three kinds of ignorance (ma rig pa rnam gsum). Single identity ignorance, coemergent ignorance and conceptual ignorance. [RY]

three kinds of knowledge (shes rab rnam gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three kinds of mental nonvirtues. See ten nonvirtues [LW1] [RY]

Three kinds of miraculous powers (cho 'phrul gsum). The perfect deeds of a nirmanakaya buddha enacted through his body, speech and mind. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Three kinds of obscurations (sgrib pa gsum). The obscuration of disturbing emotions, the obscuration of dualistic knowledge, and the obscuration of tendencies or habitual patterns. [RY]

three kinds of physical nonvirtues. See ten nonvirtues [LW1] [RY]

Three kinds of pleasing actions (mnyes pa gsum) are to please by means of material things, service, and practice. The last is the most eminent of the three. The two first perfect the accumulation of merit and the latter the accumulation of wisdom. [RY]

Three kinds of pleasing actions (mnyes pa gsum). To please one's teacher by means of material things, service, and practice. [RY]

three kinds of pleasing actions (mnyes pa gsum); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Three levels of enlightenment (byang chub gsum). The attainment of the nirvana of an arhant, pratyekabuddha, and of a fully perfected buddha. [RY]

three levels of enlightenment (byang chub gsum); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Three levels of existence (srid pa gsum). Usually the same as the 'three realms.' [RY]

three levels of impure existence [LWx] [RY]

Three levels of wisdom; (shes rab gsum): 1) Conventional, worldly wisdom: Is basically the four traditional sciences, which are healing, logic, languages and crafts. 2) Ultimate, transworldly wisdom: Is the inner science based on the teachings of the sravakas and the pratyekabuddhas, and leads to recognition that physical aggregates are unclean, necessarily involve suffering, are impermanent and devoid of inherent existence. 3) The wisdom of realization: Is based upon the Mahayana teachings and leads to the thorough experiential understanding of the empty nature of phenomena, which are unoriginated, baseless and rootless. There are three other aspects to wisdom: the wisdom that realizes relative truth, and that is perfect knowledge of the whole phenomenal world and the way it manifests; the wisdom that realizes absolute truth, and that knows the empty nature of all phenomena; and the wisdom that unerringly accomplishes the welfare of beings. [MR]

three lineages (brgyud pa gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three lower realms (ngan song gsum). The realms of the denizens of the hells, of the tormented spirits, and of the animals. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three lower realms (ngan song gsum). The worlds of hell beings, hungry ghosts, and animals. [RY]

Three Main Points of the Path (lam gyi gtso bo rnam gsum), a short text by Tsongkhapa, belonging to the pith instruction section of the Kadampa teachings. The three main points are, as Jamgön Kongtrul says in his commentary, "The gold foundation of renunciation, on which rises the fabulously arranged Mount Meru and continents of Bodhicitta, upon which shines the brilliant sun of the wisdom of the perfect view." (See DZ, Vol. 4., pp. 435-88). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three mind poisons (dug gsum). Attachment, anger, and delusion. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Three mudras (phyag rgya gsum) are karma mudra (las kyi phyag rgya), samaya mudra (dam tshig gi phyag rgya) and jnana mudra (ye shes kyi phyag rgya), a mental consort. [RY]


Three mysteries (gsang ba gsum). The Vajra Body, Speech and Mind. [RY]

Three natures (rang bzhin gsum) (mtshan nyid gsum). The aspects of phenomena as set forth by the Cittamatra and Yogachara schools: the 'imagined,' the 'dependent,' and the 'absolute.' The imagined (kun brtags) is the two kinds of self-entity. The dependent (gzhan dbang) is the eight collections of consciousness. The absolute (yongs grub) is the empty nature of things, suchness. [RY]

three natures (rang bzhin gsum); among the Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma [LW1] [RY]

three notions ('du shes gsum); in regards to a master [LW1] [RY]

Three outer tantras (phyi rgyud gsum). Kriya, Upa, and Yoga. [RY]

Three Outer Tantras (phyi rgyud sde gsum); definition of sugata essence; listing of; of Mantrayana [LW1] [RY]

Three outer Tantras are the Kriya, Charya, and the Yoga Tantras. () The Kriya Tantras emphasize purification of body and speech through ritual and cleansing activities, establishing a relationship between the deity and the practitioner similar to the relationship of master and servant. Realization can be gained within sixteen human lifetimes. [RY]

three permissive conditions," see Appendix 5, note 6, and Shabkar's Emanated Scriptures of Compassion (snying rje sprul pa'i glegs bam). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three places (sa gsum) are the realms of celestial beings above the earth, of human beings upon the earth, and of the nagas below the earth. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three places (sa gsum). The realms of the celestial beings above the earth; of human beings upon the earth and of the nagas below the earth. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three planes; (sa gsum) : The realms of celestial beings above the earth, of human beings upon the earth, and of the nagas below the earth. [MR]

Three poisonous emotions (nyon mongs pa dug gsum). Attachment, anger, and delusion. [RY]

Three poisons (dug gsum). Desire, anger, and delusion. [RY]

three poisons or klesas (dug gsum). Desire, hatred, and confusion. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Precious Ones (dkon mchog gsum). The Precious Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. [RY]

Three Precious Ones. See Three Jewels [LW1] [RY]

Three profound empowerments (zab mo'i dbang gsum). They are also called "the three supreme empowerments" (mchog dbang gsum) and are the secret empowerment (gsang dbang), the wisdom empowerment (sher dbang) and the word empowerment (tshig dbang). [RY]

Three Protectors (rigs gsum mgon po) Avalokiteshvara, Vajrapani, and Manjushri. [RY] three pure bhumis; bodhichitta; summary of path [LW1] [RY]

Three pure conditions for eating meat;: That one does not kill an animal for meat, or ask someone to kill it, or take the meat of an animal that has been killed for oneself even though one did not ask for it. [MR]

three ranges of dokham (smad mdo khams sgang gsum). 1) Markham in Upper Kham (smar khams in mdo khams); 2) Yermo Thang in Lower Kham, Amdo (g.yer mo thang in mdo smad); and 3) Gyi Thang in Tsongkha (gyi thang in tsong kha). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Ranges of Dokham (smad mdo khams sgang gsum): are 1) Markham in Upper Kham (smar khams in mdo khams); 2) Yermo Thang in Lower Kham; Amdo (g.yer mo thang in mdo smad) Domey; and 3) Gyi Thang in Tsongkha (gyi thang in tsong kha). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three realms (khams gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three realms (khams gsum). The samsaric realms of Desire, Form and Formlessness. [RY]

Three realms (khams gsum). The samsaric realms of Desire, Form and Formlessness. [ZL] [RY]

Three rituals (cho ga gsum). Three steps in visualization of a deity: seat with seed syllable, attribute, and deity. [RY]

Three Roots - lama, yidam, dakini. The guru is the root of all blessing, the yidam is the root of all siddhi, and the dakini is the root of Buddha activity. [RY]

Three roots (rtsa ba gsum). Guru, Yidam and Dakini. The Guru is the root of blessings, the Yidam of accomplishment, and the Dakini of activity. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

THREE ROOTS (rtsa ba gsum). Guru, Yidam and Dakini. The Guru is the root of blessings, the Yidam of accomplishment, and the Dakini of activity. [AL] [RY]

three roots (rtsa ba gsum). The guru (bla ma); deva, or meditational deity (yi dam); and the dakini (mkha' 'gro). They are the roots, respectively, of blessings, of spiritual accomplishment, and of enlightened activity. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Roots (rtsa ba gsum); expl. the special Precious Ones; listing of; objects of refuge [LW1] [RY]

three Roots. The Peaceful Guru (Padmabhasajvala), the Wrathful Guru (Guru Drakpo) and Singhamukha, as the Guru, Yidam and Dakini, who are the roots of blessing, siddhi and activity. [Peter Roberts]

Three samadhis (ting nge 'dzin gsum). The samadhi of suchness, of illumination and of the seed-syllable. [RY]

Three samadhis (ting nge 'dzin gsum). The samadhi of suchness, of illumination and of the seed-syllable. The samadhi of suchness is to rest in the composure of the innate emptiness of all phenomena, as pointed out by one's root master, or simply to imagine that all things are empty like space. The samadhi of illumination is let natural compassion manifest like sunlight illuminating the sky, or simply to generate compassion for all the beings who fail to realize the nature of things. The samadhi of the seed-syllable is the innate unity of emptiness and compassion manifesting in the form of a syllable that is the 'seed' or source from which the deity and the entire mandala will appear during the practice. These three samadhis are the indispensible framework for the development stage of Vajrayana practice. In his Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo, Padmasambhava says, "The main part begins with the profound and vast samadhis Which purify the manner of death, bardo, and rebirth: The great emptiness space of suchness is pure like the sky. Rest evenly in this space of the undivided two truths. Emanate the magic of compassion, an all-illuminating cloud of awareness, filling the space, radiant yet without fixation. The single mudra in the manner of a subtle syllable Is the causal seed which produces everything. Keep this changeless wisdom essence, manifests in space, one-pointedly in mind and bring its vivid presence to perfection. [RY]

Three samadhis (ting nge 'dzin gsum). The samadhi of suchness, of illumination and of the seed-syllable. They form the framework for the development stage. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

three samadhis. The Thatness samadhi, the Manifestation samadhi and the Causal samadhi. They are represented by the syllables Om Ah and Hum. They are essentially emptiness and the Dharmakaya; compassion and the Sambhogakaya; the deity's symbolic form and the Nirmanakaya. They are also described, within this text, in the instructions on the outer practice, just before the description of Padmakara. [Peter Roberts]

three samadhis. These are described in detail in the longer commentary. In brief, they are the "thatness-samadhi" of great emptiness. The "Total-manifestation samdhi" of compassion and illusion, and the "Causual samadhi" of the mudra, the deity's body. They are represented respectively by the three syllables "Om ah hum"recited in the sadhana before the description of the empty nature of phenomena. Hrih is then recited before the description of the appearance of the deity. Some western editions of the sadhana have mistakenly taken the Hrih to be the last syllable of the preceding mantra of the emptiness of phenomena: dharmadhatu svabhava ah hum. [Peter Roberts]

Three seats of completeness (gdan gsum tshang ba'i dkyil 'khor). The three seats (gdan gsum) are the aggregates and elements as the seat of male and female tathagatas, the sense-bases as the seat of the male and female bodhisattvas, and the actions and faculties as the seat of the male and female wrathful ones. [RY]

three secrets (gsang ba gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three secrets (gsang ba gsum). Same as the three mysteries. [RY]

three secrets (gsang ba gsum). The vajra body, vajra speech and vajra mind of an enlightened being. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three secrets (gsang gsum) [LWx] [RY]

three secrets. The three secrets: The body, speech and mind of the Gurus, Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. They are called secret because they are inconceivable to ordinary beings. [Peter Roberts]

Three sections (sde gsum) The three divisions of Dzogchen: Mind Section, Space Section and Instruction Section. Also the name of an important terma of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Three Sections of Dzogchen (rdzogs chen sde gsum). After Garab Dorje established the six million four hundred thousand tantras of Dzogchen in the human world, his chief disciple, Manjushrimitra, arranged these tantras into three categories: the Mind Section emphasizing luminosity, the Space Section emphasizing emptiness, and the Instruction Section emphasizing their inseparability. [ZL] [RY]

Three Sections of Dzogchen. Garab Dorje entrusted these teachings to his main disciple, Manjushrimitra, who then classified them into the Three Sections of Dzogchen: Mind Section, Space Section, and Instruction Section. [RY]

three sets of precepts (sdom gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three sets of precepts (sdom gsum). See three vows. [RY]

three sets of vows (sdom pa gsum). The Hinayana vows of individual liberation, the Mahayana trainings of a bodhisattva, and the Vajrayana samayas of a vidyadhara, a tantric practitioner. [AL] [RY]

three solitudes of body, speech, and mind (lus ngag yid kyi dben gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three sorts of laziness; (le lo gsum): Indolence, which is to be prone to sleep and idleness. Faint-heartedness, which is to be discouraged before even beginning to strive, thinking, "Someone like me will never reach enlightenment, however much I may try." Laziness of neglecting true priorities, which is to be stuck in non-virtuous ways of acting and be only concerned only with affairs limited to this life. [MR]

three special qualities of the terma treasures; listing of [LW1] [RY]

three special qualities of transmission; of the Nyingma School, listing of [LW1] [RY]

Three special trainings {lhag pa'i bslab pa gsum}. The training of moral discipline, the training of contemplation and the training of discriminative awareness. [RY]

Three spheres ('khor gsum). The three 'spheres' or concepts of subject, object and action. [RY]

three spheres ('khor gsum); conceptualizing [LW1] [RY]

Three spheres {'khor gsum}. Subject, object and their interaction. [RY]

Three spheres of concepts ('khor gsum gyi dmigs pa). Subject, object and action. [RY]

Three Stages (rim gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three strengths of the lion (seng ge'i rtsal gsum). Miraculous transformations (rdzu 'phrul), swiftness (myur mgyogs), and the possession of wings made of wind (rlung gshog). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three strengths or faculties of the lion (seng ge'i rtsal gsum). These three have been suggested: miraculous transformations (rdzu 'phrul), swiftness (myur mgyogs), and the possession of wings made of wind (rlung gshog). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three successive Dharma Wheels of the causal teachings of the philosophical vehicles [LWx] [RY]

Three sufferings (sdug bsngal gsum). The suffering upon suffering, the suffering of change, and the all-pervasive suffering of formations. [RY]

three sufferings (sdug bsngal rnam pa gsum). The suffering upon suffering (as when losing one's parents and then falling very sick); the suffering of change (as when going to a happy picnic and being bitten by a snake); and the all-pervading, latent suffering inherent in all forms of conditioned existence. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three sufferings (sdug bsngal rnam pa gsum): the suffering upon suffering (e.g. losing one's parents and then falling very sick); the suffering of change (e.g. going to a pleasant picnic and being bitten by a snake); and the all-pervading, latent suffering inherent in all forms of conditioned existence. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three supreme image mandalas (lhag pa gzugs brnyan gyi dkyil 'khor gsum) are made of colored powder (rdul tshon), painted cloth (ras bris) and heaps (tshom bu). [RY]

three sweets (mngar gsum). Sugar, honey and molasses. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three things to carry (khyer so gsum). Regarding sights, sounds, and thoughts as being deity, mantra, and wisdom. [RY]

Three thousand fold universe. [RY]

Three Trainings (bslab pa gsum), in regard to the six paramitas; under the ten bhumis [LW1] [RY]

three trainings (bslab pa gsum). Ethical discipline (tshul khrims), contemplation (ting nge 'dzin), and wisdom (shes rab). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three trainings (bslab pa gsum). The trainings of discipline, concentration, and discriminating knowledge. [ZL] [RY]

Three trainings (bslab pa gsum): discipline, contemplation and wisdom. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three transmissions of the teachings (bka'i brgyud pa gsum). Buddhas' Mind Transmission, Vidyadharas' Sign Transmission and Great Masters' Oral Transmission. [RY]

three transmutations. The three transmutations are form into the deity or guru, sound into the mantra, and the automatic liberation of thought. [Peter Roberts]

Three Turnings - Aspects of the Buddha's teachings (Turnings of the Wheel of the Dharma), presented at different times and in different locations [RY]

Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]

Three types of "tantra of words" (tshig rgyud gsum): a] Tantra manifest as sound (sgrar snang ba'i rgyud) is is mind transmission or both the transmission of mind and symbol. b] Tantra uttered as sound (sgrar grags pa'i rgyud) is oral transmission of great masters. c] Tantra turned into symbols (brdar gyur pa'i rgyud) is the letter characters of the scriptures. For example, the terma teachings belong to the category of the three types of tantra of words; the mind transmission is to keep in mind what he initially have heard, the oral transmission he uttered it to the King and the subjects as the spontaneous sound of dharmata, and the Word Transmission of Yellow Parchment (shog ser tshig brgyud) is the teaching written down on the yellow parchment. [RY]

three types of emancipation. See emancipation [LW1] [RY]

Three types of ignorance (ma rig pa gsum). The ignorance of single identity, coemergent ignorance, and conceptual ignorance. [RY]

three types of individuals (skyes bu gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three types of knowledge (shes rab gsum). The understanding and insight resulting from learning, reflection and meditation practice. [RY]

Three types of liberation (thar pa gsum). The three types of emancipation of the shravaka, pratyekabuddha, and bodhisattva. [RY]

three types of pleasing actions (mnyes pa gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three types of pure nirvana. See also three levels of enlightenment [LW1] [RY]

T continued - T3


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 13:19, 12 August 2008 (EDT)