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T continued - T continued - T1 - T continued - T2 - T continued - T3 - T continued - T4 - T continued - T5 - T continued - T6


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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three vajras - Our essence, nature and capacity are the dharmakaya, sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. They are also the three vajras — the vajra body, speech and mind of all the buddhas — which we are supposed to achieve. This real and authentic state is, in itself, empty, which is dharmakaya. Its cognizant quality, isn't that sambhogakaya? Its unconfined unity, isn't that nirmanakaya? This indivisible identity of the three kayas is called the 'essence body,' svabhavikakaya. when we have cut through karma and obscurations and habitual patterns, then the nature of the three vajras is primordially and spontaneously present already within us. Unless we had these how could we produce the three vajras. Its because the three vajras are present within the ground as the vajra body, vajra speech and vajra mind and which is primordially present in all sentient beings as well. [Primer] [RY]

three vajras (rdo rje gsum) [LW1] [RY]

three vajras (rdo rje gsum). The three Vajras: The vajra (i.e. indestructible) body, speech and mind of Buddhahood. [Peter Roberts]

three valleys (ljong gsum), listing of [LW1] [RY]

Three vehicles (theg pa gsum). Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana. [RY]

three vows (sdom gsum). The pratimoksa vows of the Hinayana, which concern all the lay and monastic precepts of conduct taught by Lord Buddha in the Vinaya, the Bodhisattva vows of the Mahayana, which are embodied in the generation, cultivation and preservation of the twofold thought of enlightenment, or Bodhicitta, and the samayas, which are the precepts and commitments of the Vajrayana. Samayas formalize and acknowledge the all-important bonds with one's guru, one's fellow disciples and one's practice. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Vows (sdom pa gsum) are the Pratimoksha vows, the Bodhisattva precepts, and the Vajrayana samayas. See Appendix 1. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three vows (sdom pa gsum). The Hinayana vows of individual liberation, the Mahayana trainings of a bodhisattva, and the Vajrayana samayas of a vidyadhara. [RY]

Three vows;, (sdom gsum). The pratimoksa vows concern all the lay and monastic precepts of conduct taught by Lord Buddha in the Vinaya. The bodhisattva vows are in essence the wish to generate, cultivate and preserve the vow to dedicate all one's thoughts, words and actions solely to the benefit of others. Relatively, this means the exercise of loving kindness, compassion, and the six paramitas, ultimately leading all beings to complete enlightenment. The samaya vows are the sacramental links created when a disciple attends a spiritual master and receives from him an initiation. Although it is said that there are one hundred thousand samayas in the Mantrayana, they can be condensed into the samayas related to the body, speech and mind of the guru. [MR]

Three ways of pleasing the spiritual master {nyes pa gsum}, by making substantial offerings, offerings of service and offering of one's spiritual practice. [RY]

three wheels or activities of a buddha ('khor lo rnam gsum). The wheel of study and reflection (thos bsam); the wheel of meditation (sgom pa); and the wheel of activity (phrin las). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three wheels or activities of a Buddha ('khor lo rnams gsum): the wheel of study and reflection (thos bsam), the wheel of meditation (sgom pa), and the wheel of activity (phrin las). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three whites (dkar gsum). Milk, curd, and butter. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

three whites and the three sweets. The three whites are butter, curd and milk. The three sweets are honey, molasses and sugar. [Peter Roberts]

three whites are milk, curd, and butter; the three sweets are sugar, honey and molasses. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three worlds - Meaning above the earth, on the earth, and below the earth, respectively the realms of the gods, human beings, and nagas. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three worlds ('jig rten gsum). The three spheres of gods, humans, and nagas. [RY]

three worlds (khams gsum). The world of desire ('dod pa'i khams), the world of form (gzugs kyi khams), and the world of no-form (gzugs med kyi khams). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Three Yanas (theg pa gsum). The three levels of Buddhist teaching; Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana. [RY]

Three Yogas (rnal 'byor gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Three Yogas of Continual Practice (khyer so gsum gyi rnal 'byor). Perceiving appearances as deities and pure lands, sounds as mantra and thoughts as wisdom. [RY]

Three Yogas. See also Three Inner Tantras [LW1] [RY]

three Yogas: the utpatti (generation phase), the sampanna (completion phase) and the mahasandhi (the great completion). Also known as the Mahayoga, Anuyoga and Atiyoga, the names that will shortly be used for them. [Peter Roberts]

three Zurpa masters [LW1] [RY]

three-cornered, red "glorious-food" torma, encircled by a retinue of five tormas the same as itself and by dough triangles. dpal-bshos, more commonly known as a "Paltor" ("Glorious Torma"), this one being described as red with a lotus-petal base but with a projecting sharp-edged "waist" that forms points at three corners, unlike the rounded form of the guru-torma. The Karseh Kongtrül tradition follows Tsewang Norbu's use of eight surrounding lesser tormas instead of the five in this text [Peter Roberts]

Threefold Confidence (yid ches gsum ldan), a life story of Padmasambhava by Taranatha according to Indian sources. Tibetan title: slob dpon pad-ma'i rnam thar rgya gar lugs yid ches gsum ldan. Included by Jamgön Kongtrül in the Rinchen Terdzö, Vol. KA. [ZL] [RY]

Threefold Division of Ngari in Tö (stod mnga' ris skor gsum): According to CN, they are: 1) The Dharma Land of Mang Yul (mang yul chos kyi skor); 2) The Auspicious Bönpo Land of Guge (gu ge g.yung drung bon gi skor); and 3) The Snow Land of Purang (pu rang /spu hreng gangs kyi skor). Alternately, these three have been defined as 1) Guge Ya'i Kor (gu ge g.ya' yi skor), the Slate Land of Guge; 2) Purang Khang gi Kor (pu hrang gangs kyi skor), the Snow Land of Purang; 3) Ruthop Chap gi Kor (ru thob chab kyi skor) the Water Land of Ruthop. According to AC, Vol I, p.3, the three divisions are: 1) Purang, Mang Yul, and Zanskar (spu hreng, mang yul, zangs dkar), making the first division; 2) Li, Gilgit, and Balti (li, bru sha, sbal ti), making the second division; and 3) Shang Shung, Triteh and Lower Tö (zhang zhung, khri te /bri ste, stod smad), making the third division. Tö (stod) and Latö (la stod) are sometimes confused. Tö refers traditionally to the western part of Tibet at large, as opposed to U-Tsang (dbu gtsang) and Domey (mdo smad), and is the same as Ngari. Latö is the western part of Tsang and includes the districts of Nyanang (gnya' nang), Tingri (ding ri), Pungrong (spung rong), and Shelkar (shel dkar). People from Latö call themselves Töpas (stod pa), "people of Tö", which adds to the confusion, but they are not considered as such by inhabitants of Ngari. One also distinguishes North Latö (byang la stod) and South Latö (lho la stod, see TC, p. 2745), which were two of the thirteen divisions of Tibet (bod khri skor gcu sum). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

threefold equality (mnyam pa nyid gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Threefold equality, (mnyam pa nyid gsum), means being equal to all the buddhas 1) in having perfected the accumulations, 2) in being enlightened, and 3) in accomplishing the welfare of beings. [RY]

Threefold Excellence (dam pa gsum). The excellent beginning of bodhicitta, the excellent main part of nonconceptualization and the excellent conclusion of dedication. Also called the three excellencies. [RY]

THREEFOLD EXCELLENCE (dam pa gsum). The excellent beginning of bodhichitta, the excellent main part without conceptualization and the excellent conclusion of dedication. Also called the three excellencies. For a detailed explanation, see Repeating the Words of the Buddha (Rangjung Yeshe Publ.).[AL] [RY]

Threefold faith (dad pa gsum). Admiring, yearning and trusting faith. [RY]

Threefold Knowledge (rig gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Threefold miraculous actions (cho 'phrul rnam gsum). [RY]

Threefold Praise (skabs gsum pa) is a ritual text of praise in use in the Geluk tradition. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Threefold Purity ('khor gsum rnam dag). Absence of fixation on subject, object, and action. [RY]

threefold purity; expl. [LWx] [RY]

threefold ripening of disciples (gdul bya smin pa gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Threefold ripening of disciples (gdul bya smin pa gsum) is the ripening of nature, faculty, and thought (khams dbang po bsam pa) or strong ripening: The nature is ripened through having trained in the Dharma and the path during many former lives. By the power of that, the faculties are ripened since the five faculties of perfection (rnam byang) have become extremely sharp. By the power of that, discriminating knowledge (shes rab) has ripened from the present intelligence (shes rab) obtained at birth. [RY]

Threefold ripening of disciples (gdul bya smin pa gsum). The ripening of nature, faculty, and thought (khams dbang po bsam pa). [RY]

Threefold vows (sdom pa gsum). The Hinayana vows of individual liberation, the Mahayana trainings of a bodhisattva, and the Vajrayana samayas of a vidyadhara. [RY]

threefold wisdom (ye shes rnam gsum), of Ati Yoga; expl. [LW1] [RY]

Three-pronged vajra mudra {rdo rje rtse gsum kyi phyag rgya}. Mudra where the fingers are arranged in the form of a three-pronged vajra. This mudra is used while throwing out the stale breath at the beginning of the preliminary practice before each session. [RY]

Three-storied Three Crescents (zla gam gsum pa bang rim gsum pa). [ZL] [RY]

Three-thousandfold universe (stong gsum gyi 'jig rten gyi khams). The world system of Mount Sumeru and the four continents multiplied a thousand times a thousand times a thousand, adding up to one billion. [RY]

Thub pa'i dbang po'i bstod pa leags bshad snying po, more well knows as rten 'brel bstod pa;, Praise to the Interdependent Links, in 58 stanzas, composed by Tsongkhapa while doing a solitary retreat at Olkha, in Central Tibet, following a dream in which he meet, Nagarjuna, Shantideva, Chandrakirti, Aryadeva and other great Indian panditas, the chief expounders of the Madhyamaka philisophy. At the end of the dream Buddhapalita stood up and blessed Tsongkhapa with a volume of his commentary on Madhyamakalankara. Following this dream Tsongkhapa achieved a high degree of understanding of the ultimate reality while reading a verse of Bhudhapalita which says that, "the self is neither different nor identical to the aggregates." The same day, Tsongkhapa wrote this praise to Lord Buddha, the Awakened One who first realized this truth. [MR]

Thubten Chökyi Dorje, the 5th Dzogchen Rinpoche: 1872- [MR]

Thukje Chenpo Gyutrul Drawa. [RY]

Thunder of the Drum of Brahma (tshangs pa'i rnga sgra); sambhogakaya realm of [LW1] [RY]

Thunder of the Drum of Perfection. [Daki] [RY]

Tibet and Kham [LW1] [RY]

Tibet Guide, The, by Stephen Bachelor, published by Wisdom Publications, London, 1987, pp. 466 [MR]

Tibet is often called the "Land to the North," referring to the prediction of Buddha Sakyamuni that his teachings would spread to the north. When passing into Parinirvana, the Buddha laid his head toward the north. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tibet, a Political History, by Tsepon, W.D. Shakabpa, Potala Publications, New York, 1984, pp.369 Potala Publications, Rm. 703, 801 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10017 USA [MR]

Tibet; explanation of the spiritual quality of the place [LW1] [RY]

Tibetan army defeat the Chinese Emperor, and invades China upto Thranhen: 763 [MR]

Tibetan army defeat the Chinese Emperor, and invades China upto Thranhen: 763. [RY]

Tibetan Book of the Dead, The: The Great Liberation Through Hearing in the Bardo. Trns. by Franscesca Fremantle and Chögyam Trungpa, Shambhala Publications, Boston. [ZL] [RY]

Tibetan calendar is based on a sixty year cycle, based on twelve different animal signs combined with five elements. In addition, each year of this cycle also has a specific name of its own. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tibetan coins and measures. These measures correspond to quantities of silver and gold since banknotes were issued only at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Shabkar's times one sho (zho) was the equivalent of 3.7 g. of silver and nine sho were roughly equivalent to one sang (srang). Various Nepalese coins (called tamka, Tib. tangka, from a Muslim name) equivalent to one-and-half sho circulated in Tibet at the same value, although some were made of pure silver and some of 50 percent alloy. The issue of debased coins caused repeated conflicts with Nepal (see chap. 13, note 46). Chinese coins of fine silver equivalent to one sho were also common. The karma (skar ma) is the smallest monetary unit and is roughly equivalent to one-tenth of a sho. A che-gye (phyed brgyad) is half of a cut tanka. A dotse (rdo tshad = stone-size) is the weight, or collection of fifty sangs. A Chinese tamik (rta rmig = horse hoof) is a silver ingot cast in the shape of a horse's hoof. There are two sizes: a large one weighing 165 tolas of silver (that is, about 2 kg.) and a small one weighing about 500 gms. On the development of currency in Tibet, see Rhodes (1990). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tibetan History (bod kyi srid don rgyal rabs), by Tsepon, W.D. Shakabpa, published by Shakabpa House, Kalimpong, Indian, 1976, Vol. I and II. [MR]

Tibetan Schools of Buddhism - these come under the two general headings of rNying ma (the ancient ones) and gSar ma (the new ones). [RY]

TIDRO CAVE AT SHOTÖ (sho stod sti sgro). Sacred place of Padmasambhava and Yeshe Tsogyal near Drigung Til in Central Tibet. Opened by Padmasambhava for future practitioners, this important pilgrimage site also has hot springs with healing properties. [AL] [RY]

Tidro Gang (ti sgro gangs) [LW1] [RY]

Tidro. [Daki] [RY]

Tiger's Nest. [Daki] [RY]

Tika (thig le). Essence; sphere. [ZL] [RY]

Tika. A commentary (esp. on another commentary). [RY]

Tilaka (thig le). Essence; sphere. [ZL] [RY]

Tilopa (10th-11th century) Naropa (active in the middle of the 11th century), Marpa (mar pa chos kyi blo gros, 1012-97) and Rechung Dorje Drakpa (ras chung rdo rje grags pa, 1084-1161) are the first patriarchs of the Kagyu Lineage. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tilopa (Skt.). Indian mahasiddha, the guru of Naropa, and father of the Kagyu lineage. [RY]

Tilopa (til li pa). Indian mahasiddha, the guru of Naropa and father of the Kagyü lineage. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Tilopa. (988-1069). Indian mahasiddha, the guru of Naropa and father of the Kagyü lineage.[Primer] [RY]

Tilopa: 988-1069 [MR]

Tilopa: 988-1069. [RY]

Times of decline. =Degenerate age. [RY]

Times, the three (dus gsum). Past, present, future. [RY]

Ting Od Barma (mthing 'od 'bar ma). The consort of Raksha Tötreng. [RY]

Tingri Langkhor (ding ri glang 'khor), which lies west of Tingri Dzong, was established in 1097 by the Indian yogin Padampa Sangye (d. 1117). See Aziz (1980). The relics and belongings of the saint were preserved there. Most of these were saved from the devastation brought on by the Cultural Revolution and are presently preserved by Dza Trulshik Rinpoche in Nepal. The Langkhor monastery, now in process of restoration, was built above the cave where Padampa meditated. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tingri Langkhor; (ding ri glang 'khor) Tingri Langkhor, which lies West of Tingri Dzong, was established in 1097 by the Indian yogin Padampa Sangye (-1117). The Langkor monastery, now in process of restoration, was built above the cave where Padampa meditated. [MR]

Tingshag (ting shags), tiny, thick cymbals with a high-pitched sound. They are often made of bell-metal and are mostly used in Kriya Tantra rites, water torma offering (chu gtor), and burnt offerings (gsur) made to the starving spirits. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tingting Tinglomen (ting ting ting lo sman). [ZL] [RY]

Tiny pearl-like relics (ring bsrel). See chap.6, note 11. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tipitaka - Pali term for the Tripitaka: Vinaya, Sutra, Abhidharma, with Tantra sometimes regarded as a fourth pitaka [RY]

Tirahuti. [Daki] [RY]

Tirthapuri; A sacred place with a cave blessed by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal, where one can see granite rock with their embedded foot-prints. One also finds hot springs and a geyser. [MR]

Tirthika (mu stegs pa) [LW1] [RY]

Tirthika (mu stegs pa). Non-Buddhist teachers of philosophy adhering to the extreme views of eternalism or nihilism. [RY]

Tirthika (mu stegs). An adherent of a non-buddhist religion, esp. a Hindu, Jain or Lokyata (materialist) [RY]

Tirthikas (mu stegs pa). Non-Buddhist teachers of philosophy adhering to the extreme views of eternalism or nihilism.[Primer] [RY]

Ti-se - Sacred mountain in western Tibet; also known as Kailasa. [Tarthang]

Tisey / (ti se) - Sacred mountain in western Tibet; also known as Kailash [RY]

Tishi Repa (ti shi ras pa). One of the masters in the Barom Kagyu lineage. [RY]

Tobden. [Daki] [RY]

Tob-yig (thob yig) [LW1] [RY]

Tögal (thod rgal) [LW1] [RY]

Tögal (thod rgal). 'Direct crossing.' Dzogchen has two main sections: Trekchö and Tögal. The former emphasizes primordial purity (ka dag) and the latter spontaneous presence (lhun grub).[Primer] [RY]

Tögal (thod rgal). 'Direct crossing' or 'passing above.' Dzogchen, mahasandhi, has two main sections: trekcho and Tögal. The former emphasizes primordial purity (ka dag) and the latter spontaneous presence (lhun grub). [RY]

Tögal (thod rgal). 'Direct crossing.' Dzogchen has two main sections: Trekchö and Tögal. The former emphasizes primordial purity (ka dag) and the latter spontaneous presence (lhun grub). [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Tögal vision (thod rgal gyi snang ba). The four 'visions' or stages of experience on the path of Tögal are 'manifest dharmata,' 'increased experience,' 'awareness reaching fullness,' and 'exhaustion of dharmas beyond concepts.' [RY]

Tokharia? - Central Asia Dharma language associated with the areas of Kucha and Turfan; usually divided into two branches [RY]

tol bu, pronounced "tolhu;" is the calf born from a dzomo (the hybrid offspring of a bull and dri, the female of the yak). The tolhu is a feeble animal, useless for domestic purposes, and is often killed or left to starve to death. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tolung Tsurphu. [RY]

Tölung Valley (stod lung). [ZL] [RY]

Tölung Valley [LW1] [RY]

Tong-len (gtong len). See 'giving and taking.' [RY]

Torch of the Three Ways (tshul gsum sgron me) [LW1] [RY]

Torch That Illuminates the Graded Path (lam rim gsal ba'i sgron me); see Appendix 5. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tori Nyenshel [LW1] [RY]

Torma (gtor ma) is a symbolic ritual object often made of flour, wood, or precious metal, which, depending on circumstances, can be visualized as an offering, as the deity, as a blessing, or as a weapon hurled against negative forces. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Torma (gtor ma). An implement used in tantric ceremonies. Can also refer to a food offering to protectors of the Dharma or unfortunate spirits. [ZL] [RY]

TORMA (gtor ma). An implement used in tantric ceremonies. Can also refer to a food offering to protectors of the Dharma or unfortunate spirits. [AL] [RY]

Torma (gtor ma). An implement used in tantric ceremonies. Can also refer to a food offering to protectors of the Dharma or unfortunate spirits.[Primer] [RY]

Torma {gtor ma}. Ritual objects in different shapes made of flour or clay which symbolize deities or offerings. [RY]

Torma. "continuous tormas", the "temporary tormas" and the "fixed-duration tormas". The three kinds of torma: The "continuous torma" is one that remains upon the shrine throughout the practice, either as offerings or as representations of the deity. [Peter Roberts]

tormas for the obstacle-makers. In this practice the torma offered in the preliminary practice for pacifying obstacle makers is called sha-gzugs-ma "the flesh-shape torma", which represents a bent leg, the thigh upon the ground and the foot in the air against the sole of which a butter disc is pressed. This is said to represent the leg that Padmakara manifested, while in meditation, and hurled to obstacle-makers to pacify them. [Peter Roberts]

Tossing the flower - This refers to the section of the empowerment ceremony in which one throws a flower onto the mandala to determine the meditation deity with which one has the closest karmic links or affinity. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Total purity of the three concepts ('khor gsum rnam dag). Absence of fixation on subject, object and action. [RY]

totalities, ten (zad par bcu). See ten totalities [LW1] [RY]

Tötreng Tsal (thod phreng rtsal). The secret name of Guru Rinpoche and also the long Guru Rinpoche mantra in the context of Trinley Nyingpo. [RY]

To-yor Nagpo (tho yor nag po). [ZL] [RY]

Tra Düntse (pra dun rtse). [ZL] [RY]

Traditions of the Two Chariots (shing rta gnyis). See Two Chariots [LW1] [RY]

Training, threefold, tri-shiksa, (bslab pa gsum). The trainings relating to Morality, to Concentration, and to Wisdom. [RY]

Trainings (bslab pa). See Three Trainings [LW1] [RY]

Trak Yerpa 1.;, (brag yer pa) Drak Yerpa (brag yer pa) is the holy place of Guru Padmasambhava related to the speech aspect. In this place of great scenic beauty there are over 80 caves where many great beings from all lineages meditated. On the top are the caves of Guru Padmasambhava (brag gi yang bgrod dka') and of Yeshe Tsogyal (gsang phug). Below is Drubthop Phug (grub thob phug) the great cave where the 80 siddhas of Yerpa (Guru Padmasambhava's disciples) meditated together. There is also Lord Atisha's cave (rten 'brel phug, or Atisa'i gzim phug). There is also Dawa Phug (zla ba phug), a cave blessed by Guru Padmasambhava who left an imprint of his foot in the rock). Padampa Sangye, too, meditated in this cave. Nyima Phug (nyi ma phug) is another cave, uphill, blessed by Guru Rinpoche. Dorje Phug (rdo rje phug) is the cave where Lhalung Palkyi Dorje is said to have hid himself after assassinating King Langdarma in 842. Chögyal Phug (chos rgyal phug) is the cave where King Songtsen Gampo meditated. [RY]

Trak Yerpa 2. Chanag Dorje Phug (Phyag na rdo rje'i phug) comprise a serie of four south-facing caves. At the invitation of Ngok Changchup Dorje, Jowo Atisha, accompanied by Drom Tönpa, came in 1047 and taught extensively at Yerpa, and established there the second Kadampa Monastery, Yerpa Drubde (yer pa sgrub sde). At the very top of the cliff are Utse Phug (dbu rtse phug) and Pukar Rabsel (phug dkar rab gsal). [MR]

Trakar Taso (brag dkar rta so) between Kyirong and Dzongka (see MI) is one of the most important meditation places of Milarepa. There he spent nine, or according to others twelve, years in continuous meditation, beginning in 1083. At that location is Milarepa's cave known as the Central Citadel (dbu ma rdzong). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Trakar Taso Tulku Chökyi Wangchuk (brag dkar rta so sprul sku chos kyi dbang phyug, 1775-1837) was an influential master in the areas along the Nepal-Tibet border. He was a disciple of Trinley Dudjom Gön Nang Chöje (phrin las bdud 'joms mgon gnang chos rje, 1726-89), himself a disciple of Kathog Rigdzin Tsewang Norbu (kah thog rig 'dzin tshe dbang nor bu, 1698-1755). His reply to Shabkar's letter, as well as a reply to a second letter from Shabkar is found in Vol. Tha of Trakar Taso Tulku's Collected Writings, pp. 749-54. (Communicated by Franz-Karl Ehrhard). Shabkar's second letter, as well the letters mentioned above, is found in DOL 3, folio 88b and in TS 4, p.694. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Trakpa Choyang, Gyaltsap V: 1617-1658 [MR]

Traktung Pawo (khrag 'thung dpa' bo). The name of Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje. [RY]

Tralep Kyamgon. [RY]

Trambu Forest (gram bu'i tshal). [ZL] [RY]

Tramdruk. [Daki] [RY]

Tramen (phra men). Goddesses with human bodies and animal heads. 'Tramen' means 'hybrid' or 'alloy.' [ZL] [RY]

tramen (phra men); eight goddesses [LW1] [RY]

Tranh-nhan Ton - Vietnamese king who founded a school that sought to integrate Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian ideals [RY]

Tranpo Tertön Sherab Özer *(?? po gter ston shes rab 'od zer). The heart disciple of ?? [RY]

Transcendent Knowledge (shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa), prajnaparamita. Intelligence that transcends conceptual thinking. 'Transcendent' literally means 'gone to the other shore' in the sense of having departed from 'this shore' of dualistic concepts. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Transcendent Knowledge (shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa, prajnaparamita). Intelligence that transcends conceptual thinking. [RY]

Transcendent Knowledge. See Prajnaparamita, knowledge [LW1] [RY]

Transcendental actions (pha rol tu phyin pa'i spyod pa). See 'paramita.' [RY]

transference (pho ba); about ignorance; habitual tendency of; level of subtlety; obscuration of; tendencies for the three experiences of; three experiences of [LW1] [RY]

Transference. [RY]

transference; about ignorance; habitual tendency of; level of subtlety; obscuration of; obscuration of ('pho sgrib); obscuration of ('pho sgrib), expl.; tendencies for the three experiences of (snang gsum 'pho ba'i bags chags); tendencies of the three experiences of (snang gsum 'pho ba'i bag chags), expl.; three experiences of [LWx] [RY]

Transformation (sprul bsgyur): a meditation practice in which a practitioner visualizes himself or herself going through all possible transformations. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Transitory collection ('jig tshogs). Refers to the continuity of the five aggregates. [RY]

Translated Treatises. See Tengyur [LW1] [RY]

Translated Words. See Kangyur [LW1] [RY]

Translation Temple (sgra sgyur gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Translator ('jig rten mig gcig). The Tibetan translation of the Sanskrit word Locava [lotsawa]. [RY]

Translator from Langdro (lang gro lo tsa ba). One of the 25 disciples of Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

T continued - T4


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 13:19, 12 August 2008 (EDT)