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Transmission (dbang lung),/ (ngo sprod). 1) A name covering both empowerment and reading transmission. 2) Same as the 'pointing-out instruction.' [RY]

Transmission Lineages - After the Great Dharma King Ral pa can was killed by anti-Buddhist factions of the government, his brother, Glang dar ma, took the throne. During his reign, traditional studies were halted, monks forced to return to lay life, and monasteries closed. Esoteric practitioners continued secretly, and all lineages were preserved. The Vinaya transmission was maintained in the East through gYo, Rab, and dMar, Bla chen, and Klu mes, who returned to Central Tibet; the Abhidharma transmission was maintained in the East through lHa lung dPal gyi rdo rje and his disciples; the Prajnaparamita transmission was maintained through sKu ba dPal brtsegs, Cog ro Klu'i rgyal mtshan, and Ye shes sde; the Tantra transmission was maintained through gNyags Jnanakumara, gNubs chen Sangs rgyas ye shes, and the Three Zur. [RY]

Transmission of the Earthen Pot {rdza ma'i lung}. Name of a transmission from the Dharma of transmission. [RY]

Transmission of the four rivers of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags chu bo bzhi'i bka' babs) Tantra, vajra master, life and awareness. [RY]

Transmission of the Leather Bag {sgro ba'i lung}. Name of a transmission from the Dharma of transmission. [RY]

transmission, four special (bka' babs bzhi) The transmissions that Tilopa received from his four main teachers. These four transmissions were passed from Tilopa to Naropa and then to Marpa. They are the yogas of the illusory body, dream, luminosity, and candali. [Rain of Wisdom] Travels of Fa-Hsien: 399-414 [MR]

Treasure letters (gter yig) possessing physical form are nirmanakayas. They are also speech for u [RY]

treasure letters (gter yig). See also dakini script [LW1] [RY]

Treasure lineages (gter brgyud). The transmission of teachings, hidden as treasures, to be revealed in the future to destined students by a tertön, treasure-revealer. [RY]

Treasure lords (gter bdag). The guardians of the terma teachings. [RY]

treasure master; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

Treasure of Abhidharma; Abhidharmakosha; (mngon pa mdzod) - Vasubandhu, 4th or 5th century. [PK] [RY]

Treasure revealer (gter ston). The master who reveals a terma teaching. [RY]

treasure. See terma [LW1] [RY]

treasure. Terma. The transmission through concealed treasures hidden, mainly by Guru Rinpoche and Yeshe Tsogyal, to be discovered at the proper time by a 'tertön,' a treasure revealer, for the benefit of future disciples. It is one of the two chief traditions of the Nyingma School, the other being 'Kama.' This tradition is said to continue even long after the Vinaya of the Buddha has disappeared.[Primer] [RY]

treasures; listing of different types [LWx] [RY]

Treasury Commentary (mdzod tik) [LW1] [RY]

Treasury of Abhidharma (chos mngon pa mdzod) [LW1] [RY]

Treasury of Mahayana Sutras [LW1] [RY]

TREASURY OF PRECIOUS TERMAS (rin chen gter mdzod). See under 'Rinchen Terdzö.'[AL] [RY]

Treasury of the Nonarising Jewel (skye med rin po che'i mdzod) [LW1] [RY]

Treatises (bstan bcos), shastra. Scriptures composed by accomplished or learned masters. [RY]

treatises (shastra) [LW1] [RY]

Tregu Cave of Chimphu (mchims phu bre gu dge'u). A cave at Samye Chimphu. [ZL] [RY]

Trekchö (khregs chod) [LW1] [RY]

Trekcho (khregs chod) See 'Cutting Through.' One of the two main aspects of Dzogchen practice, the other being Tögal. [RY]

Trekchö (khregs chod). 'Cutting through' the stream of delusion, the thoughts of the three times, by revealing naked awareness devoid of dualistic fixation. To recognize this view through the oral instructions of one's master and to sustain it uninterruptedly throughout all aspects of life is the very essence of Dzogchen practice.[Primer] [RY]

Trekchö (khregs chod). 'Cutting through' the stream of delusion, the thoughts of the three times, by revealing naked awareness devoid of dualistic fixation. To recognize this view through the oral instructions of one's master and to sustain it uninterruptedly throughout all aspects of life is the very essence of Dzogchen practice. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Trekchö; and Thögal;, (khregs chod; and thod rgal). The practices of cutting through the solidity of clinging and of direct vision, these two relating respectively to primordial purity (ka dag) and spontaneous accomplishment (lhun grup). [MR]

Tri Changchup Chöpel Rinpoche (khri byang chub chos 'phel, 1756-1838), the first Trijang Rinpoche, and the sixty-ninth holder of the throne of Ganden. He became tutor of the ninth Dalai Lama. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tri Gya, the Hundred Instructions; (khrid brgya), one hundred meditative instructions from all traditions collected and arranged by Jonang Jetsün Kunga Drolchog, 1507-1566. (Can be found in the gdams ngag mdzod, vol.18) [MR]

Tri Ralpachen (khri ral pa can). See Ralpachen. [ZL] [RY]

triangular "red-torma" as a basis for the visualisation of Singhamukha, encircled by four tormas the same as itself and by dough triangles. This red torma, which is traingular and comes to a point at the tip, like an elongated pyramid, and is known as a "sharp-pointed red torma" (dmar-gtor rtse-rno), and is also known as a "Tun-tor" (thun-gtor "magic-weapon torma") as opposed to the "blunt-ended" red tormas. [Peter Roberts]

Trichiliocosm {stong gsum gyi stong chen po 'jig rten gyi 'khams}. Three-thousandfold universe. [RY]

Trident. [Daki] [RY]

Tridey Tsugten (khri lde gtsug rten). [ZL] [RY]

trikaya (sku gsum; three bodies) The three bodies of buddhahood. The dharmakaya (chos kyi sku; [RY]

Trikaya Guru (sku gsum bla ma). Literally, the master of the three bodies; the master who is the embodiment of dharmakaya, sambhogakaya, and nirmanakaya. In the context Lamey Tukdrub Barchey Kunsel, it can also refer to the gurus of the three kayas, i.e. Amitabha as the dharmakaya, Avalokiteshvara as the sambhogakaya, and Padmakara as the nirmanakaya. [RY]

Trilogy of Commentaries by Bodhisattvas (sems 'grel skor gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Trinley Drodul Tsal (phrin las 'gro 'dul rtsal). Another name of Chokgyur Lingpa [RY]

Trinley Nyingpo (phrin las snying po). The Essence Practice. The short version of the guru sadhana of Barchey Kunsel. [RY]

Tripitaka - The three collections of the Buddha's tea [RY]

Tripitaka - The three collections of the Buddha's teachings: Vinaya, Sutra, Abhidharma, with Tantra sometimes regarded as a fourth pitaka. [Tarthang]

Tripitaka (sde snod gsum). The three collections of teachings; vinaya, sutra, and abhidharma. [RY]

Tripitaka (sde snod gsum). The three collections of the teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni: Vinaya, Sutra, and Abhidharma. Their purpose is the development of the three trainings of discipline, concentration and discriminating knowledge while their function is to remedy the three poisons of desire, anger and delusion. The Tibetan version of the Tripitaka fills more than one hundred large volumes, each with more than 600 pages. [ZL] [RY]

Tripitaka (sde snod gsum). The three collections of the teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni: Vinaya, Sutra, and Abhidharma. Their purpose is the development of the three trainings of discipline, concentration and discriminating knowledge while their function is to remedy the three poisons of desire, anger and delusion. The Tibetan version of the Tripitaka fills more than one hundred large volumes, each with more than 600 large pages. In a wider sense all of the Dharma, both Sutra and Tantra, is contained within the three collections and three trainings. To paraphrase Khenpo Ngakchung in his Notes to the Preliminary Practices for Longchen Nyingtig: "The three collections of Hinayana scriptures, namely Vinaya, Sutra, and Abhidharma, respectively express the meaning of the training in discipline, concentration and discriminating knowledge. The teachings describing the details of precepts for the bodhisattva path belong to the Vinaya collection while the meaning expressed by these scriptures are the training in discipline. The sutras expressing the gateways to samadhi are the Sutra collection while their expressed meaning, reflections on precious human body and so forth, are the training in concentration. The scriptures on the sixteen or twenty types of emptiness are the Abhidharma collection while their expressed meaning is the training in discriminating knowledge. Scriptures expounding the details of the samayas of Vajrayana are the Vinaya collection while their expressed meaning is the training in discipline. The scriptures teaching the general points of development and completion belong to the Sutra collection, while their expressed meaning is the training in samadhi. All the scriptures expressing the Great Perfection belong to the Abhidharma collection, while their expressed meaning is the training in discriminating knowledge."[AL] [RY]

Tripitaka (Three Collections) (sde snod gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Tripitaka {sde snod gsum}. The three collections of the Buddhist teachings, Vinaya {'dul ba}, Sutra {mdo}, and Abhidharma {mngon pa}. [RY]

Tripitaka. [Daki] [RY]

Tripitaka: the three baskets of Vinaya, Sutra and Abhidharma. The are all included in the Tibetan canonical collection called Kangyur (bka' 'gyur). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tripitaka; expl.; see also 'Three Collections'; [LWx] [RY]

Triple Gem - the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha. [RY]

Triple Gem (tri ratna, dkon mchog gsum). The Buddha, Dharma and Sangha Refuges. [RY]

Triple Refuge (skyabs gnas gsum). Same as the Three Jewels. [RY]

triple sangha [LWx] [RY]

Triple-storied Central Temple (dbu rtse rigs gsum) / (rim gsum). The central structure at the temple complex of Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Triple-vow vajra-holder (sdom gsum rdo rje 'dzin pa). A master who can keep the vows of each of the three vehicles simultaneously and without conflict. [RY]

triplistic conceptualisation. The conceptualisation of subject, action and object. Dualistic conceptualisation being that of subject and object, or self and other. [Peter Roberts]

Trisang Lhalö (khri bzang lha lod). A minister of King Trisong Deutsen. [ZL] [RY]

Trisang Yablhag (khri bzang yab lhag). A minister of King Trisong Deutsen. [ZL] [RY]

Trishö Gyalmo (khri shod rgyal mo) [LW1] [RY]

Trishok Gyalmo - The Mother is the Blue Lake, Trishok Gyalmo, and her mantle is the ice that covers the lake during the winter and allows one to cross from the mainland to the islands. The holy place and the palace mentioned below refer to Tsonying Island. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Trisong Detsen: 790-844 /or 718 (Buton) or 730 (in Bee kar) [MR]

Trisong Deutsen (khri srong de'u btsan). (790-844) The king of Tibet who invited Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Trisong Deutsen (khri srong de'u btsan). (790-844) The second great Dharma king of Tibet who invited Guru Rinpoche, Shantarakshita, Vimalamitra, and many other Buddhist teachers including Jinamitra and Danashila. He built Samye, the great monastery and teaching center modeled after Odantapuri, established Buddhism as the state religion of Tibet, and during his reign the first monks were ordained. Panditas and lotsawas translated many texts, and large numbers of practice centers were established. [RY]

Trisong Deutsen (khri srong de'u btsan). (790-844) The second great Dharma king of Tibet who invited Guru Rinpoche, Shantarakshita, Vimalamitra, and many other Buddhist teachers including Jinamitra and Danashila. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli, Jamgön Kongtrül date Trisong Deutsen as being born on the eighth day of the third month of spring in the year of the Male Water Horse (802). Other sources state that year as his enthronement upon the death of his father. Until the age of seventeen he was chiefly engaged in ruling the kingdom. He built Samye, the great monastery and teaching center modeled after Odantapuri, established Buddhism as the state religion of Tibet, and during his reign the first monks were ordained. He arranged for panditas and lotsawas to translate innumerable sacred texts, and he established a large number of centers for teaching and practice. [ZL] [RY]

Trisong Deutsen (khri srong de'u btsan). (790-844) The second great Dharma king of Tibet who invited Guru Rinpoche, Shantarakshita, Vimalamitra, and many other Buddhist teachers including Jinamitra and Danashila. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli, Jamgön Kongtrül dates Trisong Deutsen as being born on the eighth day of the third month of spring in the year of the Male Water Horse (802). Other sources state that year as his enthronement upon the death of his father. Until the age of seventeen he was chiefly engaged in ruling the kingdom. He built Samye, the great monastery and teaching center modeled after Odantapuri, established Buddhism as the state religion of Tibet, and during his reign the first monks were ordained. He arranged for panditas and lotsawas to translate innumerable sacred texts, and he established a large number of centers for teaching and practice. Among his later incarnations are Nyang Ral Nyima Özer (1124-1192), Guru Chöwang (1212-1270), Jigmey Lingpa (1729-1798), and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo (1820-1892).[AL] [RY]

Trisong Deutsen (khri srong lde'u btsan); details of [LWx] [RY]

Trisong Deutsen / Khri srong lde btsan - Tibetan Dharma king regarded as an incarnation of Manjushri; invited Padmasambhava and Shantarakshita to Tibet [RY]

Trisong Deutsen / Khri srong lde'u btsan (8th century) second great Dharma King, who invited to Tibet Padmasambhava, Shantarakshita, Vimalamitra, and many other Buddhist teachers including Jinamitra and Danashila. With the aid of Shantarakshita and Padmasambhava, he built bsam yas, the great monastery and teaching center modeled after Odantapuri. he proclaimed Buddhism the religion of Tibet, and during his reign the first monks were ordained. Panditas and lotsawas translated many texts, and large numbers of practice centers were established. He was succeeded by: Mu ne and Khri lde srong btsan (Sad na legs) [RY]

Trisong Deutsen. See King Trisong Deutsen [LW1] [RY]

Trisong Deutsen: 790- 844 /or 718 (Buton) or 730 (in Bee kar). [RY]

Trisong Deutsen; (790-844), (Khri srong ldeu btsan), The great dharma king who invited from India the abbot Santarakshita (tib. Shiwatso) - also known as Khanchen Bodhisatto - and Guru Padmasambhava, to build the monastery of Samye, and establish Buddhism in Tibet. He then invited one hundred and eight great Indian panditas, led by Vimalamitra, to translate all the Buddhist scriptures into Tibetan, together with the same number of Tibetan panditas led by Vairotsana. With the other of the twenty five main disciples of Guru Rinpoche he received the first empowerment given by Guru Rinpoche in Tibet, at Samye Chimphu. Later, he took successive rebirths as many great saints and tertöns, among them Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa himself, and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. [MR]

Trisong Deutsen; initiation name [LWx] [RY]

Trodrel (spros bral). The second stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]

TRÖMA NAGMO (khros ma nag mo). A wrathful black form of the female buddha Vajra Yogini. Tröma Nagmo means 'Black Lady of Wrath.'[AL] [RY]

True all-ground of application (sbyor ba don gyi kun gzhi). [RY]

True Dharma, sad-dharma, (dam chos). The Law of the Buddhas. [RY]

True Goal, bhuta-koti, (yang dag pa'i mtha'). Ultimate Truth, Emptiness. [RY]

True Image Mind-Only School (sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]

True Image Mind-Only School of Equal Number Perceiver and Perceived (bzung 'dzin grangs mnyam sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]

True Joy (mngon par dga' ba). The pure realm of Buddha Akshobhya. [RY]

True luminosity (don gyi 'od gsal). Same as empty luminosity. [RY]

True meaning (nges don). The definitive meaning as opposed to the expedient or relative meaning. The teachings of Prajnaparamita and the Middle Way. [RY]

True meaning (nges don). The definitive meaning as opposed to the expedient or relative meaning. The teachings of Prajnaparamita and the Middle Way. In his Treasury of Knowledge, Jamgön Kongtrül the Great defines the true /definitive meaning in the following way: The topics taught to exceptional disciples that the nature of all phenomena is profound emptiness devoid of constructs such as arising and ceasing, and, that the innate real condition of things is by nature luminos wakefulness and lies beyond words, thoughts and description. Moreover, it is the words of the Buddha expounding this meaning as well as the commentaries upon them. [RY] True Nature (dharmata, chos nyid; also gnas lugs). ditto. [RY]

True wisdom (don gyi ye shes). The wisdom which is the unity of awareness and emptiness introduced through the fourth empowerment. [RY]

Trülnang ('phrul snang). One of two important temples in Lhasa built by King Songtsen Gampo and housing a statue of Buddha Shakyamuni. [ZL] [RY]

Trulshig Senge Gyabpa:1243-1303 [MR]

Trülshik Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Truly high (mngon mtho) The three higher realms of humans, demigods and gods. [RY]

Truly High (mngon mtho). Refers to a rebirth in the three higher realms within samsara: humans, demigods and gods. [RY]

truth (bden pa); of cessation; four aspects of; of origin; four aspects of; of suffering; four aspects of; of the path; four aspects of [LW1] [RY]

truth of cessation [LW1] [RY]

truth of cessation; four aspects of [LWx] [RY]

truth of origin; four aspects of [LWx] [RY]

truth of suffering; four aspects of [LWx] [RY]

truth of the path; four aspects of [LWx] [RY]

Truths, the two (satya, bden). Ultimate and conventional. [RY]

Tsagong of Tsari (tsa ri tsa gong). [ZL] [RY]

Tsa-lung (rtsa rlung). Nadi and prana, the channels and energies. [RY]

Tsamchok. [RY]

Tsami Lotsawa Sangye Trak (tsa mi lo tsa ba sangs rgyas grags). Born in the eastern Tibetan province of Minyak, he travelled to India and studied with the famous pandita Abhayakara. He was acclaimed throughout India as the most learned of panditas and a fully realized mahasiddha, and was the only Tibetan ever to hold the thrones of Vajrasana and Nalanda. (See BD, IV, p.280). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsampa (rtsam pa) is a flour made of roasted barley. It is the staple food among Tibetans. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsandra Rinchen Drak (tsa 'dra rin chen brag) [LW1] [RY]

Tsandraghirti (Chandrakirti) [LW1] [RY]

Tsang (gtsang). See also Ü and Tsang; clan; province [LW1] [RY]

Tsang Khenchen (gtang mkhan chen 'jam dbyangs dpal ldan rgya mtsho): 1610-1684 [MR]

Tsang Nyön Heruka (gtsang smyon he ru ka rus pa'i rgyan can): 1452-1507 [MR]

Tsangma Shangton (founder of Sagpa line of Shangpa Kagyu): 1234-1309 [MR]

Tsangpa Gyare (gtsang pa rgya ras ye shes rdo rje): 1161-1211 [MR]

Tsangpa Gyarey (gtsang pa rgya ras) (1161-1211). Early master in the Drukpa Kagyü lineage, also known as Yeshe Dorje (ye shes rdo rje). Chief disciple of Lingje Repa and founder of Druk Gönpa after which Drukpa Kagyü got its name. It was during his time that a saying appeared, "Half the people are Drukpas, half the Drukpas are mendicant beggars, and half the mendicants are siddhas."[EMP] [RY]

Tsangpa Lhai Metok, 'divine flower of Brahma.' (tshangs pa lha'i me tog). Name of King Trisong Deutsen [Daki] [RY]

Tsangpa Lhayi Metok. See King Trisong Deutsen [LW1] [RY]

Tsangpo (gtsang po), Skt. Brahmaputra. The river flowing by Samye. [ZL] [RY]

Tsangsar Chimey Dorje (tshang gsar 'chi med rdo rje). The father of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche and brother of Samten Gyatso. For details, see The Life and Teachings of Chokgyur Lingpa, Rangjung Yeshe Publications. [RY]

Tsangsar family. [RY]

Tsangsar Lhai Dung-gyu (tshang gsar lha'i gdung rgyud). The 'divine blood-line of the Tsangsar family which is said to originate from a deva descending on earth. [RY]

Tsangsar Lumey Dorje (tshang gsar lus med rdo rje). One of the masters in the Barom Kagyu lineage. [RY]

Tsangsar Nargon. [RY]

Tsangsar Ngaktrin Lama (gtsang gsar ngag phrin bla ma). Son of the daughter of Chokgyur Lingpa and root guru of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, also known as Samten Gyamtso. [RY]

Tsangsar Ngaktrin. [RY]

Tsangsar Sönam Yeshe. [RY]

Tsangtsen Dorje Lekpa (gtsang btsan rdo rje legs pa). [ZL] [RY]

Tsa-nyag Lama Sherab [LW1] [RY]

Tsarchen Losal Gyatso: 1502- 1565 [MR]

Tsari - The two thousand and eight hundred deities who dwell on the central mountain of Tsari, which resembles a large crystal "Stupa with Many Doors of Auspiciousness" (bkra shis sgo mang mchod rten). An explanation on how to calculate that number is given in Pema Karpo's description of Tsari. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsari - There are three levels at which one can circumambulate the holy mountain of Tsari: upper, intermediate and lower. The last one, known as Tsari Rong Khor, the Circumambulation of the Ravines of Tsari (tsari rong bskor), is exceedingly difficult and was done only once every twelve years, in the Monkey Year. Because of its blessing and rarity, this event attracted tens of thousands of pilgrims. These were confronted by many difficulties. The southern part of the pilgrimage led through low altitudes and the pilgrims had to travel under the cover of tropical forests so thick that the sky could not be seen for hours on end. The humidity, moreover, was so intense that their woollen and felt clothing, suited to the dry, cold climate of the highlands, would rot. Sometimes the pilgrims had to walk along dangerous cliffs and cross turbulent rivers on vertiginous ladders or on bridges made from the slippery trunks of trees. Another danger came from the savage Lhopa tribes scattered throughout the forest, who would attack unaccompanied travelers with poisoned arrows, and often kill them. In an attempt to prevent such incidents, every twelve years, the Tibetan government would send up to a hundred loads of gifts and offer incentives to the Lhopas to pacify them while the pilgrimage was taking place. After an agreement had been reached, a swearing ceremony was held (See House of the Turquoise Roof, pp.90-91, summarized below). A gate made of bamboo was erected and the meat of two freshly killed yaks was tied to the post on each side. The Lhopas' representatives would show their good faith by passing under the gate. In passing, each Lhopa would cut a small piece of raw meat from one the carcasses and eat it. But even then they could not be trusted completely, and the government had to send soldiers to protect the pilgrims and guides to lead them on their hazardous journey. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsari Dakpa Shelri. [RY]

Tsari is a mountain in southern Tibet sacred to the deity Chakrasamvara (see chap.10). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsari is identified as both Caritra and Devikota, two of the twenty-four great sacred places described in the tantras. For an analysis of the identification of Tsari as these two sacred places, see Huber (1992, vol.2). For a summary of the guidebook to Tsari by the eight Drukchen, Chökyi Nangwa, see Filibeck (1988). There are four main gateways to the Pure Crystal Mountain of Tsari (dag pa shel ri): the eastern one is that of Manjusri; the southern, of Vajrapani; the western, of Tara; and the northern, of Avalokitesvara. According to Kunkhyen Pema Karpo (see Bibliography), the general sequence of human entry into the Tsari mandala is as follows: Guru Padmasambhava entered through the southern door and remained seven years in the Magnificent Secret Cave (zil chen gsang phug, see JK, vol. Da, p.104). Vimalamitra, too, traveled miraculously to Tsari. Lawapa (la ba pa, or Kambalapada, tenth century), a teacher of Atisha, entered through the eastern door with his disciple Bhusuku, and later departed to the Buddhafield of Khechara (mkha' spyod), without leaving his physical body behind. Kyebu Yeshe Dorje (skyes bu, also spelled skye bo, ye shes rdo rje, twelfth century, an incarnation of Nyang Ben Tingdzin Zangpo (see TN p.515), tried thrice to enter Tsari according to the prediction of Gampopa, his teacher (see JK, vol. Da, p.104). The third time, Yeshe Dorje was able to enter through the western door and reached the Turquoise Lake (g.yu mtsho). He also opened the door to the Lake of the Black Mandala (mtsho mandal nag po), in Dagpo; there, together with Gampopa, he concealed as terma the Teaching on Mind, the Wish-fulfilling Gem (sems khrid yid bzhin nor bu). Tsangpa Gyare Yeshe Dorje (gtsang pa rgya ras ye shes rdo rje, 1161-1211, not to be confused with Kyebu Yeshe Dorje) went to Tsari, following a prediction given to him in a vision by Gyalwa Lorepa (rgyal ba lo ras pa, 1187-1250). After Tsangpa Gyare had opened the door of the sacred place he had a vision at the Turquoise Lake Palace, in which Chakrasamvara told him, "You will become the Buddha known as The Young Aspirant (chung mos pa), the youngest of the 1002 Buddhas of this kalpa, and your teachings will spread far and wide from here, to the distance of eighteen days of an vulture's flight." Drigung Jigten Gonpo ('jig rten mgon po, 1143-1217) sent to Tsari first three of his main disciples, headed by Nyö Gyalwa Lhanangpa (gnyos rgyal ba lha nang pa), and then a great number of hermits (see chap. 11, note 10). Finally Sonam Gyaltsen (bsod nams rgyal mtshan), from Ralung, entered through the northern door. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsari-like Jewel Rock. [RY]

Tsarong (tsha rong): this noble family, whose estate was near Sakya, descends from the famous Tibetan physician, Yuthok Yontan Gonpo. (See Petech, 1973, pp.134-8) [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsasum Drildrub (rtsa gsum sgril sgrub) [LW1] [RY]

Tsa-tsa (tshva tshva). A small clay image of a buddha stamped from a mold. [RY]

tsa-tsa [LW1] [RY]

Tsa-tsas are small stupas molded in clay or other material. When made for the sake of a dead person, funeral ashes are mixed with the clay, and later the tsa-tsas are deposited in holy places or in a clean natural environment. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsawa Ridge [LW1] [RY]

Tsechik (rtse gcig). The first stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]

Tsechok Ling Yongdzin Pandita Kachen Yeshe Gyaltsen (tshe mchog gling yong 'dzin bka' chen ye shes rgyal mtshan, 1713-1793), a learned and accomplished sage who lived most of his life as a renunciate and was the founder of Samten Ling Monastery in Kyirong. he was, as well, the tutor of the eighth Dalai Lama, Jampel Gyatso ('jam dpal rgya mtsho, 1758-1804). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsechu Cham. [RY]

Tsedrub Dorje Trengwa. [RY]

Tsegyal. [RY]

Tsegyeh Gonpa (rtse brgyad dgon pa), the only monastery on the banks of Rakkas Tal Lake. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Tsele Natsog Rangdrol (1608-?) [MR]

Tsele Natsok Rangdröl (rtse le sna tshogs rang grol). (b. 1608) Important master of the Kagyü and Nyingma schools. He is also the author of Mirror of Mindfulness and Lamp of Mahamudra, both Shambhala Publications. [ZL] [RY]

Tseleh Rinpoche. Tseleh Rinpoche: (rtse-le sna-tshogs rang-grol) Tseleh Natsok Rangdrol (born 1608), was one of Rigdzin Jatson Nyingpo's principal pupils. Works by him presently available in English are "The Lamp of Mahamudra" and "The Mirror of Mindfulness". [Peter Roberts]

Tsemang of Denma (ldan ma rtse mang). Important early Tibetan translator of the Tripitaka. Extremely well-versed in writing, his style of calligraphy is continued to the present day. Having received transmission of Vajrayana from Padmasambhava, he had realization and achieved perfect recall. He is said to be the chief scribe who wrote down many termas including the Assemblage of Sugatas connected to the Eight Sadhana Teachings. [ZL] [RY]

Tsemon Ling Ngawang Tsultrim regent until his death 1791 [MR]

TSEN (btsan). A type of evil spirit.[AL] [RY]

tsen [LW1] [RY]

Tsen spirits (btsan). [ZL] [RY]

Tsenthang temple in Yarlung (yar klung btsan thang gi lha khang). [ZL] [RY]

T continued - T5


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 13:20, 12 August 2008 (EDT)