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'''[[The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity]]''' (Front Cover)
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Sa chen Kunga Nyingpo (sa chen kun dga' snying po): 1092-1158. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]
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Sa chen Kunga Nyingpo, son of Konchog Gyalpo, (sa chen kun dga' snying po): 1092-1158 [MR]
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Sabbu land of Shang (shangs kyi zab bu lung) [LW1] [RY]
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Sabchu Rinpoche. [RY]
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Sabdun Chalag. [RY]
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Sabdun Phurba (zab bdun phur ba). One of the major termas revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa the sacred dances of which are performed yearly at Rumtek Monastery in Sikkim. [RY]
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Sabdun Phurba. [RY]
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Sabpa Khordun (zab pa skor bdun). One of the major termas revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sacred commitment (dam tshig), Skt. samaya). See samaya. [ZL] [RY]
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Sacred Great Perfection (bka' rdzogs pa chen po). See Dzogchen, Ati Yoga, and Great Perfection. [ZL] [RY]
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Sacred Incantation (gzungs), Skt. dharani). A particular type of mantra, usually quite long. [ZL] [RY]
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Sacred medicine (sman sgrub). [RY]
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Sacred objects related to body, speech and mind (sku gsung thugs rten) - Statues symbolize the enlightened body; books symbolize enlightened speech; and stupas, vajra, bells, and other sacred objects symbolize enlightened mind. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sacred Peace Deity Tantra (zhi ba dam pa lha'i rgyud). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. In the Golden Garland Chronicles this same text is named Peaceful Vajradhatu Tantra (zhi ba rdo rje dbyings kyi rgyud). [ZL] [RY]
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sacred places and countries (gnas yul) [LW1] [RY]
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sacred places and countries; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Sacred thread, brahma sutra, (tshangs skud). Thread worn over the shoulder by brahmans. [RY]
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Sadaprarudita (rtag tu ngu). The 'Ever-Weeping' bodhisattva of a past aeon used as an example for unwavering devotion and perseverance. He is mentioned in the Prajnaparamita scriptures. (see [[Chapter XXX — Sadaprarudita (RiBa)]] [RY]
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Saddharma Pundarika Sutra (dam chos pad-ma dkar po'i mdo). 'The Sutra of the White Lotus of the Sacred Dharma.' Famous Mahayana scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana (sgrub thabs) lit. 'means of attainment'; special tantric practices for gaining certain spiritual attainments. [RY]
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Sadhana (sgrub thabs). 'Means of accomplishment.' Tantric liturgy and procedure for practice usually emphasizing the development stage. The typical sadhana structure involves a preliminary part including the taking of refuge and arousing bodhichitta, a main part involving visualization of a buddha and recitation of the mantra, and a concluding part with dedication of merit to all sentient beings.[Primer] [RY]
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Sadhana (sgrub thabs). 'Means of accomplishment.' Tantric liturgy and procedure for practice usually emphasizing the development stage. The typical sadhana structure involves a preliminary part including the taking of refuge and arousing bodhichitta, a main part involving visualization of a buddha and recitation of the mantra, and a concluding part with dedication of merit to all sentient beings. [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana (sgrub thabs). Tantric rite for deity practice, [RY]
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sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva) [LW1] [RY]
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sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva) [LWx] [RY]
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Sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva). [RY]
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Sadhana of Amitayus and Hayagriva Combined (nye brgyud tshe rta zung 'brel 'chi med dpal gter) is a sadhana that was prophesied in a terma concealed by Guru Padmasambhava in the Magnificent Secret Cave (gzil chen gsang phug) at Tsari and revealed by the great siddha Thangtong Gyalpo; see Compendium of Sadhanas (sgrub thabs kun btus, vol.1, pp. 439). The sadhana texts presented in the Rinchen Terdzö (vol. Tshi, pp.191-204) combine the three traditions of the Canonical Transmission (bka' ma), Spiritual Treasures (gter ma) and Pure Visions (dag snang). On this longevity practice, see J.Gyatso (1981, 142-69). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sadhana of Primordially Pure Innate Nature of Awakened Mind (ye nas dag pa chos nyid byang chub sems kyi sgrub pa). [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana of the Glorious Assemblage of Sugatas (dpal bde gshegs 'dus pa'i sgrub thabs). Text belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga composed by Guru Rinpoche. See also Assemblage of Sugatas. [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana of the Moist Compound of Samaya Substance of the Nine Crescents (zla gam dgu pa dam rdzas rlon sbyor gyi sgrub pa). [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana Section (sgrub sde), of Mahayoga; expl. [LW1] [RY]
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Sadhana Section (sgrub sde). One of the two major aspects of Mahayoga scriptures, the other being the Tantra Section. See also 'Assemblage of Sugatas' or Mahayoga. [ZL] [RY]
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Sadhana Section (sgrub sde); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Sadhana support (sgrub rten) [RY]
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Safeguard-ransoms (glud). A ceremony in which evil spirits are given an effigy of the afflicted person.[EMP] [RY]
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Saga Dawa (sa ga zla ba), the fourth month of the Tibetan lunar calendar. It is a special month for practice and performing virtuous actions since the birth, enlightenment, and parinirvana of Buddha Sakyamuni all fall in this month. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sage, the Great mahamuni, (thub pa chen po). Epithet of the Buddha Shakyamuni ('the Sage of the Shakyas'). [RY]
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Saha (mi mjed) [LW1] [RY]
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Saha (mi mjed); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Saha (Skt., mi mjed). The name of our present world system. It means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. [RY]
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Saha {mi mjed}. World of Patient Endurance. The name of this present universe, where the emotions are so strong that beings cannot bear them. [RY]
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Saha world (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten gyi khams). The name of our present world system. Saha means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also mean 'undivided' because the karmas and kleshas, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated.[EMP] [RY]
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Saha World (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten) Our known world system; the 'World of Endurance,' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also means 'Undivided' because the karmas and disturbing emotions, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated. [RY]
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SAHA WORLD (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten) Our known world system; the 'World of Endurance,' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also mean 'Undivided' because the karmas and disturbing emotions, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated.[AL] [RY]
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Saha world-system (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten gyi khams). The name of our present world system. Saha means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. [ZL] [RY]
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Saha; [LWx] [RY]
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Sa-hor - Kingdom associated with the early transmission of the Tantra; home of Santaraksita; also spelled Za-hor or Sahora. [Tarthang]
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Sahor / Sa hor - () Kingdom associated with the early transmission of the Tantra; home of Shantarakshita; also spelled Zahor or Sahora [RY]
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Sahor. [Daki] [RY]
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Saicho - Founder of the Japanese Tendai school and the Tendai center on Mt. Hiei [RY]
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Saicho - Founder of the Japanese Tendai school and the Tendai Center on Mt. Hiei. [Tarthang]
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Sakya - The throne-holders Ngakchang Kunga Gyaltsen (sngags 'chang kun dga' rgyal mtshan) and Gonpo Ngodrup Pelbar (mgon po dngos grub dpal 'bar) were the two youngest among the four sons of Wangdu Nyingpo (dbang 'dus snying po, the thirty-third throne-holder of Sakya, 1765-1806). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sakya (sa skya). One of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism. It was established in the eleventh century by Drogmi Lotsawa ('brog mi lo tsa ba), a disciple of the Indian master Virupa. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Sakya / Sa skya - Tibetan school of Buddhism established in the eleventh century by 'Brog mi [RY]
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Sakya / The sa skya school traces its lineage to 'Brog mi shakya ye shes (b. 1147), who studied with the Mahasiddha Virupa. Five great masters continued the lineage: Kun dga' snying po, bSod rnams rtse mo, Grags pa rgyal mtshan, Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (Sa skya Pandita), and 'Gro mgon chos rgyal ('Phags pa). The Sa skya tradition emphasizes both study and practice, especially favoring the Hevajra Tantra. [RY]
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Sakya Chogden, Serdog Panchen (gser mdog pan chen sa kya mchog ldan) : 1428-1507 [MR]
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Sakya Chogden, Serdog Panchen (sa kya mchog ldan gser mdog pan chen) : 1428-1507 [MR]
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Sakya Gongma. [RY]
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Sakya Pandita (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan), grand son of Kunga Nyingpo: 1182-1251 [MR]
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Sakya Pandita (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan): 1182-1251. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]
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Sakya Pandita / Sa skya Pandita - Thirteenth century Tibetan master and scholar who exercised political power on behalf of the Mongols; also known as Sa pan [RY]
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Sakya Pandita {sa pan}. (1182-1251). Important Sakyapa master, also called Kunga Gyaltsen. [RY]
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Sakya Pandita, Kunga Gyaltsen (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan, 1182-1251), wrote the Distinctive Features of the Three Vows (sdom gsum rab 'byed). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sakya Pandita; [LWx] [RY]
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Sakya School [LWx] [RY]
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Sakya tradition of Khon. [RY]
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Sakya Trichen Ngawang Thuthob Wangdrag: 1900-1950 [MR]
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Sakya. [RY]
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Sakya; (sa skya) The seat of the Sakya school, Sakya was founded by Konchog Gyalpo of the powerful Khön family, in 1073. Its main temple, the impressive Great Miraculously Appeared Temple was erected in 1268, and it is the only building among the over hundred temples of Sakya's monastic complex which survived the Chinese destruction. [MR]
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Sakya; Monastery [LW1] [RY]
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Sakyapa (sa skya pa). A follower of the Sakya lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. [RY]
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Sakyapas {sa kya pa}. One of the schools of the new tradition, founded by Khon Konchog Gyalpo (1034-1102). [RY]
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Saleh Ö (gsal le 'od), the famous female disciple of Jetsun Milarepa. The verses quoted here show slight differences from those found in most editions of the Hundred Thousand Songs (mgur 'bum). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Salnang of Ba [LW1] [RY]
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Salty River Sutra (Tib. ba tshwa can gyi chu klung gi mdo) is not found in the list of content of Derge Kangyur (sde dge bka' 'gyur). This declaration may be one of those verses which are found as quotes in translated commentaries, whereas the original sutras to which they belong have been lost, or were never translated into Tibetan. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Salu Sprout Sutra (sa lu ljang ba'i mdo) [LWx] [RY]
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Samadhi (ting (nge) 'dzin). Concentration for the mind on a single object. [RY]
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Samadhi (ting nge 'dzin). 'Adhering to the continuity of evenness.' A state of [[undistracted concentration]] or [[meditative absorption]] which in the context of [[Vajrayana]] can refer to either the [[development stage]] or the [[completion stage]]. [AL] [RY]
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samadhi (ting nge 'dzin); doors; four; mundane; of dhyana; of noble beings; of the stream of Dharma; of united means and knowledge; supreme training; that tames all the hordes of Mara; that tames the hordes of Mara; unconditioned virtue; undefiled aggregate of; vajralike [LW1] [RY]
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Samadhi {ting nge 'dzin}. State of deep concentration. [RY]
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Samadhi of Courageous Movement (dpa' bar 'gro ba'i ting nge 'dzin). The surangama samadhi described in the Surangama Sutra. [RY]
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Samadhi of Magical Illusion (sgyu 'phrul gyi ting nge 'dzin). [RY]
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Samadhi of suchness (de bzhin nyid kyi ting nge 'dzin). The first of the 'three samadhis.' See Light of Wisdom, Vol. 2, pgs 88-89. [RY]
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[[Samadhi of Suchness]]. The first of the 'Three Samadhis.' The samadhi of suchness, of illumination and of the seed-syllable. The samadhi of suchness is to rest in the composure of the innate emptiness of all phenomena, as pointed out by one's root master, or simply to imagine that all things are empty like space. The samadhi of illumination is let natural compassion manifest like sunlight illuminating the sky, or simply to generate compassion for all the beings who fail to realize the nature of things. The samadhi of the seed-syllable is the innate unity of emptiness and compassion manifesting in the form of a syllable that is the 'seed' or source from which the deity and the entire mandala will appear during the practice. These three samadhis are the indispensible framework for the development stage of Vajrayana practice. In his Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo, Padmasambhava says, "The main part begins with the profound and vast samadhis Which purify the manner of death, bardo, and rebirth: The great emptiness space of suchness is pure like the sky. Rest evenly in this space of the undivided two truths. Emanate the magic of compassion, an all-illuminating cloud of awareness, filling the space, radiant yet without fixation. The single mudra in the manner of a subtle syllable Is the causal seed which produces everything. Keep this changeless wisdom essence, manifests in space, one-pointedly in mind and bring its vivid presence to perfection. For more details, see Light of Wisdom, Vol. 2, pgs 88-89.[Primer] [RY]
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Samadhi of the first dhyana (bsam gtan dang po'i ting nge 'dzin). See 'first dhyana.' [RY]
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Samadhi of the Majestic Lion (seng ge bsgyings pa'i ting nge 'dzin). Described in the 'Flower Adornment Sutra,' Vol. III, Shambhala Publications. [RY]
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samadhi of the stream of Dharma [LWx] [RY]
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samadhi-doors [LWx] [RY]
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Samadhisattva. Meditation Deity. (ting 'dzin sems dpa'). This refers to what is within the heart of the deity or insignia within one's own heart.The innermost of the succession of "sattvas" that are visualised. It is usually in the form of a seed syllable. [Peter Roberts]
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Samaja ('dus pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Samaja Root Tantra ('dus pa rtsa rgyud) [LW1] [RY]
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Samaja Root Tantra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
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Samaja; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
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Samantabhadra (kun tu bzan gpo; all good) The primordial, dharmakaya buddha, blue in color and naked, often depicted in consort with Prajna, who is white in color. [Rain of Wisdom]
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Samantabhadra (Kun tu bzang po) lit. 'All-good'; the Adibuddha who through ceaseless meditation gives rise to the Dhyanibuddhas; representation of the ultimate nature of reality. [RY]
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Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po), the "Ever Perfect" primordial Buddha. In the primordial universal ground, there are neither sentient beings, nor Buddhas; neither ignorance, nor enlightenment. It is a state of natural, unchanging perfection beyond conditions and concepts. When the first manifestation of phenomena arises from the primordial ground, to recognize that this arising is the display of one's own awareness leads instantaneously to the primordial Buddhahood of Samantabhadra. Not recognizing this to be the case, and taking phenomena and beings to be real entities distinct from oneself, leads instantaneously to the ignorance of sentient beings.  [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po). The 'Ever-excellent One.' 1) The primordial dharmakaya buddha. 2) The bodhisattva Samantabhadra used as the example for the perfection of increasing an offering infinitely. [ZL] [RY]
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SAMANTABHADRA (kun tu bzang po). The 'Ever-excellent One.' 1) The primordial dharmakaya buddha. 2) The bodhisattva Samantabhadra used as the example for the perfection of increasing an offering infinitely. [AL] [RY]
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Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po); enlightenment in the original ground of liberation; Original Protector; the bodhisattva [LW1] [RY]
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Samantabhadra {kun tu bzang po}. The original Buddha who has never fallen into delusion. He is the Dharmakaya Buddha represented as a darkblue naked figure without ornaments in union with his consort Samantabhadri, symbolizing the unity of awareness and emptiness. It can also mean the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra, one of the eight close sons of the Buddha. Through the power of his concentration he miraculously multiplied the offerings he made. [RY]
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Samantabhadra is the Bodhisattva who made boundless offerings by emanating innumerable bodies like himself, each of which made offerings filling the sky. They in turn emanated innumerable bodies that also made offerings and so on, ad infinitum. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Samantabhadra offering cloud (kun bzang mchod sprin). An immense cloud of offering as emanated by the bodhisattva Samantabhadra. [RY]
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Samantabhadra; enlightenment in the original ground of liberation; expl.; the bodhisattva; [LWx] [RY]
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Samantabhadramitabha. Samantabhadramitabha is a composite name of Samantabhadra, the Dharmakaya Buddha, and Amitabha. Here they are inseparable as a naked blue Buddha. [Peter Roberts]
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Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo) [LW1] [RY]
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Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo), the consort of the primordial Buddha Samantabhadra, the Ever-Perfect (see Author's Introduction, note 3). Their union symbolizes the inseparability of the phenomenal world and emptiness. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo). See under Ever-excellent Lady. [ZL] [RY]
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Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo). The consort of Samantabhadra. [RY]
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Samantabhadri (Kun tu bzang po) lit. 'the All-good'; the mother of all the Buddhas of the three times; the female or prajna (wisdom) counterpart of the Adibuddha Samantabhadra. [RY]
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Samantabhadri Tantra of the Sun of the Luminous Expanse (kun tu bzang mo klong gsal nyi ma'i rgyud). [ZL] [RY]
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Samantabhadri. [Daki] [RY]
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Samantabhadri; [LWx] [RY]
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Samaya (dam tshig). 1) The sacred pledge, precepts or commitment of Vajrayana practice. Many details exists, but the samayas essentially consist of outwardly, maintaining harmonious relationship with the vajra master and one's Dharma friends and, inwardly, not straying from the continuity of the practice. 2) At the end of a chapter, the single word 'samaya' means is an oath that what has been stated is true. [RY]
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samaya (dam tshig); expl. of use at the end of an instruction; retaining empowerment; seal; vajra [LW1] [RY]
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Samaya {dam tshig}. Precepts taken in the Secret Mantra Vajrayana. [RY]
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Samaya being (dam tshig sems dpa'), (dam tshig pa). The deity visualized by oneself. [RY]
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Samaya beings and wisdom beings (dam ye), dam tshig pa dang ye shes pa). The deity visualized by oneself and the innate deity abiding in dharmadhatu. [RY]
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Samaya dakinis. [RY]
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Samaya mudra (dam tshig gi phyag rgya). One of the four mudras. [RY]
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Samaya perverters (dam sri). A certain malevolent spirit. [RY]
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Samayasattva (dam tshig sems dpa') See 'samaya being.' [RY]
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Samayasattva. Commitment-Deity. Skt: Samayasattva. Tib: dam.tshig sems.dpa'. Though the Sanskrit word is the same, there is a differentiation in Tibetan into the above and dam.tshig.pa. This latter is the deity that oneself creates with one's own mind, due to the commitment that one has made following which the ye-shes-pa (Jnanasattava "Wisdom Deity"), the actual deity will be invited. The Damtsig sempa that we have here however, is a differentiation of aspects of the visualisation of the deity. The visualisation of oneself as the deity is termed the commitment-deity, (Samayasattva or Damtsig Sempa), and the deity visualised in one's heart is termed the Wisdom Deity, (Jnanasattva or Yeshe Sempa). Though the terms in Sanskrit, and here in English, are identical, they must be understood to have quite different meanings. [Peter Roberts]
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Samayoga Tantra (rgyud mnyam sbyor) [LW1] [RY]
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Samayoga Tantra (rgyud mnyam sbyor); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Samayoga Tantra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
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Sambhogakaya - An aspect or 'embodiment' of the Buddha that manifests to Bodhisattvas having attained a certain stage of realization [RY]
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Sambhogakaya - An aspect or 'embodiment' of the Buddha that manifests to Bodhisattvas having attained a certain stage of realization. [Tarthang]
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Sambhogakaya - see Three Kayas. [RY]
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sambhogakaya (long sku). See three kayas; yidams [LW1] [RY]
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Sambhogakaya (longs (spyod rdzogs pa'i) sku, longs spyod). 'Enjoyment Body' the Body endowed with the thirty-two Marks and eighty minor signs that a buddha displays to Arya Bodhisattvas in a Pure Land, teaching the Mahayana until the end of samsara. [RY]
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Sambhogakaya (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). See 'three kayas'.[Primer] [RY]
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Sambhogakaya (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). The 'body of perfect enjoyment.' In the context of the 'five kayas of fruition,' sambhogakaya is the semi-manifest form of the buddhas endowed with the 'five perfections' of perfect teacher, retinue, place, teaching and time which is perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the ten levels. [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY]
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SAMBHOGAKAYA (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). The 'body of perfect enjoyment.' In the context of the 'five kayas of fruition,' sambhogakaya is the semi-manifest form of the buddhas endowed with the 'five perfections' of perfect teacher, retinue, place, teaching and time which is perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the ten levels. [AL] [RY]
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Sambhogakaya {longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku}. Body of perfect enjoyment. This is the spontaneously luminous aspect of Buddhahood perceptible to realized beings. [RY]
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Sambhogakaya attire (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i chas). The five silken garments and the eight jewel ornaments. [RY]
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Sambhogakaya costume. The sambhogakaya costume consists of eight kinds of jewellery and five silk garments: A crown, earrings, a short necklace, a middle-length necklace, a very long necklace, armlets, bracelets and anklets. There are variations, for example, a belt may be listed instead of the armlets. There are variant lists of the silk garments, sometimes differing in the interpretation of what the clothing referred to in the Tantras are. The Tibetan pictorial representations of deities has developed its own iconography, which does not necessarily match the descriptions given in the actual Tantras. The colours of the garments can vary with specific deities. 1.Crown-ribbons of five colours. 2.A large blue silk ribbon hanging from the rear of the crown. 3.A shawl of white silk with gold embroidery. 4.A very short green blouse the hem of which is above the breasts. 5.A skirt of dark maroon decorated with parallel lines of gold, or with bands of rainbow colours. If the blue crown-ribbon is counted as one  with the other crown-ribbons, then the fifth garment is enumerated as a silken belt next to the precious belt, that is knotted at the front, its two ends hanging loosely. The shawl is sometimes interpreted as being the blouse, and the wide blue ribbon at the rear of the crown is identified as a long silken scarf. However, the above description would appear to be more precise. [Peter Roberts]
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Sambhogakaya Great Compassion (longs sku thugs rje chen po). Same as Avalokiteshvara. [ZL] [RY]
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Sambhogakaya Great Compassionate One (longs sku thugs rje chen po). Same as Avalokiteshvara. [RY]
 +
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Sambhogakaya luminosity (longs sku'i 'od gsal). The luminosity during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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 +
sambhogakaya See trikaya. [Rain of Wisdom]
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 +
Sambhuti (sam bhu ti) is the Exposition Tantra of the Two Discernments (brtag gnyis bshad rgyud), meaning "union" (kha sbyor), or "perfectly united" (yang dag par kha sbyor). [RY]
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Sambhuti [LW1] [RY]
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Sambhuti Tantra (Skt.). [EMP] [RY]
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Sambhuti; expl.; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
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Sameness of space and wisdom (dbyings dang ye shes mnyam pa nyid). [RY]
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Samkhya [LWx] [RY]
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 +
Sammatiya. prominent Hinayanist school, to which in the seventh century more than a quarter of the Buddhist monks in India were counted as belonging. They were notorious for their heretical, 'Personalist' views and often their bigotry and moral depravity. [RY]
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Sampa Lhündrub (bsam pa lhun grub). A supplication to Guru Rinpoche as well as a terma of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sampa Lhündrub (bsam pa lhun grub); inner sadhana; Tukdrub Yishin Norbu [LW1] [RY]
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Sampa Lhündrub Yishin Norbu. [RY]
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Sampa Lhundrub, the inner practice. A supplication to Guru Rinpoche as well as a terma of Chokgyur Lingpa.[Primer] [RY]
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Sampa Lhündrub; inner sadhana (bsam pa lhun grub) [LWx] [RY]
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Samsara ('khor (ba); also bhava, srid ). The state of continually having to take rebirth under the control of karma and defilements. [RY]
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Samsara ('khor ba). 'Cyclic existence,' 'vicious circle' or 'round' of birth and death and rebirth within the six realms of existence, characterized by suffering, impermanence, and ignorance. The state of ordinary sentient beings fettered by ignorance and dualistic perception, karma and disturbing emotions. Ordinary reality, an endless cycle of frustration and suffering generated as the result of karma. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]
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samsara ('khor ba); causes of; characteristics of; conditions for; creator of; origin according to Dzogchen .  (Ref. Light of Wisdom, vol. 1 pg. 311) [LW1] [RY]
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Samsara {'khor ba}. Cyclic existence where beings go around from one birth to another through the karmic force of their actions [RY]
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Samsara and Nirvana ('khor 'das). Pure and impure phenomena. [RY]
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Samsaric ('khor ba'i). Of or pertaining to samsara; worldly, mundane, profane. [ZL] [RY]
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Samsaric existence ('khor ba'i srid pa). See 'samsara.' [RY]
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Samten Gyamtso (bsam gtan rgya mtsho). The root guru of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. [RY]
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Samten Gyamtso Namkha Drimey (bsam gtan rgya mtsho nam mkha' dri med). See Samten Gyatso. [RY]
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Samten Gyatso Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]
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Samten Kangsar. [RY]
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Samten Palpa of Gomo: 1291-1366 [MR]
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Samten Palpa of Gomo: 1291-1366. [RY]
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Samvarodaya (sdom 'byung) [LW1] [RY]
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Samvarodaya (sdom 'byung); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
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Samye (bsam yas). The temple built by King Trisong Deutsen and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. [RY]
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Samye (bsam yas). The wondrous temple complex built by King Trisong Deutsen (790-844) and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche. A major center of the early transmission. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. It is also known as Glorious Samye, the Unchanging and Spontaneously Accomplished Temple. [ZL] [RY]
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Samye (bsam yas). The wondrous temple complex, modeled after the Indian monastery Odantapuri, built by King Trisong Deutsen (790-844) and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche in 814. A major center of the early transmission of Buddhism in Tibet. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. It is also known as Glorious Temple of Samye, the Unchanging and Spontaneously Fulfillment of Boundless Wishes. Its three stories are of Indian, Chinese and Tibetan designs. See The Lotus-born (Shambhala Publications).[AL] [RY]
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Samye (bsam yas); description of; middle story; Unchanging and Spontaneously Perfected Temple [LW1] [RY]
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Samye / bSam yas - Tibetan temple and monastery founded by Padmasambhava, Khri srong lde btsan, and Shantarakshita; center of the early transmission [RY]
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Samye caught fire: 1816 [MR]
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Samye Chimphu - The place where Guru Padmasambhava gave the first empowerment (abhiseka) in Tibet to King Trisong Detsen and to seven other disciples, each of whom was entrusted with the practice upon one the Eight Herukas of the Eight Canons of Accomplishment (sgrub pa bka' brgyad). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Samye Chimphu (bsam yas chims phu). A mountain retreat situated above the temple of Samye. [RY]
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Samye Chimphu (bsam yas chims phu). The sacred place of Padmasambhava's speech. A mountain retreat situated four hours walk above Samye. During the last twelve centuries numerous great masters have meditated in the caves at this hermitage. [ZL] [RY]
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SAMYE CHIMPHU (bsam yas chims phu). The sacred place of Padmasambhava's speech. A mountain retreat situated four hours walk above Samye. During the last twelve centuries numerous great masters have meditated in the caves at this hermitage.[AL] [RY]
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Samye debate: 792? [MR]
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Samye is completed : 814 [MR]
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Samye Mingyur Lhungyi Drubpa (bsam yas mi 'gyur lhun gyis grub pa). Samye temple, established by Padmasambhava, King trisong Deutsen and Shantarakshita. It's building commenced in 762, ended in 766 and it was consecrated in 767. [Peter Roberts]
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Samye, monastery;, (bsam yas). The first monastery built in Tibet, by Guru Padmasambhava, where the Buddhist canonical scriptures were translated into Tibetan, and where Guru Rinpoche gave many profound teachings and initiations. [MR]
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Samye; description of; [LWx] [RY]
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Sanctuary of the Changeless Supreme Teaching (bstan mchog 'gyur med gling) [LW1] [RY]
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Sandal Grove charnel ground (tsan dan tshal gyi dur khrod). The Golden Garland Chronicles (p. 179) describes this place as: 'The eminent celestial sacred place of the vidyadharas, the wild jungle which is a crossroad on the secret path of great bliss.' It is also counted among the traditional Eight Charnel Grounds. [ZL] [RY]
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Sandhi Vyakarana (dgongs pa lung ston) [LW1] [RY]
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Sangdak Dorje Bechön (gsang bdag rdo rje be con) [LW1] [RY]
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Sangdak Dorje Bechön; [LWx] [RY]
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Sangdok Palri (zangs mdog dpal ri). The Glorious Copper colored Mountain, the pure land of Guru Rinpoche situated on the south-western continent of Camara (rnga g.yab). [RY]
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Sangdok Palri, the Glorious Copper Colored Mountain. [Daki] [RY]
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Sangha - the community of those practicing the teachings of the Buddha, united by their vision and their commitment to the path. In order to lay the foundation for Dharma practice, various forms of discipline are undertaken. Eight traditional kinds of Sangha exist: bhikshu and bhikshuni: fully ordained monks and nuns: Shramanara and shramani: novices who have taken preliminary vows; shiksamana: aspirants too young to join the community but who follow special rules; upavasta: laymen of laywomen who take monk's vows for a certain limited time; upasaka and upasika: laymen and laywomen who practice Buddhist teachings follow five precepts: not to kill, not to steal, not to lie, not to take intoxicating substances, not to engage in sexual misconduct. [RY]
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Sangha (dge 'dun). 'Community, congregation'. The Sangha in which one takes Refuge is the Community of Saints, or Arya Beings - those of the Hinayana, the Shravaka and Pratyeka-buddha Aryas; those of the Mahayana, the Arya Bodhisattvas and Buddhas; and those of the Vajrayana, the Heroes, Dakinis, etc. This is Ultimate Sangha; Relative Sangha is the community of ordained monks and nuns, which should be honored as representing the actual Sangha Refuge just as Buddha images and sacred texts should be revered as representing the actual Buddha and Dharma. [RY]
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Sangha (dge 'dun). The community of practitioners usually the fully ordained monks and nuns or the ngakpas. The Noble Sangha means those who have achieved the path of seeing among the five paths and therefore are liberated from samsara. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]
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Sangha (dge 'dun); actual and resembling; expl. qualities; fourfold, of the lesser vehicles; three qualities of freedom; three qualities of knowledge; triple; two aspects and six qualities of [LW1] [RY]
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Sangha {dge 'dun}. The followers of the Buddha who can guide others on the path. It refers to arhats, Bodhisattvas, and ordained monks and nuns etc. In a broader sense it refers to all practitionars of the Buddhist teachings. [RY]
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Sangha; actual and resembling; expl. qualities; three qualities of freedom; three qualities of knowledge; two aspects and six qualities of [LWx] [RY]
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Sanghamitra - Ashoka's daughter and a nun; brought a branch of the Bodhi tree as an emissary to Sri Lanka [RY]
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Sanglingma (zangs gling ma). The name of the text used for this translation of Padmasambhava's life story. See Translator's Preface. [ZL] [RY]
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Sanglingma Life Story by Nyang Ral Nyima Özer (1124-1192). The first known terma biography; 41 chapters, 202 pages. Tibetan title: slob dpon pad-ma 'byung gnas kyi skyes rabs chos 'byung nor bu'i phreng ba, rnam thar zangs gling ma'o. Included by Jamgön Kongtrül the First in the Rinchen Terdzö. The Sanglingma exists also in a longer version of 286 pages. This version, also revealed by Lord Nyang, is so far unpublished but is found at the National Archives, Kathmandu, Nepal. Tibetan title: u rgyan gu ru padma 'byung gnas kyi rnam thar 'bring po zangs gling mar grags pa. The Sanglingma is also present in an extensive two volume version which was banned in Central Tibet due to some clear and damaging predictions about certain ministers' involvement in the decline of Buddhism in Tibet in the twentieth century. This version, 1260 pages, was found in the Mustang region of Nepal and is also available at the National Archives, Kathmandu, Nepal. [ZL] [RY]
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Sang-ngak Lamrim Radiant Jewel Lamp (gsang sngags lam rim rin chen gsal ba'i sgron me) [LW1] [RY]
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Sang-ngak Lamrim Radiant Jewel Lamp (gsang sngags lam rim rin chen gsal ba'i sgron me); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Sang-ngak Phodrang (gsang sngags pho brang). The seat of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sang-ngak Phodrang [LW1] [RY]
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Sang-ngak Rinpoche (gsang sngags rin po che). The brother of Samten Gyatso. [RY]
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Sangri Kharmar; (zangs ri mkhar kmar) The Red Citadel (Kharmar) is thus called because is was built upon a red rock, at the southern extremity of the Copper Mountain (Sangri), overloooking the northern banks of the Tsangpo river. On the cliff-face to the west of the temple (which was destroyed by the Chinese) is Machik Labdrön's (1055-1149) meditation cave. [MR]
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sangs rgyas gsang ba - wo1 254 life story [RY]
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Sangthik Korsum (gsang thig skor gsum). Termas by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sangwa Yeshe cycle of Olkha ('ol kha'i gsang ba ye shes), the sixteen-volume cycle of teachings focused on the dakini "Secret Wisdom" (gsang ba ye shes) according to the visions of Lelung Jedrung Shepai Dorje (sle lung rje drung bzhad pa'i rdo rje, b. 1697) from Olkha, based on the terma revelations of Minling Terchen (see chap.1, note 38). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sangwa Yeshe of Tertön Dechen Gyalpo, see chap.10, note 52. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sangwey Nyingpo (gsang ba'i snying po) [LWx] [RY]
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Sangwey Nyingpo (gsang ba'i snying po). See Guhyagarbha Tantra [LW1] [RY]
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Sangye Gyatso: 1653-1705. [RY]
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Sangye Lama [LW1] [RY]
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Sangye Lingpa (1340-1396). [Daki] [RY]
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Sangye Lingpa (sangs rgyas gling pa). (1340-1396). A reincarnation of the second son of King Trisong Deutsen; a major tertön and revealer of the Lama Gongdü cycle in 13 volumes. Sangye Lingpa means 'Sanctuary of Awakening.'[AL] [RY]
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Sangye Lingpa (sangs rgyas gling pa)1340-1396 [MR]
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Sangye Lingpa [LW1] [RY]
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Sangye Lingpa [LWx] [RY]
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Sangye Nyenpa Drupthob Tashi Paljor: [MR]
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Sangye Nyenpa Drupthob Tashi Paljor:. [RY]
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Sangye Nyenpa. [RY]
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Sangye On (dhar ma seng ge sangs rgyas dbon): 1177-1237 [MR]
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Sangye Yeshe (sangs rgyas ye shes). See Nupchen Sangye Yeshe. [RY]
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Sangye Yeshe of Nub (gnubs sangs rgyas ye shes). One of the twenty-five disciples of Padmasambhava, he was the chief recipient of the Anu Yoga teachings as well as the Yamantaka of Mahayoga. In addition to Guru Rinpoche, his other teachers were Traktung Nagpo and Chögyal Kyong of India, Vasudhara of Nepal, and Chetsen Kye from the country of Drusha. He visited India and Nepal seven times. When the evil king Langdarma attempted to destroy Buddhism in Tibet, Sangye Yeshe instilled fear in the king by causing an enormous scorpion, the size of nine yaks, to magically appear by a single gesture of his right hand. Through this, Langdarma lost the courage to persecute the Vajrayana sangha who dressed in white robes and kept long hair. Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche is considered one of his reincarnations. Sangye Yeshe means 'Buddha Wisdom.' [AL] [RY]
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San-Iun - Chinese Buddhist school based on the [[Madhyamaka]] teachings brought by Kumarajiva. [Tarthang]
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San-lun - Chinese Buddhist school based on the [[Madhyamaka]] teachings brought by Kumarajiva [RY]
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Sanskrit (legs sbyar gyi skad). The language of ancient India. [RY]
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Santideva, (shi ba lha) one of the eighty-four mahasiddha of India. He composed the famous Bodhicaryavatara (byang chub sems dpa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa), "Engaging in the Bodhicitta's Deeds", and the Siksasamuccaya (bslab pa kun las btus pa), the "Collected Precepts" two major texts describing the ideal and practice of a bodhisattva. [MR]
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sara; expl. of meaning [LW1] [RY]
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sara; expl.; expl. of meaning [LWx] [RY]
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Saraha - The sage Rahulabhadra, abbot of Nalanda one of the 84 Siddhas [RY]
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Saraha - The sage Rahulabhadra, abbot of Nalanda; one of the 84 Siddhas. [Tarthang]
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Saraha (sa ra ha). One of the mahasiddhas of India and a master in the Mahamudra lineage. See The Royal Songs of Saraha, Shambhala Publications. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Saraha [LW1] [RY]
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Saraha {sa ra ha}. Indian mahasiddha who was the author of three cycles of dohas. [RY]
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Saraha; quotation by [LWx] [RY]
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Sarasvati - goddess of Euphony and patron of the arts and sciences; early known as goddess of sacred river in northern India and as the goddess of speech and learning; traditionally regarded in India as the source of the Sanskrit language and Devanagri letters. [RY]
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Sarasvati (dbyangs can lha mo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sarasvati (dbyangs can ma). Vedic goddess of a now dried-up river, who became patron deity of poetry, music, science and all the creative arts, and in much this form was adopted into the Buddhist pantheon, with Manjushri as Her consort. [RY]
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Sarasvati; [LWx] [RY]
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Sariputra - One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom. [Tarthang]
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Sariputra, one of the two disciples always depicted at the side of Buddha Sakyamuni. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sarma (gsar ma). See the New Schools. [RY]
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Sarma / gSar ma - The new tradition or new Tantras associated with the second transmission of teachings to Tibet, starting in the eleventh century [RY]
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Sarma / The gSar ma is the general heading of all the Tibetan schools of Buddhism which developed after the 10th century. [RY]
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Sarma and Nyingma (gsar rnying). See also Sarma Schools, Nyingma School; tantras [LW1] [RY]
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Sarma and Nyingma tantras [LWx] [RY]
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Sarma and Nyingma; [LWx] [RY]
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Sarma Schools (gsar ma) [LW1] [RY]
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Sarma Schools (gsar ma). 'New Schools.' The New Schools are Kagyü, Sakya, and Gelug as well as Shijey and Chö, Jordruk, Shangpa Kagyü, and Nyendrup (the Kalachakra system). [ZL] [RY]
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Sarma Schools of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags gsar ma). See New Schools. [RY]
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Sarma Schools; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Sarnath [LW1] [RY]
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Sarvabuddha Samayoga (sangs rgyas mnyam sbyor). 'Equalizing Buddhahood.' A Mahayoga scripture. Three tantras of this name are found in Vol. MA of the Nyingma Gyübum. Sometimes counted among the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras as the tantra of enlightened body. [ZL] [RY]
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Sarvabuddha Samayoga. See Samayoga Tantra [LW1] [RY]
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Sarvastavadin [LW1] [RY]
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Sarvastavadin [LWx] [RY]
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Sarvastivada (thams cad yod par smra ba). 'pan-realism', a prominent and influential Hinayanist school named after their assertion that a dharma exists during all time, wandering from the future to the present when it seems to arise and transferred into the past when it perishes. [RY]
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Sarvastivadin - One of the original eighteen schools, noted for study of Abhidharma; forerunners of the Vaibhashikas [RY]
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Sa-ter. [RY]
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satsas. Satsa. Sanskrit: saccha. These are small images of stupas or deities, made quickly by pressing clay into a mould. This way, one can accumulate the good karma of creating a great number of images in a short time. [Peter Roberts]
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Sattva-paryanka (sems dpa'i skyil krung). Cross-legged sitting posture with the shins flat on the ground forming virtually a straight line, right ankle on top of the left. [RY]
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sattvasana (sems dpa'i skyil krung) A type of cross legged meditation posture in which the legs are very loosely crossed, the right leg being slightly extended out in front. [Rain of Wisdom]
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Sautantrika; expl. view [LWx] [RY]
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Sautrantika - Second major philosophical school, one branch of which was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma. [Tarthang]
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Sautrantika (mdo sde pa)- Second major philosophical school, one branch of which was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma [RY]
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Sautrantika (mdo sde pa). A Hinayana school of philosophy and one of the four major Buddhist School. [RY]
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Sautrantika (mdo sde pa). A hinayana school of philosophy and the second of the four major Buddhist Schools known for its reliance on the sutras rather than Abhidharma.[EMP] [RY]
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Sautrantika School (mdo sde pa); expl. View; viewpoint of the noble potential [LW1] [RY]
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Sautrantika School [LWx] [RY]
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Sautrantika. A Hinayana school of philosophy and second of the four major Buddhist Schools. One of its branchess was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma[Primer] [RY]
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Sautrantika; expl.; viewpoint of the noble potential [LWx] [RY]
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Sciences, the five; vidya sthana, (rig pa'i gnas lnga). Grammar, dialectics, medicine, arts and craft, and religious philosophy. [RY]
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Scriptural transmission (lung). Same as 'reading transmission.' [RY]
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Scripture (mdo), (lung). In the context of this book, a scripture belonging to the category of Anu Yoga or Ati Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture in Eight Chapters (lung bam po brgyad pa). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. Vol. LA of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture of the Compendium of Knowledge (kun 'dus rig pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Scripture of the Compendium of Knowledge (kun 'dus rig pa'i mdo); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
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Scripture of the Embodiment of the Realization of All Buddhas. (sangs rgyas thams cad dgongs pa 'dus pa'i mdo). The Anu Yoga scripture renowned as 'Gongdü'. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture of the Great Assemblage ('dus pa mdo). [EMP] [RY]
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Scripture of the Great Prophesy of Awakened Mind (sems lung chen po'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture of the Play of the Cuckoo Bird of the Charnel Ground (dur khrod khu byug rol pa'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture of the Wisdom Wheel of Awesome Lightning (ye shes rngam pa glog gi 'khor lo'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Scripture on Discernment (lung rnam 'byed) [LW1] [RY]
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Scripture on Discernment (lung rnam 'byed); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
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Scripture(lung) (mdo). In the context of this book, a scripture belonging to the category of Anu Yoga or Ati Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
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Scriptures (lung). See 'tantras, scriptures, and instructions.' [RY]
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Scriptures and realization (lung dang rtogs pa). Authoritative scriptures and the realization of the Dharma in the minds of noble beings. [ZL] [RY]
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Scriptures of the Kadampas, Father and Sons (bka' gdams glegs bam pha chos bu chos): A collection of instructions, questions and answers, stories, songs, prophecies, etc., of Lord Atisha (the father), and his disciples (the sons). Includes 49 sections, 26 for the Father's Dharma, 22 for the Sons' Dharma, and 1 section of miscellanii. The Father Dharma comprises: 1) the byang chub sems dpa'i nor bu phreng ba, a short text in verse on the Bodhisattva Path by Atisha; 2) the 23 sections of the zhus lan nor bu'i phreng ba, authored by Atisha: a series of instructions to Drom Tönpa Gyalwai Jungney and of spiritual conversions between Atisha and Drom. 3) The Sons' Dharma comprises: Collected by legs pa'i shes rab. Lhassa prints, and 2 volume edition (435 pp. and 427 pp.) by Kalsang Lhundup, Buddhist Temple, Vanarasi, 1973-74. (bka' gdams glegs bam, Collected Teachings and Stories of Lord Atisha and His Disciples on the Precious Practice fo the Bka' Gdams Pa Buddhism). [MR]
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Se (sad) mi, mi dun ordained: 767/ or 827 (HHDR) [MR]
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Second Buddha. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]
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Second Buddha; alias Padmasambhava; synonym for Padmasambhava; [LWx] [RY]
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Second Council - Council of 700 Arhats convened at Vaishali one hundred years after the Parinirvana to resolve questions on Vinaya practice [RY]
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Second Council at Vaisali: 383 BC [MR]
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Second Dharma Wheel; see 'Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma' [LWx] [RY]
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Second Dhyana Realm [LWx] [RY]
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Second Dhyana Realm. See Dhyana Realms [LW1] [RY]
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second prince. See Murub Tseypo [LW1] [RY]
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second prince; alias Prince Rölpa Tsal; [LWx] [RY]
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Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gnyis pa). The teachings emphasizing bodhichitta and 'emptiness,' that all phenomena are devoid of a self-entity and true existence.[Primer] [RY]
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Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gnyis pa). The teachings emphasizing 'emptiness,' that all phenomena are devoid of a self-entity and true existence. [RY]
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Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]
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Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma; expl.; see 'Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma' [LWx] [RY]
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Secret Black Moon (zla gsang nag po). The tantra of Manjushri Body. One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]
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Secret Cave at Chimey Taktsang [LW1] [RY]
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Secret Cave at Karmo Taktsang [LW1] [RY]
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Secret conduct (gsang ba'i spyod pa). One of the different types of conduct used as an enhancement practice. [RY]
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Secret Confession of the Four Classes of Dakinis (mkha' 'gro ma rnam bzhi gsang ba'i bshags pa). [ZL] [RY]
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Secret Cycle of Luminosity ('od gsal gsang skor). An aspect of the Instruction Section of Dzogchen. [RY]
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Secret Dakini Path. [RY]
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Secret Document. (gsang thems). "Secret Document" See note 13: [Peter Roberts]
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Secret empowerment (gsang ba'i dbang). The second of the four empowerments. [RY]
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secret empowerment (gsang dbang) [LW1] [RY]
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secret empowerment [LWx] [RY]
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Secret General Tantra. (gsang ba spyi rgyud). In Derge Kangyur it is text 806 in volume Wa. pages 141-168. dkyil 'khor thams cad kyi spyi'i cho ga gsang ba'i rgyud. In Sanskrit: Sarvamandala Samanyavidhinam Guhya Tantra. It also exists in Chinese and Japanese translation. No known Sanskrit original survives. [Peter Roberts]
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secret lower gate [LW1] [RY]
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secret lower gate; [LWx] [RY]
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Secret Mantra (gsang sngags), Skt. guhyamantra. Synonymous with Vajrayana or tantric teachings. 'Guhya' means secret, both concealed and self-secret. 'Mantra' in this context means eminent, excellent, or praiseworthy. [ZL] [RY]
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Secret Mantra (gsang sngags). See also Mantrayana, Vajrayana; master; New Schools; outer and inner sections; path of blessing; Pitaka; Three Outer Tantras [LW1] [RY]
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SECRET MANTRA (gsang sngags, Skt. guhyamantra). Synonymous with Vajrayana or tantric teachings. 'Guhya' means secret, both concealed and self-secret. 'Mantra' in this context means eminent, excellent, or praiseworthy. [AL] [RY]
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Secret Mantra of the Early Translations (gsang sngags snga 'gyur). The Vajrayana system of the Nyingma School the emphasis of which is on the Three Inner Tantras: Mahayoga, Anu Yoga and Ati Yoga. According to Jamgön Kongtrül, the chief scriptures are the Magical Net of Mahayoga, the Embodiment of Realization of Anu Yoga, and the Dzogchen tantras of the Mind Section and Space Section. These are adorned with the Eight Sadhana Teachings while the vital life force is the Instruction Section of Dzogchen, the extract of the realization of Padmasambhava and Vimalamitra which is contained in the collection renowned as Nyingtig Yabshi. See also Three Inner Tantras and Nyingma School. [ZL] [RY]
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Secret Mantra of the greater vehicle (theg pa chen po'i gsang sngags). Vajrayana when regarded as a part of Mahayana. [RY]
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Secret Mantra Palace. [RY]
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Secret Mantra Vajrayana {gsang sngags rdo rje theg pa}. The Secret Mantra Vajrayana is able to make use of relative truth as a path by seeing phenomena as the unlimited display of primordial purity. The six classes of Vajrayana tantras teach this in an increasingly direct and profound way.  The gateway to the Vajrayana is the empowerment, which is given by the spiritual master. [RY]
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secret mantras. See mantras [LW1] [RY]
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secret mantras; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Secret Mantrayana (gsang sngags rdo rje theg pa), a synonym for Vajrayana. See Appendix 1. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Secret Moon Essence (zla gsang thig le). A Mahayoga scripture. Vol. MA of the Nyingma Gyübum. Sometimes counted among the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras as the tantra of enlightened speech. [ZL] [RY]
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Secret Ocean Tantra (gsang ba rgya mtsho'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Secret or innermost obstacles (gsang ba'i bar chad). The habitual tendency for grasping and fixation. [RY]
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secret questions, which are asked of the candidates before they receive full monastic ordination, concern conceivable obstacles to the keeping of the vows, such as not having permission from one's parents, and so forth. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Secret Tantra of the Blazing Sun Expanse of Luminosity (klong gsal 'bar ba nyi ma'i gsang rgyud). [EMP] [RY]
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Secret Treasury of the Dakinis (mkha' 'gro gsang mdzod). [EMP] [RY]
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 +
Secret Wisdom (gsang ba ye shes) cycle is possibly the cycle of termas rediscovered by Kunzang Dechen Gyalpo (see Appendix 4), since, according to GC (vol. 3 226) a former Lhagyari king was a chief disciple and patron of Dechen Gyalpo (see Appendix 4). This could also refers to the cycles of the same name revealed by Minling Terdak Lingpa (1646-1714; see chap.1, note 38) and elaborated by Lelung Shepai Dorje (sle lung bzhad pa'i rdo rje, b. 1697; see chap.14, note 51). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Secret Wrathful Manjushri Tantra ('jam dpal khros pa gsang rgyud). Mahayoga Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section which was received by Manjushrimitra. [ZL] [RY]
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Seed samadhi (rgyu'i ting nge 'dzin). The third of the three samadhis. [RY]
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Seed syllable (yig 'bru). The syllable from which the deity is manifested during the development stage. [RY]
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Seeing the mind essence (sems ngo mthong ba). [RY]
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Self Liberation of the Six Senses (tshogs drug rang grol). Shabkar's name. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Self of phenomena (chos kyi bdag). An independent entity or inherently existent identity in phenomena. [RY]
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Self of phenomena. [RY]
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Self of the individual (gang zag gi bdag). See 'individual self.' [RY]
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Self-aware self-cognizance (rang rig rang gsal). [RY]
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Self-Born Padma, expl. of name of Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]
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Self-born Padma; expl. of name of Padmasambhava [LWx] [RY]
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Self-cognizance (rang rig). [RY]
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Self-cognizant mindfulness (rang gsal gyi dran pa). [RY]
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self-consecration [LWx] [RY]
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self-consecration; relative [LW1] [RY]
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 +
self-empowerments. (bdag 'jug) Literally "Self-Entry". This is an use of the liturgy of the empowerment of a particular deity as a practice. Without the presence of an external lama, one uses all the ritual objects etc., oneself, while internally doing all the visualisations and meditation necessary for receiving the empowerment. In this way, one "enters" into the mandala of that deity. [Peter Roberts]
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self-entity (bdag); expl. of two kinds [LW1] [RY]
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Self-entity (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent entity of the individual self or of phenomena. [RY]
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SELF-ENTITY (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent entity of the individual self or of phenomena.[AL] [RY]
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self-entity; expl. of two kinds [LWx] [RY]
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self-entry. The self-entry, means entering the mandala of liberation of the deity you have been practicing. This is done by using the empowerment text, and receiving the empowerments though one's own practice and visualisation, without an external teacher giving the empowerment. [Peter Roberts]
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Self-existing natural flow (rang byung rang babs). [RY]
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Self-existing self-cognizance (rang byung rang gsal). [RY]
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Self-existing wakefulness (rang byung ye shes). [RY]
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self-existing wakefulness (rang byung ye shes); as emanation basis for all syllables, as synonym for sugata essence [LW1] [RY]
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self-existing wakefulness; as emanation basis for all syllables; as synonym for sugata essence; [LWx] [RY]
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Self-existing wisdom (rang byung ye shes). Basic wakefulness that is independent of intellectual constructs. [ZL] [RY]
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Self-grasping (atma graha, bdag 'dzin). A mind apprehending an independently existent self-nature of a person or of dharmas; the misconception of a truly existing self. [RY]
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Selflessness (bdag med). The innate absence of a self-entity in both the individual person as well as in matter and mind. [RY]
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Selflessness. = Non-self. [RY]
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Self-liberated (rang grol). [RY]
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Self-liberated Direct Seeing that Points Out the Awareness (rig pa ngo sprod cer mthong rang grol). [EMP] [RY]
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self-nature (rang bzhin) [LWx] [RY]
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 +
Self-nature (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent substance of the individual self or of phenomena. Something that can serve as a valid basis for individual attributes. [RY]
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self-nature (rang bzhin). See also emptiness [LW1] [RY]
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SELF-NATURE (rang bzhin). See 'Self-entity.'[AL] [RY]
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self-nature [LWx] [RY]
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Self-occurring (rang shar). [RY]
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Seltong (gsal stong). Luminosity inseparable from emptiness. [RY]
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Sem (sems). When opposed to 'rigpa,' it means the ordinary state of dualistic mind which is ignorant of its own nature and produces karma for further samsaric rebirth. [RY]
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semi-apparent natural nirmanakaya realm; [LWx] [RY]
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semi-apparent nirmanakaya; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Semi-manifest natural nirmanakaya realms of Mahabrahma. [Daki] [RY]
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Semnyi Ngalso. [RY]
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Semo (bse mo). [ZL] [RY]
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Sending and taking (gtong len). See 'giving and taking.' [RY]
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sending and taking. The practice of sending and taking, is the practice of giving away all happiness and good karma to all beings, while taking all their suffering and bad karma into oneself. It is a practice which is done combined with visualisation and one's breathing. [Peter Roberts]
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SENGCHEN NAMTRAK (seng chen nams brag). One of the 25 sacred places of Kham opened by Chokgyur Lingpa. Sengchen Namtrak means 'Great Lion Sky Cliff.'[AL] [RY]
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Sengchen Namtrak. [RY]
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Senge Dongma. [RY]
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Senge Dradrok; one of the eight manifestations [LW1] [RY]
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Senge Dzongphuk (seng ge rdzong phug) [LW1] [RY]
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Senge Wangchuk (lce btsun seng ge dbang phyug)11th-12th century. Chetsün Senge Wangchuk is counted among the lineage gurus in the transmission of Nyingthig which he received from his root guru Dangma Lhungyal as well as from Vimalamitra directly. As a result of his high level of realization, his physical body disappeared in rainbow light at the time of death. Before passing away, he uttered this last song. His later reincarnation as Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo remembered the Dzogchen teachings which Senge Wangchuk had transmitted to the dakini Palgyi Lodrö and wrote them down as the terma Chetsün Nyingthig, one of the most important Dzogchen instructions based on the transmission from Vimalamitra. [RY]
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Senge Yutso. [RY]
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Senmo (bsen mo). [ZL] [RY]
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Senmo (bsen mo). A type of evil spirit often found in company with the gyalpo class and thus are the male and female spirits symbolizing desire and anger. [ZL] [RY]
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Sense bases (skye mched), ayatana. The five senses and their five objects as well as the mental faculty and mental objects. [RY]
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sense bases (skye mched). See aggregates, elements, and sense bases; six sense bases; twelve sense bases [LW1] [RY]
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SENSE BASES (skye mched). The twelve sense factors are the organs of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind consciousness as well as their corresponding objects which are visual form, sound, smell, taste, texture, and mental object.[AL] [RY]
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Sense factors (skye mched). The twelve sense factors are the organs of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind consciousness as well as their corresponding objects which are visual form, sound, smell, taste, texture, and mental object. [RY]
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sense faculties, five (dbang po lnga) [LW1] [RY]
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sense objects (yul); five; six [LW1] [RY]
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sense powers. See sense faculties [LW1] [RY]
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sense-bases; see 'aggregates, elements, and sense-bases'; six; twelve [LWx] [RY]
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Sentient being (sems can). Any living being in one of the six realms who has not attained liberation. [ZL] [RY]
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[[Sentient beings]] (sattva, sems can; also jagat, 'gro (ba)). Any beings who have not yet attained Buddhahood. [RY]
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sentient beings (sems can); definition according to Dzogchen [LW1] [RY]
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Separation or preference (dbye bsri) is synonymous with distant or close (nye ring). [RY]
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Sera monastery. [RY]
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Serak (bse rag). A type of mischievous spirit who consumes the potent essences of food and wealth. He personifies ultimate envy and miserliness and is usually exorcized during rituals to promote wealth and prosperity. [ZL] [RY]
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Seralung used to house up to one hundred monks, tradionally a monastery of the Drigung Kagyu order it was totally destroyed by the Chinese and the small newly built temple is now run by Gelukpa monks. Nearby on the shore of the lake on finds the five-colored sands. Trugo Monastery and Yer-ngo Monastery (in ruins) are places where Atisha spent some time in meditation. Trugo is also a market place to which many nomads converge. Chiu Monastery, on a hill where Guru Rinpoche spent his last seven days in Tibet (?) [MR]
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serenity (snyoms 'jug) conceptionless serenity [LW1] [RY]
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SERENITY OF CESSATION ('gog pa'i snyoms 'jug). The meditative state entered by an arhant after all disturbing emotions, sensations and thinking have ceased. It is not considered the ultimate goal by the Mahayana schools.[AL] [RY]
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serenity of cessation [LWx] [RY]
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serenity of the sphere of infinite consciousness; expl. [LW1] [RY]
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serenity of the sphere of infinite space; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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serenity of the sphere of neither absence of conception nor presence of conception; expl. [LW1] [RY]
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serenity of the sphere of nothing whatsoever; expl. [LW1] [RY]
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serenity of the sphere of nothing whatsoever; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Serkyem (gser skyems). Oblation, libation, drink, offering; sacrificial pouring of a liquid or the liquid thus poured; [RY]
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Serling (gser gling). [ZL] [RY]
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Session {thun}. A fixed period of meditation practice. [RY]
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sevasadhana. Sevasadhana.: Tibetan: bsnyen sgrub. While the Sanskrit word sadhana can have as many as thirty-four different meanings, the meaning here of course is the practice of a Tantric deity as "a means of accomplishment". The word "Seva" also has a range of meanings, its root being to serve and attend, but also meaning to honour and worship, to be devoted or even addicted to, to practice and employ, to follow, to cultivate, practice, to frequent and inhabit. The Tibetan part of this word: bsnyen, can mean both to honour or worship, and to approach or be near to, and is usually transalted as "approach". However, the basic meaning of this whole word, is to practice something assiduously and intensively, or to do something repeatedly. A Tibetan definition, is "to be closely associated with a deity". Thrangu Rinpoche says that sevasadhana means an intensive practice of a deity, but not necessarily within a retreat context, although it is a retreat form of practice that will be described in this text. He also states that it does not specifically mean the repeated accumulation of specific numbers of mantras, another principal characteristic of the practice. [Peter Roberts]
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sevasadhana. Sevasadhana.: Tibetan: bsnyen sgrub. While the Sanskrit word sadhana can have as many as thirty-four different meanings, the meaning here of course is the practice of a Tantric deity as "a means of accomplishment". The word "Seva" also has a range of meanings, its root being to serve and attend, but also meaning to honour and worship, to be devoted or even addicted to, to practice and employ, to follow, to cultivate, practice, to frequent and inhabit. The Tibetan part of this word: bsnyen, can mean both to honour or worship, and to approach or be near to. However, the basic meaning of this whole word, is to practice something assiduously and intensively, or to do something repeatedly. A Tibetan definition, is "to be closely associated with a deity". Thrangu Rinpoche says that sevasadhana means an intensive practice of a deity, but not necessarily within a retreat context, although it is a retreat form of practice that will be described in this text. He also states that it does not specifically mean the repeated accumulation of specific numbers of mantras, another principal characteristic of the practice. Although Rinpoche said that "intensive-practice" would be a suitable translation, it proved rather awkward, due to its repeated use in the text. As sadhana is already a familiar term, I have used the Sanskrit for this important word throughout the text. [Peter Roberts]
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Seven aspects of union (kha sbyor yan lag bdun). The seven qualities of a sambhogakaya buddha: complete enjoyment, union, great bliss, absence of a self-nature, presence of compassion, being uninterrupted, and being unceasing. [ZL] [RY]
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seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun) [LWx] [RY]
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seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun). Samadhi, full discernment of phenomena, mindfulness, diligence, rejoicing/joy, pliancy, and impartiality. [E] [RY]
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seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]
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seven bodhi-factors; listing of [LWx] [RY]
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seven branch prayer a number of times. The seven branch prayer, is a prayer of homage, offering, confession, rejoicing in the good actions of others, requesting the Dharma-wheel to be turned, a supplication to not pass away into the parinirvana, and a dedication of one's good karma. [Peter Roberts]
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seven branch prayer. The original terma text: Rigdzin Jatson Nyingpo's terma are in six volumes, the Köncho Chidu, or Ratnasamanyasamgha texts form the first volume. The various practices are in the form of short texts, that have to be combined in one's practice. Jamgön Kongtrül is here describing a practice being done in relation to these texts. Later, he compiled a sadhana and a preliminary text from this, which is what is now generally used. In his version of the sadhana, the seven-line prayer does not, as in the original text, follow the refuge and bodhicitta verse, instead Vajrasattva does. and the seven-line prayer is inserted into the mandala-offering section. In the detailed preliminary text, the line of refuge is contained within a specially written section, as are the three lines of the bodhicitta. A Vajrasattva practice then follows, and this seven-branch prayer opens the mandala-section. [Peter Roberts]
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seven branches (yan lag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Seven branches (yan lag bdun pa). The seven branch practice of prostrating to the Three Jewels, confessing negative actions, making offering, rejoicing in the virtue of others, requesting to turn the wheel of Dharma, beseeching to not pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit to the enlightenment of all sentient beings. [RY]
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seven branches (yan lag bdun pa); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Seven Chapters {le'u bdun ma}. A famous supplication to Padmasambhava in seven songs revealed by terton Zangpo Tragpa, 14th century. [RY]
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Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun) [RY]
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Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]
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seven collections [LWx] [RY]
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seven collections of consciousness (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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Seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [RY]
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seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LWx] [RY]
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Seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [RY]
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seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LWx] [RY]
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Seven golden mountains (gser ri bdun). According to the cosmology of the Abhidharma, seven circles of mountains surrounding Mount Sumeru in the center of our universe. [ZL] [RY]
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Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LWx] [RY]
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Seven kinds of vows of the pratimoksha (so so thar pa'i ris bdun). Seven sets of vows for ordained monks and nuns, novices and lay people. See 'Individual Liberation.' [RY]
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Seven Line Prayer. [RY]
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Seven Line Supplication (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). [ZL] [RY]
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SEVEN LINE SUPPLICATION (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). The famous supplication to Padmasambhava beginning with "On the northwest border of the country of Uddiyana, …"[AL] [RY]
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Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun), [RY]
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Seven noble riches ('phags pa'i nor bdun) The richness of faith, discipline, diligence, modesty, learning, generosity and intelligence. [RY]
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seven noble riches or qualities ('phags pa'i nor bdun). Faith, discipline, generosity, learning, a sense of moral shame in front of others, a sense of ethical conscience in regard to oneself, and intelligence. One also speaks of faith, which is like a river; discipline, which is like a flower; generosity, which is like a jewel; learning, which is like an ocean; samaya, which is like a crystal; a sense of moral shame, which is undeceiving like one's own parents; and wisdom, which is like the sun. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Seven Patriarchs - Early leader of the Sangha in the time after the Buddha. Some traditions recognize eight or more patriarchs. [RY]
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Seven points of meditation posture (rnam snang chos bdun). The legs in crosslegged position, the spine straight, the shoulders extended, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose. [RY]
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Seven points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma) written by Geshe Chen-ngawa (spyan snga ba, also known as tshul khrims 'bar, 1038-1103) according to the oral instructions on loving-kindness, compassion, and Bodhicitta that he had received from Drom Tönpa ('brom ston pa, 1005-64), the chief disciple of Atisha (982-1054). The latter had received these instructions from the great Bodhicitta master Serlingpa. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Seven Points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma); listing of; quotation from [LWx] [RY]
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Seven postures of Vairochana {snam snang chos bdun}. Seven postures adopted during meditation. [RY]
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Seven precious substances (rin chen bdun). Ruby, sapphire, lapis, emerald, diamond, pearl and coral. Sometimes the list includes gold, silver, and crystal. [ZL] [RY]
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Seven Profound Cycles (zab pa skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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Seven Profound Cycles; [LWx] [RY]
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Seven pure aspects (bdun rnam dag). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]
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Seven purities (dag pa bdun). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]
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Seven qualities of a high rebirth (mtho ris yon tan bdun): noble family, beautiful bodily form, long life-span, no illness, good fortune, abundant wealth, and great intelligence. [RY]
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seven royal emblems are the precious wheel, the precious jewel, the precious queen, the precious elephant, the precious minister, the precious horse, and the precious general. Here, Tashi Dedenpa is endowed with the seven noble riches (see chap.5, note 13). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Seven royal possessions (rgyal srid sna bdun). The precious wheel, jewel, minister, horse, elephant, queen, and general. [RY]
 +
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Seven Sections of Abhidharma (mngon pa sde bdun); expl. [LWx] [RY]
 +
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Seven Sections of Accomplishment (grub pa sde bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]
 +
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seven special qualities of Mantrayana; listing of [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
Seven thought states resulting from delusion (gti mug las byung ba'i rtog pa bdun). See list under 'eighty inherent thought states' (rang bzhin brgyad cu'i rtog pa) [RY]
 +
 +
Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun) are: 1) Oral tradition (bka' ma) the early translated tripitaka and tantras passed on unbrokenly from master to disciple; 2) Earth Treasure (sa gter), revealed by the tertön; 3) Rediscovered Treasure (yang gter), revealed for the second time from an past treasure; 4) Mind Treasure (dgongs gter), revealed from the mind of the guru; 5) Hearing Lineage (snyan brgyud), received directly from an enlightened being; 6) Pure Vision (dag snang), received in a pure experience; and 7) Recollection (rjes dran), remembrance from a former life. [RY]
 +
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Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun): canonical lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage. [RY]
 +
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Seven Transmissions (bka' babs bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]
 +
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Seven Treasures {mdzod bdun}. A writing in seven volumes by Longchen Rabjam. It covers all aspects of the Buddhist teachings and in particular all the subtleties of the Great Perfection. [RY]
 +
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Seven Treasuries (mdzod bdun), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Seven Treasuries, (mdzod bdun) and the Three Great Chariots (ngal so skor gsum), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
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Seven Treatises on Logic; [Pramanavarttika-karika and six other important texts]; (tshad ma sde bdun); Dharmakirti, 7th century. [PK] [RY]
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seven types of attention (yid byed bdun); detailed expl.; listing of [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
seven types of Individual Liberation (so thar ris bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]
 +
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Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun) are: 1) In the context of the ground, emptiness is uncuttable by the klesha obscuration and 2) indestructible by the conceptual obscuration. 3) In the context of the path, its essence is true, 4) its nature is solid and 5) its function is stable. 6) In the context of the fruition, it is unattached to the klesha obscuration and 7) undefeatable or unobstructed by the conceptual obscuration. [RY]
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Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Emptiness externally is 1) solid, firm, and unbreakable, internally 2) the core and 3) without hollowness, 4) not cutable into pieces, 5) not possibly split asunder or destroyed, 6) impossible to burn and 7) finally imperishable, it is therefore described as the vajra of emptiness. These seven vajra qualities, such as being uncuttable and indestructible, etc. are according to Jamdrak. [RY]
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Seven Vajra Qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Incorruptibility [sra ba] is one of seven so-called vajra attributes [rdo rje'i chos bdun] of the abiding nature of reality. The other attributes are invulnerability [mi chod pa], indestructibility [mi shigs pa], authenticity [bden pa], stability [brtan pa], unobstructibility [thogs pa med pa], and invincibility [ma pham pa]. See Buddhahood Without Meditation, Richard Barron, trans. [Padma Publishing, 1994], pp. 33-34. [RY]
 +
 +
seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); another listing of; listing of [LWx] [RY]
 +
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seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]
 +
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SEVEN WAYS OF TRANSMISSION (bka' babs bdun). Canonical or oral lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage.[AL] [RY]
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Seven Wheels of Kshitigarbha Sutra (sa snying 'khor lo bdun gyi mdo). [RY]
 +
 +
seven-branch prayer (yan lag bdun pa). 1) Prostration as an antidote to pride, 2) offering as an antidote to miserliness, 3) confession and repentance as an antidote to the three poisons, 4) joy at others' happiness and virtues as an antidote to jealousy, 5) the request that the Wheel of Dharma be turned as a purification for having abandoned the Dharma in the past, 6) the prayer that the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and spiritual masters remain in this world as a purification for having upset one's teacher, and 7) dedication of merit as an antidote to wrong views. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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 +
sevenfold greatness (chen po bdun); of Mahayana, listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Sevenfold Pointing-out Instruction (ngo sprod bdun pa). [EMP] [RY]
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 +
Sevenfold posture of Vairochana (rnam snang chos bdun). See (‘seven-point posture…’) - This positon is described as the legs in full lotus, the spine straight, the shoulders broadened, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose.[EMP] [RY]
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SEVENFOLD PURITY (dag pa bdun). Same as the seven branches: Prostrating, making offerings, confessing, rejoicing, requesting to turn the Wheel of the Dharma, beseeching not to pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit for the welfare of all beings.[AL] [RY]
 +
 +
seven-point posture of vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana, the so-called "lotus posture," the right foot over the left thigh. 2) The hands closed into fists, and with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows are then locked straight. (One variation of this is to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides; another is to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight and erect, "like a pile of golden coins." 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking and unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p. 41.  [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
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Seven-point Posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). A certain meditation posture to be learned through oral instructions. [RY]
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 +
seven-point posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left. 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins. 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking, unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p.41-2. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Seven-point posture of Vairocana; (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left., 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees.), 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward., 4) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins.", 5) The chin should be tucked in slightly towards the throat., 6) The tip of the tongue should be curled up to touch the palate., 7) The eyes should be kept unwaveringly focused at a distance of l2 fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose, without blinking. [MR]
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Seven-rebirth pills (skye bdun ril bu) are prepared from sacred substances including originally, it is said, the flesh of a person reborn seven successive lifetimes as a brahmin. The mere taste of these is said to shut the doors of rebirth in the lower realms of samsara. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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seventeen abodes of the Realm of Form (gzugs khams gnas ris bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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Seventeen abodes of the Realms of Form (gzugs khams kyi gnas ris bcu bdun). The four Dhyana Realms of three each plus the five Pure Abodes. For details, see Mipham Rinpoche's Gateway to Knowledge. [RY]
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Seventeen Dzogchen Tantras (rdzogs chen gyi rgyud bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]
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Seventeen tantras {rgyud bcu bdun}. The tantras of the extremely profound innermost unsurpassed cycle of pith instructions of Atiyoga. [RY]
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Seventy Admonitions, lit. the Seventy Verses ending with "Ang" (ang yig bdun bcu pa), is spiritual advice by Karak Gomchung that condenses the essence of the Kadampa teachings.  [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Seventy Verses on Emptiness; Shunyatasaptati-karika; (stong nyid bdun cu pa); Nagarjuna, 1st-2nd century. [PK] [RY]
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seventy-two Palgöns [LW1] [RY]
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Sey, Chak and Dung (bse lcags dung). [ZL] [RY]
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Seyna-lek Jing-yön (sad na legs 'jing yon). [ZL] [RY]
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sgeg pa rdo rje - wo1 253 life story [RY]
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sgrub sde - Mahayoga wo1 258- [RY]
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sgyud sde - Mahayoga wo1 -258 [RY]
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sha gzan, a fully grown sheep (i.e., at least three years old). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal : 1594-1651 [MR]
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Shabdrung Rinpoche. See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]
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Shabdrung Rinpoche; another name of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; [LWx] [RY]
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Shabkar - In his History of the Great Monastery of Rongpo (RO, p.646), Jigme Thekcho speaks of twenty-two major works of Shabkar: nine "Emanated Scriptures" (sprul pa'i glegs bam), three "Excellent Discourses" (legs bshad), three "Dharma Discourses" (chos bshad), three "Songs on the View" (lta mgur), and four "Autobiographical Songs" (rnam mgur). However, he does not identify them individually. The nine "Emanated Scriptures" have been reviewed above. The three "Excellent Discourses" are The Self-arising Sun (legs bshad nyi ma rang shar), The Golden Scalpel (legs bshad gser gyi thur ma), and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (legs bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). In his autobiography, Shabkar mentions four, not three, "Dharma Discourses": The Beneficial Sun (chos bshad gzhan phan nyi ma), The Beneficial Moon (chos bshad gzhan phan zla ba), The Beneficial Jewel (chos bshad gzhan phan nor bu) and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (chos bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). The three "Songs on the View" may correspond to the trilogy of The Flight of the Garuda. The identification of the four "Autobiographical Songs" is also unclear, although here and there in the autobiography Shabkar offers summaries of his life (for example, in chapters 11 and 15). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shabkar (zhabs dkar). Literally, 'White Feet.' The name of Tsogdruk Rangdrol given to him because wherever he placed his feet the area became 'white' or virtuous. [RY]
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Shabkar Tsogdruk Rangdrol (zhabs dkar tshogs drug rang grol): 1781-1851 [MR]
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Shaci (legs brjod ma). (bde sogs), 'Divine Power', wife of shakra or Indra. [RY]
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Shailendra - Dynasty of Buddhist kings, originally from Java, who took control of Shrivijaya [RY]
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Shaking Samsara From Its Depths ('khor ba sdong sprugs). [ZL] [RY]
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Shakputri (shak pu tri). The son of King Jah and lineage holder of both Mahayoga and Anu Yoga. He is also known as Indrabhuti the Younger and Master Lawapa. [ZL] [RY]
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Shakra (brgya byin). Ruler of the gods of the lower heavens of the Desire Realm, who dwells in the immense Vaijayanta palace on the summit of Mount Meru. Sometimes referred to as Indra. [RY]
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Shakti. Divine energy or power, personified as female in Hindu Tantra. The term is never used for female deities in Buddhist Tantra, and would for most of them be inappropriate, though Tara might be a exception. [RY]
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Shakya - the clan into which the Buddha was born; their lands in northern India bordered on Nepal. The Shakyas were destroyed by neighboring peoples during the Buddha's lifetime. [RY]
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Shakya (sha kya). The name of the family clan into which Buddha Shakyamuni was born. practitioners are often given Shakya as a part of their Buddhist name. [ZL] [RY]
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Shakya Devi, the daughter of a Nepalese King. [Daki] [RY]
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Shakya Prava [LW1] [RY]
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Shakya Senge (sha kya seng ge). One of the eight manifestations of Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]
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Shakya Senge; [LWx] [RY]
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Shakya Senge; one of the eight manifestations [LW1] [RY]
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Shakya Shri (sha kya shr'i.). A Tibetan mahasiddha of the 19th century belong chiefly to the
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Drukpa Kagyu lineage. [RY]
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Shakya Shri: 1127 or 45-1225 [MR]
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Shakya Shri: 1127-1225. A great pandita. [RY]
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Shakyabodhi (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]
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Shakyadevi (sha kya de wi). The daughter of the Nepalese king Punyedhara. She is one of the five chief female disciples of Padmasambhava. Since her mother died during her birth, she was abandoned in a charnel ground and brought up by monkeys. Having been accepted as Padmasambhava's worthy companion, she was his consort for the practice of the nine divinities of Vishuddha in the Cave of Yanglesh" where they displayed the manner of achieving the vidyadhara level of mahamudra. Shakyadevi attained the accomplishment of the female buddha Mamaki and finally achieved the indestructible rainbow body. [ZL] [RY]
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Shakyamuni (sha kya thub pa). 'The Sage of the Shakyas,' Buddha Shakyamuni, our historical buddha. [ZL] [RY]
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Shakyamuni Buddha - () The sage of the Shakyas; the historical Buddha, born in Kapilvastu; the fourth Buddha of the Bhadrakalpa and seventh Buddha of the present era [RY]
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Shakyaprabha; (sha kya 'od) Born in Kashmir, he was a disciple of Punyakirti and Shatiprabha. He wrote several treatises on Vinaya. [MR]
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Shakyas - The people of the small republican kingdom north of Magadha where the Buddha was born [RY]
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Shalmali of Iron (lcags kyi shal ma li). [ZL] [RY]
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Shalu Ridugpa Losel Tenkyong: 1804 [MR]
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Shamanism (bon 'gyer). In this book the term has the negative connotation of rituals performed for selfish or superficial mundane aims. [ZL] [RY]
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Shamar Chen-ngawa Chökyi Trakpa (zhwa dmar spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa, 1453-1524), the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa. Born in Kangmar in Domey, he became a disciple of the seventh Karmapa Chötrak Gyatso (karma pa chos grags rgya mtsho, 1450-1506). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shamar Konchok Yanlag (1525-1583) was the fifth bearer of the Shamar crown and the disciple and lineage holder of the eighth Karmapa, Mikyo Dorje. [RY]
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Shamar Trisur Garwang Gyatso (zhwa dmar khri zur gar dbang rgya mtsho). See GC, vol. 4, pp. 133-7. Wondrous signs indicated that he was the reincarnation of the eighth Shamar, Palchen Chökyi Dondrup (1695-1732), and he was enthroned at Yangpachen. However, when another reincarnation was recognized, he left the throne and remained at Namseling (rnam sras gling); hence his title of "retired" Shamar (zur pa). His main teacher was Gampo Kunzang Ngedön Wangpo (sgam po kun bzang nges don dbang po). He displayed a vast activity for the benefit of the Dharma and sentient beings, and lived fifty-eight years. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shamar: IV Chökyi Dragpa; 1453-1524, (spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa);, the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa, born in Kangmar in Domey. He became disciple of the Seventh Karmapa: VII Chötrag Gyatso; (ka rma pa chos grags rgya mthso;, 1450-1506). [MR]
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SHAMATHA (zhi gnas) 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought.[AL] [RY]
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Shamatha (zhi gnas). 'Calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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shamatha (zhi gnas). See also nine means of mental stillness; and vipashyana; literal meaning; obstacles for the cultivation of; of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness [LW1] [RY]
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Shamatha (zhi gnas). Stillness, literally 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided. It can also mean the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas) is the practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med) is the act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and Dzogchen and should not be mistaken for 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö.[Primer] [RY]
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shamatha and vipashyana [LWx] [RY]
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Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). [RY]
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Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Vajrayana practice, this term is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of enlightenment. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]
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shamatha of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness; [LWx] [RY]
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Shamatha state of cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Mahayana or Vajrayana practice, this state is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of the enlightenment of the buddhas. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]
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Shamatha that delights the tathagatas (de bzhin gshegs dgyes/ dge'i zhi gnas). The shamatha state at the first bhumi which is embraced with insight into emptiness. [RY]
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Shamatha with attributes (mtshan bcas zhi gnas). [RY]
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Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas). The practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. [RY]
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Shamatha without attributes (mtshan med zhi gnas). [RY]
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Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med). The act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and should not be mistaken for being 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö. [RY]
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shamatha; obstacles for the cultivation of [LWx] [RY]
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Shanavasika - Disciple of Ananda; the third patriarch [RY]
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Shang [LW1] [RY]
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Shang Rinpoche (shangs): 1353- [MR] 1123-1193? [RY]
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Shang Rinpoche, Yudrak Gonpo, see chap.9, note 59. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shang Ton (shangs ston)?: 1309- [MR]
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Shangpa / The shangs pa teachings were based on the lineage brought to Tibet by the siddha Khyung po rnal 'byor (11th century?), a great tantric master who has studied with many teachers, including dakinis. Khyung po lived in Shangs in gTsang, central Tibet, where six disciples became his spiritual sons. Thus, this school is sometimes known as the Seven Treasures lineage (the Master and his six sons) or as the Dakini lineage. The teachings of this school, which are powerful and practice-oriented, have been assimilated into the other schools, particularly the bKa' rgyud and dGe lugs schools. [RY]
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Shangpa Kagyü [LW1] [RY]
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shangshang [LW1] [RY]
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Shangshung (zhang zhung). [ZL] [RY]
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Shangtong Tashi Dorje (zhong ston bkra shis rdo rje): 1097-1167 [MR]
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Shantarakshita - Abbot of Vikramashila who ordained the first Tibetan monks; founder of philosophical school synthesizing [[Madhyamaka]] and Yogachara [RY]
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Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho) means Peace Sustainer. [RY]
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Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho), abbot of Samye [LW1] [RY]
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Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho). 'Guardian of Peace.' The Indian pandita and abbot of Vikramashila and of Samye who ordained the first Tibetan monks. He was an incarnation of the bodhisattva Vajrapani and is also known as Khenpo Bodhisattva or Bhikshu Bodhisattva Shantarakshita. He is the founder of philosophical school combining [[Madhyamaka]] and Yogachara. This tradition was reestablished and clarified by Mipham Rinpoche in his commentary on the [[Madhyamaka]] Lamkara. [ZL] [RY]
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Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho). The Indian pandita and abbot of Samye who ordained the first Tibetan monks. [RY]
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Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho); expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Shantarakshita. He was an incarnation of the bodhisattva Vajrapani who dwells on the bhumis and is known as the Bhikshu Bodhisattva Shantarakshita (dge slong byang chub sems dpa' zhi ba 'tsho). [RY]
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Shantarakshita; [LWx] [RY]
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Shantideva - Seventh century master at nalanda, one of the 84 Siddhas; author of the Bodhicharyavatara [RY]
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Shantideva (zhi ba lha). A great learned and realized Indian master. [RY]
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Shantideva (zhi ba lha). The great Indian master and scholar; author of the Bodhicharyavatara. [RY]
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Shantideva (zhi ba lha); quotation by [LWx] [RY]
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Shantideva (zhi ba lha, 685-763) was one of the eighty-four mahasiddhas of India. He composed the famous Bodhicaryavatara (byang chub sems dpa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa, T 3871), Engaging in the Bodhisattva's Activity, from which the verse quoted here is extracted. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shantideva {zhi ba lha}. Indian mahasiddha and scholar at Nalanda university during the first half of the 8th century. He astounded the monks of Nalanda with his famous poem on bodhicitta, the Bodhicaryavatara {byang chub sems pa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa}. He was one of the eightyfour mahasiddhas of India. [RY]
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Shantigarbha (zhi ba'i snying po) [LW1] [RY]
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Shantigarbha (zhi ba'i snying po); mention of [LWx] [RY]
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Shariputra - One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom [RY]
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Shariputra (sha ri'i bu). One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Shariputra [LW1] [RY]
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Sharmapa Chökyi Wangchuk (zhva dmar pa chos kyi dbang phyug). 1584-c.1635. The sixth master in the line of Sharmapa incarnations. [RY]
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sharp-pointed red torma (dmar gtor rtse rno), [RY]
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Shasa Horma (sha za hor ma). According to Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche this is the same as Shasa Khamoche (sha za kha mo che), a wrathful female wisdom protector who was entrusted by Guru Padmasambhava at Samye Chimphu to guard the Nyingma teachings in general and the Lama Gondu (bla ma dgongs 'dus) cycle in particular (a terma rediscovered by Sangye Lingpa, 1340-1396). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shastras {bstan chos}. Commentaries specifically illustrating the meaning of the Buddha's teachings. The three qualifications for composing shastras are perfect realization, a vision of the yidam deity and complete knowledge of the five sciences. [RY]
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Shavaripa (sha ba ri pa). A great Indian master and the guru of Saraha. [RY]
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Shawopa, or Shawo Gangpa;, (sha bo sgang pa), 1067-1131, a disciple of Langri Tangpa;, (glang ri thang pa) and of the Three Brothers -- Putowa;, (pu to ba), Chengnawa;, (spyan snga ba), and Puchungwa; (phu chung ba)--the three main disciples of Dromtönpa;, ('brom ston pa). [MR]
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Shechen Gyaltsap Rinpoche, Gyurme Pema Namgyal, (zhe chen rgyal tshab 'gyur med pad ma rnam rgyal) [MR]
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Shechen Kongtrül Pema Drime (zhe chen kong sprul pad ma dri med): 1901-1960 [MR]
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Shechen Ongtrul Gyurme Tuthob Namgyal (zhe chen dbon sprul 'gyur med mthu stobs rnam rgyal):1787- [MR]
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Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]
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Shechen Rabjam: 1910-195? [MR]
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Shechen, Monastery [LW1] [RY]
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Sheja Kunkhyab Treasury (shes bya kun khyab mdzod). One of the Five Treasuries of Jamgön Kongtrül containing an encyclopedia of Buddhism and Buddhist culture in three volumes. At present, it is being translated under the guidance of H.E. Kalu Rinpoche. [RY]
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Sheldam Nyingjang (zhal gdams snying byang) is the basic root text and the first volume of the Barchey Künsel cycle revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sheldam Nyingjang (zhal gdams snying byang), root tantra of Barchey Künsel [LW1] [RY]
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Sheldam Nyingjang Yishin Norbu (zhal gdams snying byang yid bzhin nor bu). The Wish-fulfilling Jewel Essence Manual of Oral Instruction, the major text among the collection of treasures belonging to Lamey Tukdrub Barchey Künsel. It is the first volume in the New Delhi edition of the New Treasures of Chokgyur Lingpa (mchog gling gter gsar). [RY]
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Sheldam Nyingjang; quotation from; root tantra of Barchey Künsel [LWx] [RY]
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Sheldrak Phuk (shel brag phug) [LW1] [RY]
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Shelkar Chöde; (shel dkar chos sde) A monastery founded by a Sakya Lama, Sindeu Rinchen, who then turned to the Geluk order. [MR]
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Shelkar Chödeh (shel dkar chos sde) is located near Shelkar Dzong (shel dkar rdzong), the provincial capital of Tingri, which marks the limit between the provinces of Tsang (gtsang) and Lato (stod). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shelkar Dzong; (shel dkar rdzong) The Whitle Crystal Castle /Fortress, was the provincial capital for the Tingri area. [MR]
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Shenpa Pekar (bshan pa pe kar). [ZL] [RY]
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Shenpa. [RY]
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Shenrab / (gshen rab) - according to the Bon tradition, the founder of the Bon religion. [RY]
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Shentong (gzhan stong). An aspect of the [[Madhyamaka]] School in Tibet focusing on emptiness indivisible from luminosity, asserting that the kayas and wisdoms of buddhahood are naturally present within the sugata essence. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Shentrul Wangje (gzhan 'phrul dbang byed) One of the abodes of gods in the Realm of Desire. [RY]
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Shijey (Pacifying) (zhi byed) [LW1] [RY]
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Shijey (zhi byed). Pacifying, one of the Eight Practice Lineages brought to Tibet by Phadampa Sangye. [RY]
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Shijey / The Zhi byed teachings were brought to Tibet by Dam pa sang rgyas, a siddha who visited Tibet several times around the 12th century and introduced the gCod teachings. His disciple, sKyo ston bSod nams bla ma, founded the Father lineage of gCod which followed the Sutrayana teachings according to Aryadeva; Ma gcig Slab sgron, a great female siddha, founded the Mother lineage, based on Prajnaparamita. Zhi byed emphasizes teachings suited to the individual's consciousness rather than adhering to specific texts. gCod teachings continue within other schools, especially rNying ma and bKa' rgyud. [RY]
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Shijey / Zhi byed - see Tantra [RY]
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Shin (gshin). A type of spirit; either the yama type or simply consciousness of a human who has passed away but is still lingering in the bardo state. [ZL] [RY]
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Shin Arahan - Young monk from Thaton responsible for converting King Anoratha of Pagan [RY]
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Shingon - Japanese school of Tantra, based on Yoga Tantras as taught in the Chinese tradition; emphasizes practice relating to Vairocana Buddha [RY]
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Shingsa Pandita Lobzang Dargye (shing bza' pandita blo bzang dar rgyas, 1753-1824). He became the second abbot of Ragya monastery, succeeding its founder, Arik Geshe. He was considered to be the incarnation of, among others, the Kashmir pandita Sakya Sri and Tsongkhapa's mother, Shingsa Achö, (shing bza' a chos). See Jigme Gyaltsen, p. 11, and AC, vol.2, p.139. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shining Jewel Tantra (rin po che 'bar ba'i rgyud). One of The Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Shining Turquoise Temple [LW1] [RY]
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Shinje Tsedak. [RY]
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Shinran - Disciple of Honen; founder of the Japanese Jodoshinshu Pure Land School [RY]
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Shintam Garbha (zhi ba'i snying po). One of the Eight Vidyadharas, receiver of the transmission of Maledictory Fierce Mantra. Born in Uddiyana and reputed to have visited Tibet and participated in the consecration of the Samye Temple. [ZL] [RY]
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Shloka (shlo ka). A stanza, esp. One of four eight-syllable padas; as a unit of length of prose, 32 syllables. [RY]
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Shomu - Eight century Japanese emperor and patron of the Dharma [RY]
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Short History of Dorje Drag; (rdo rje brag) Monastery: bod yul gangs can gyi ljong su snga 'gyur bka' gter gyi chos brgyud 'dzin pa'i gdan sa chen po thub bstan rdo rje brag E wam lcog sgar ba'i chos brgyud dang gdan rabs bcas kyi lo rgyus mdor bsdus) by Taklung Tsetrul Rinpoche [MR]
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Short Indirect Meditation Tantra (bsam gtan brgyud pa'i mdo rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Short lineage of Terma (nye brgyud gter ma). The Dharma treasures concealed chiefly by Guru Rinpoche to be discovered in the future by a tertön, a treasure revealer. [RY]
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Short Notes; (zin bris chung). [PK] [RY]
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Short Truth of the Middle Way (dbu ma bden chung); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
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Shotoku - Sixth century japanese prince and regent who helped establish the Dharma; built important temples and wrote Buddhist commentaries [RY]
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SHRAMANA (dge sbyong). A spiritual practitioner. Often has the connotation of an ascetic or mendicant monk.[AL] [RY]
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Shramanera, (dge tshul). Novice, a lesser number of vows taken prior to the full ordination of a monk.[Primer] [RY]
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Shravaka (Nyan thos) lit. 'Hearer'; one who listens to the teachings of the Buddha, realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering emotionality, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhants. The vehicle of the Shravaka is known as the Shravakayana. [RY]
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Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.' [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY]
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Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths. [RY]
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SHRAVAKA (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.' [AL] [RY]
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Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer, Disciple (of a Buddha)'. A Hinayana Arhant who attains Nirvana under the guidance of a teacher; or someone practicing to become such an Arhant, a Hinayanist. [RY]
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shravaka (nyan thos); as noble Sangha; compared to pratyekabuddha School; enlightenment; general accomplishments; relation to Mahayana; Three Jewels; Vaibhashika School; vehicle; vehicle (nyan thos kyi theg pa); vehicle as First Dharma Wheel [LW1] [RY]
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Shravaka Collection [LWx] [RY]
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Shravaka Collections (nyan thos kyi sde snod) [LW1] [RY]
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shravaka. 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.'[Primer] [RY]
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Shravakas {nyan thos}. Lit. listeners. [RY]
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Shravaka's samadhi of peace (nyan thos kyi zhi ba'i ting nge 'dzin). [RY]
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Shri (dpal ldan). 'Glorious, splendorous.' A title given to many masters, and placed in front of their names. [RY]
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Shri (dpal). 'Glorious, holy', a respectful title. [RY]
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Shri Dipam (dpal sgron). The daughter of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Shri Guhyagarbha (dpal gsang ba snying po). An important Nyingma tantra. [RY]
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SHRI GUHYASAMAJA (dpal gsang ba 'dus pa). Literally, 'Assembly of Secrets.' One of the major tantras and yidams of the New School.[AL] [RY]
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Shri Heruka (dpal chen he ru ka). The wrathful form of Buddha Vairocana. [RY]
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Shri Ratna of Bal [LW1] [RY]
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Shri Singha (shr'i sing ha). The chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied with the masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Shri Singha (Skt). One of the masters in the lineage of mahasandhi or Dzogchen who was a disciple of Manjushrimitra and also the root guru of Padmasambhava. [RY]
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SHRI SINGHA (Skt). The chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied with the masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [AL] [RY]
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Shri Singha / Shri Singha - Vidyadhara, born in Khotan and active in China; important in the Vajrayana transmission lineage [RY]
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Shri Singha [LW1] [RY]
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Shri Singha 1. (Skt). Shri Singha was the chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the Chinese city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied at first with the Chinese masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. In his Ocean of Wondrous Sayings, Guru Tashi Tobgyal adds that Shri Singha received a prophesy from Avalokiteshvara while traveling to Serling, telling him to go to the Sosaling charnel ground in order to be sure of the ultimate attainment. After many years Shri Singha met Manjushrimitra in the charnel ground of Sosaling, and remained with him for twenty-five years. Having transmitted all the oral instructions, the great master Manjushrimitra dissolved his bodily form into a mass of light. When Shri Singha cried out in despair and uttered songs of deep yearning, Manjushrimitra appeared again and bestowed him a tiny casket of precious substance. The casket contained his master's final words, a vital instruction named Gomnyam Drugpa, the Six Experiences of Meditation. Having received this transmission, Shri Singha reached ultimate confidence. In Bodhgaya he found the manuscripts of the tantras previously hidden by Manjushrimitra which he took to China where he classified the Instruction Section into four parts: the outer, inner, secret, and the innermost unexcelled sections. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Shri Singha The chief disciple of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the Chinese city of Shokyam and studied with the Chinese masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Later he met Manjushrimitra in the charnel ground of Sosaling, and remained with him for 25 years. Among his chief disciples were Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [RY]
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Shri Singha, the great vidyadhara who conferred upon Guru Rinpoche the empowerment of the "Manifestation of Awareness" (rig pa'i rtsal dbang). See chap.4, note 16. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Shri Singha; mention of [LWx] [RY]
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Shri Vajrasattva (dpal ldan rdo rje sems dpa'). [RY]
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Shrine mandala (rten gyi man dal). The mandala plate placed on the shrine during offerings. [RY]
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Shrivijaya - Buddhist kingdom founded in Sumatra that spread throughout Indonesia and onto Malay Peninsula [RY]
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Shubhakarasimha - Eight century tantric master in China [RY]
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Shuddhodhana - King of the Shakyas; father of Shakyamuni Buddha [RY]
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Shudra caste (dmangs rigs). The menial classes. [RY]
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Shuksep Jetsün Rigdzin Chönyi Sangmo (shug gseb rje btsun cho nyid bzang mo): 1841-1940 [MR]
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Shula Dragmo (shul la brag mo). [ZL] [RY]
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Shun-tao - Chinese monk who introduced Dharma to Korea in fourth century [RY]
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Shun-tao - Chinese monk who introduced Dharma to Korea in fourth century. [Tarthang]
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Shunyata mantra (shu nya ta'i sngags). The mantra Om svabhava shuddho sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham. [RY]
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SHURMA (shur ma). A Tibetan script, half way between printed and written script.[AL] [RY]
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Shurpa vina (dgu po rgyud mang). A kind of vina. [RY]
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Shutö Terdrom at Drigung ('bri gung gzhu stod gter sgrom); see NW, fol. 1b and 5b. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sibtsen land of Mön (mon gyi srib btsan lung) [LW1] [RY]
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Siddha - one who has accomplished the siddhis. [RY]
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Siddha - Tantric master who attains direct realization outside the conventional course of study [RY]
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Siddha (grub pa) (grub thob),. Perfected one, realized one, adept who has attained siddhi. [RY]
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Siddha (grub thob). 'Accomplished one.' Someone who has attained siddhi; an accomplished master. [ZL] [RY]
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Siddhi (bsgrub) lit. 'success, complete attainment'; there are eight 'common' siddhis developed by the practice of yoga. Among these are clairvoyance, clairaudiance, the ability to fly through the air, the ability to read thoughts, and control of the body and external world, enabling one to transform both at will. The supreme siddhis is enlightenment. [RY]
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Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' The attainment resulting from Dharma practice usually referring to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment. It can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments such as clairvoyance, clairaudiance, flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation; the ability to control of the body and external world. The most eminent attainments on the path are, however, renunciation, compassion, unshakable faith and realization of the correct view.[Primer] [RY]
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Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' The attainment resulting from Dharma practice usually referring to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment. It can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments such as clairvoyance, clairaudiance, flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation; the ability to control of the body and external world. The most eminent attainments on the path are, however, renunciation, compassion, unshakable faith and realization of the correct view. [RY]
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Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' Usually refers to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment, but can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments. [RY]
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Siddhi (dngos grub). See Accomplishment. [ZL] [RY]
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Siddhi (dngos grub). Success, attainment, esp. Magical attainment such as flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation. They are divided into supreme s. (mchog gi dngos grub) and ordinary or common s. (mthun mong gi dngos grub), [RY]
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Siddhi of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po'i dngos grub). Same as enlightenment. In the context of Mahayoga Tantra, it can also refer to the attainment of the third vidyadhara level in which 'mahamudra' means the sublime body of the yidam deity. [RY]
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Siddhi rastu. "May it be accomplished!" [RY]
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Siddhis (dngos grub). The supreme and common accomplishments. The supreme siddhi is the accomplishment of complete enlightenment. The common siddhis are usually eight types of miraculous powers. [RY]
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siddhis (dngos grub); supreme and common [LW1] [RY]
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Side Ornament. See Zurgyen [LW1] [RY]
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Side Ornament; [LWx] [RY]
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Sign (rtags). See 'symbol, meaning, and sign.' [RY]
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Sign language of dakinis (mkha' 'gro'i brda yig). The secret script of the female spiritual beings which can only be decoded by accomplished masters. [ZL] [RY]
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Sign Lineage of the Vidyadharas (rig 'dzin brda brgyud). The second of the three lineages. [RY]
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Sign luminosity (brda'i 'od gsal). The experiences of manifest luminosity during the bardo of dying. [RY]
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sign script (brda yig) [LW1] [RY]
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sign script; reason for; [LWx] [RY]
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sign-lineage of the Vidyadharas. The sign-lineage of the Vidyadharas is the second or middle phase of the transmission of the higher Nyingma teachings, and precedes the oral lineage of the individuals, described in note 51. In the Mahayoga, this is the transmission of teachings from the Bodhisattva Vajrapani to a group of five beings: a deva, a yaksha, a rakshasa, a naga and a human. They then wrote these teachings out as texts that they hid in space, from which they later fell like rain onto the palace of King Indrabhuti the First. [Peter Roberts]
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signs of progress (drod rtags); of a master [LW1] [RY]
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signs of progress; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Signs, eighty (anuvyanjana, dpe byad). See Marks and Signs [RY]
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Sikkim. [RY]
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Sikojhara. [Daki] [RY]
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Silden (bsil ldan); Same as Tibet [LW1] [RY]
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Silk Route - Trade route between China and the West that passed through the Central Asian oasis states [RY]
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Silk Route - Trade route between China and the West that passed through the Central Asian oasis states. [Tarthang]
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silver images of the Three Protectors (rigs gsum mgon po) of Korchag ('khor chags) in Purang, representing the Bodhisattvas Manjusri, Avalokitesvara and Vajrapani. For a detailed description of the fascinating story of these three statues, see Ngawang Sonam Gyaltsen (1988). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Simple (nis-prapanca, spros (pa (dang)) bral (ba)). 'Free of elaboration', i.e. devoid of conventional objects, which are mere mental projections. [RY]
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Simplicity (spros bral). 1) The absence of creating mental construct or conceptual formulations about the nature of things. 2) The second stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]
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Simplicity (spros bral). The second stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]
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Sin. see Evil [RY]
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SINDHURA (sin dhu ra). Red or deep orange substance often used in tantric rituals.[AL] [RY]
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Sindhura (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]
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sindhura as an ingredient. Sindhura literally means "sediment from the banks of the Indus", a red earth from a place sacred to Vajrayogini, though the word is used for sacred red earth from any place. Lead oxide (red-lead powder) also called minium, is often used as a substitute. [Peter Roberts]
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Singala (Skt.). The land where the Anu Yoga teachings appeared. [ZL] [RY]
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Singhamukha (seng ge mdong ma). [Peter Roberts]
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Singharaja of Ruley (ru le sim ha ra dza). One of the first Tibetans to take ordination who received transmission from Hungkara in India. Also known as Viryaraja of Ru-yong. [ZL] [RY]
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single bindu of self-knowing awareness. Bindu of self-knowing awareness: "bindu" literally means a tiny sphere or drop, meaning that the self-knowing awareness contains within itself, all the multiplicity of samsara and nirvana, without any omission whatsoever. [Peter Roberts]
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Single Crescent (zla gam gcig pa). [ZL] [RY]
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Single Family of the Great Secret (gsang chen rigs gcig). Sadhana text of Mahayoga composed by Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]
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Single Fire and Sole Skull (me gcig thod gcig). [ZL] [RY]
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Single Form (phyag rgya rkyang pa). Sadhana text of Mahayoga composed by Padmasambhava. The title refers to the sadhana practice of a single deity without a retinue. [ZL] [RY]
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Single Meditation Tantra (bsam gtan gcig pu'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Single Mind Tantra (nyag gcig dgongs pa'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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Single Mother and Queen of Siddhas (ma cig grub pa'i rgyal mo). [ZL] [RY]
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single mudra (phyag rgya gcig pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Single mudra. The elaborate mudra. The collected assembly practice. (phyag rgya gcig spros tshom bu tshogs sgrub). The single mudra is a deity on its own. The elaborate mudra is a more complex visualisation of a single deity. The gathered-assembly mudra is a group of deities. [Peter Roberts]
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single nature ignorance (bdag nyid gcig pa'i ma rig pa); as synonym for the all-ground; expl.; [LWx] [RY]
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single recollection (dran pa gcig pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Single recollection" (dran pa gcig pa) of the Sarma Schools and the "single mudra" (phyag rgya gcig pa) of the Nyingma School are identical. [RY]
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Single sphere (thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [ZL] [RY]
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Single Sphere (thig le nyag gcig). [ZL] [RY]
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Single sphere (thig le nyag gcig). Synonym for dharmakaya. [RY]
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Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [RY]
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Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). All buddhas are one in the all-encompassing space of dharmakaya which is 'round' in the sense of being beyond the 'corners' of thought constructs. [RY]
 +
 +
Single sufficient jewel (nor bu gcig chog). The personal teacher regarded as the embodiment of the Three jewels, the Three Roots, and the Three Kayas. [RY]
 +
 +
Single Syllable (yi ge gcig ma). A short Prajnaparamita sutra. Refers to the letter a, the syllable symbolizing the nonarising nature of emptiness. [ZL] [RY]
 +
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single traversed path (bgrod gcig lam) [LW1] [RY]
 +
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single traversed path (bgrod gcig lam) [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
single-nature ignorance (bdag nyid gcig pa'i ma rig pa); as synonym for the all-ground [LW1] [RY]
 +
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Sitavana (bsil ba tshal) [RY]
 +
 +
Sitavana charnel ground. [Daki] [RY]
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Sitavana. See Cool Grove [LW1] [RY]
 +
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Situ Chökyi Jungne, Situ VIII: 1700-1774 [MR]
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Situ Chökyi Jungney [LW1] [RY]
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 +
Situ Gyurmey Tsewang Gyatso [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
Situ I Chökyi Gyaltsen (chos kyi rgyal mtshan): 1377-1448 [MR]
 +
 +
Situ Padma Nyinche (si tu pad ma nyin byed). [1774-1853] The 9th Situ Rinpoche and one of the root teachers of the 14th Karmapa and Jamgön Kongtrül. He was predicted by Guru Rinpoche as his own mind-emanation. [RY]
 +
 +
Situ Pandita [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
Situ Pema Nyinche: 1774-1853 [MR]
 +
 +
Situ Tenpai Nyinche: 1774-1853. [RY]
 +
 +
six abodes of Desire gods ('dod lha ris drug) [LW1] [RY]
 +
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six abodes of Desire gods [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
six bardos (bar do). Bardo, "intermediate" or "transition" state, commonly refers to the transitional state between death and the next rebirth. Texts discuss six bardos: the bardos of birth and life (skye gnas rang bzhin gyi bar do); of meditative concentration (bsam gtan gyi bar do); of the dream-state (rmi lam gyi bar do); of the moment of death ('chi kha'i bar do); of the absolute nature (chos nyid bar do); and of taking a new existence (srid pa'i bar do). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
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Six basic miseries in samsara;: (1) Friends and enemies are changeable., (2) We never seem to have enough., (3) We die again and again., (4) We are reborn again and again., (5) We go up and down in samsara again and again., (6) We are essentially alone. [MR]
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six branches of practice, according to the Kalachakra (dus 'khor sbyor ba yan lag drug). Composure (sor-sdud), contemplation (bsam gtan), breath-control (srog 'dzin), apprehension of the complete deity (sku ril bur 'dzin pa), subsequent recollection of this (rjes su dran pa), and contemplation (ting nge 'dzin). See NS, vol. 2, p.151, and DZ, vol. 16. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Six characteristics (khams drug ldan). Earth, water, fire, and wind, along with the spiritual channels (rtsa) and the vital essence (thig le), are the six things that make a human being a suitable vessel for receiving the four empowerments (dbang, or Skt. abhiseka) and consequently able to practice the Vajrayana. Celestial beings from the form realm and the formless realm have subtle elements only, or none, and lack the proper support of the channels, energies (rlung), and vital essences for receiving the second and third empowerments. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
six characteristics particular to human beings. The four elements of earth, water, fire, and wind, along with the spiritual channels (rtsa) and vital essence (thig le), are the six characteristics that make a human being a suitable vessel for receiving the four empowerments (dbang, or Skt. abhiseka), and consequently for practicing the Vajrayana. Celestial beings from the form realm and the formless realm have subtle elements only, or none, and lack the proper support of the channels, energies (rlung), and vital essences, for receiving the second and third empowerments. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Six clairvoyances; (mngon shes drug) : rdzul 'phrul gyi mngon par shes pa, lha'i rna ba'i mngon par shes pa, gzhan gyi sems shes pa, sngon gyi gnas rjes su dran pa, lha'i mig, zag pa zad pa'i mgnon par shes pa [MR]
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SIX CLASSES OF BEINGS ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demigods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings.[AL] [RY]
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Six classes of beings ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demi-gods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [RY]
 +
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six classes of beings ('gro ba rigs drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Six classes of sentient beings ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demigods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [ZL] [RY]
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six classes of vajrayana tantras (rgyud sde drug). Kriya, upa, yoga, maha, anu and ati. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 +
 +
Six collections [of consciousness] (tshogs drug). The five sense consciousnesses and the mind consciousness. [RY]
 +
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six collections of consciousness (rnam shes tshogs drug); listing of; See also eight collections [LW1] [RY]
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six collections; listing of; see also 'eight collections' [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
six consciousnesses. The six consciousnesses are those of sight, hearing, smelling, tasting and tactile sensations, and the mental consciousness. [Peter Roberts]
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six dharmas (chos drug). Also known as Six Yogas of Naropa. 1) Inner heat (gtum mo), 2) illusory body (sgyu lus), 3) dream (rmi lam), 4) luminosity ('od gsal), 5) transference of consciousness ('pho ba), 6) intermediate or transition state (bar do). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Six Doctrines of Naropa (chos drug). Tummo, illusory body, dream, luminosity, bardo, and phowa. See also the 'path of means.' [RY]
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six excellences (dam pa drug); listing of Mahayana practice [LW1] [RY]
 +
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six excellences; listing of [LWx] [RY]
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 +
Six great qualities (che ba drug). The sixfold greatness of the Early Translations: The sponsor who invited, the place of translation, the translators, the panditas, the offering gifts, and the translated teachings. [RY]
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 +
Six Heights of Dokham (mdo khams gang drug) (check spellings see AC I-4) 1) Zalmo Gang; (zal mo sGgng); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba /or tshap? sgang); 3) Markham Gang (rmar kham sgang); 4) Pomzer /or Powor Gang ? (spom ser /or spo 'bor? sgang); 5) Mardza Gang /or Dridza Zermo Gang?? (rma rdza /or 'bri rdza zer mo?? sgang) and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyak rab sgang). [MR]
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six kinds of transmigration [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
Six kleshas (nyon mongs drug). Desire, hatred and delusion in addition to pride, envy, and avarice. [RY]
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Six lamps (sgron ma drug). A key term in Tögal practice. [RY]
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Six limitations (mtha' drug) are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) true/ definitive meaning (nges don), 3) implied (dgongs pa can), 4) not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). [RY]
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 +
six limits (mtha' drug), detailed expl.; listing of [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
SIX LIMITS (mtha' drug). The views of the expedient and definitive meaning, the implied and the not implied, the literal and the not literal. Together with the 'four modes' they form the indispensable keys for unlocking the meaning of the tantras. [AL] [RY]
 +
 +
six limits (mtha' drug); listing of [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
six limits and four modes (mtha' drug tshul bzhi). See six limits, four modes [LW1] [RY]
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 +
Six limits and four modes (mtha' drug tshul bzhi). The indispensable keys for unlocking the meaning of the tantras. The six limits are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) definitive meaning (nges don), 3) the implied (dgongs pa can), 4) the not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) the literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) the not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). The four modes (tshul bzhi) are the 1) literal (tshig), 2) general (spyi), 3) hidden (sbas), and the 4) ultimate (mthar thug). [RY]
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six limits and four modes; detailed expl. [LWx] [RY]
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 +
Six limits of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags kyi mtha' drug). The views of the expedient and definitive meaning, the implied and the not implied, the literal and the not literal. [ZL] [RY]
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Six Lineage Traditions (brgyud pa'i bka' srol drug). The buddha's mind lineage, the vidyadhara's sign lineage, the oral lineage of great masters, the dakini's entrustment lineage, the empowered aspiration lineage, the yellow parchment lineage There are other alternative lists. See Tulku Thondrup's Hidden Teachings of Tibet, Wisdom Publications. [RY]
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Six lineages (brgyud pa drug). See Six Lineage Traditions. [RY]
 +
 +
six major monastic centers for the Nyingma School in Tibet; listing [LW1] [RY]
 +
 +
six major monastic centers for the Nyingma tradition in Tibet; listing; [LWx] [RY]
 +
 +
Six million tantras (rgyud 'bum phrag drug cu). The tantras of Dzogchen received by Garab Dorje from Vajrasattva. [RY]
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Six modes of exposition; ('chad pa'i mtshul drug) are: body straight, the eyebrows hightened, gazing with the eyes half closed, mouth open, with the tongue extended in between the conch-white teeth, and speaking with the melodious voice of Brahma. [MR]
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six Munis (thub drug) [LWx] [RY]
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six munis (thub pa drug) [LW1] [RY]
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Six Ornaments and the Two Supreme Ones (rgyan drug mchog gnyis). The six ornaments are Nagarjuna, Aryadeva, Asanga, Dignaga, Vasubhandu and Dharmakirti. The two supreme ones are Shakyaprabha and Gunaprabha. [RY]
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six ornaments of the world ('dzam gling rgyan drug). Six great Indian panditas, namely Nagarjuna, Asanga, Dignaga, Aryadeva, Vasubandhu, and Dharmakirti. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Six Ornaments Which Beautify the Jambu Continent ('dzam gling mdzes pa'i rgyan drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Six Ornaments which Beautify the Jambu Continent; listing of [LWx] [RY]
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Six paramitas (phar phyin drug). The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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 +
SIX PARAMITAS (phar phyin drug). The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge. [AL] [RY]
 +
 +
six paramitas (phar phyin drug); definite number; definition of; different types of; four special qualities [LW1] [RY]
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 +
six paramitas. The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge.[Primer] [RY]
 +
 +
six paramitas; definite number; definition of; different types of; expl.; four special qualities; four special qualities (khyad chos bzhi) [LWx] [RY]
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 +
six periods of the day. The early, middle and later parts of the daytime and the night-time.The three periods being those of the daytime. [Peter Roberts]
 +
 +
six periods of the day: are the early, middle and late part of the day-time, and the early, middle and late part of the night-time. [Peter Roberts]
 +
 +
Six Ranges of Dokham (smad mdo khams sgang drug), which are 1) Zalmo Gang (zal mo sgang); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba sgang); 3) Markham Gang (smar khams sgang); 4) Powor Gang (spo 'bor sgang); 5) Mardza Gang (dmar rdza sgang); and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyag rab sgang). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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 +
six ranges of dokham (smad mdo khams sgang drug). According to AC, vol.1, p.4, these are 1) Zalmo Gang (zal mo sgang); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba sgang); 3) Markham Gang (smar khams sgang); 4) Powor Gang (spo 'bor sgang); 5) Mardza Gang (dmar rdza sgang) and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyag rab sgang). See CN, p.* [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Six realms (gnas ris drug). The realms of the six classes of beings. [RY]
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Six realms (rigs drug gi gnas). The worlds of gods, demigods, humans, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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six realms/classes of sentient beings ('gro ba rigs drug). 1) Celestial beings (lha), 2) antigods or demi-gods (lha ma yin), 3) human beings (mi), 4) animals (dud 'gro), 5) tormented spirits (yi dwags), and 6) denizens of the hells (dmyal ba). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Six recollections (rjes dran drug). There are different lists of which the most appropriate is: Recollection of the yidam deity, the path, the place of rebirth, the meditative state, the oral instructions of the teacher, and the view. [RY]
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Six recollections (rjes dran drug). There are different lists, of which the most appropriate is: Recollection of the yidam deity, the path, the place of rebirth, the meditative state, the oral instructions of the teacher, and the view. In his Great Pointing-out Instruction of the Four Bardo States, Padmasambhava mentions these recollections: "By remembering the yidam deity you behold the countenance of the peaceful and wrathful deities of the three kayas. By remembering the path you gain mastery over the innate nature in the bardo. By remembering the place of rebirth you are reborn in a nirmanakaya realm even though you may be of the inferior type of capacity. By remembering the meditation state you remain in meditation for five days. By remembering the master's oral instructions you realize that your personal experience is unimpeded wakefulness. By remembering the view you realize that the spontaneous presence is the mandala of sambhogakaya. Like meeting a person you already know, you recognize your natural face." [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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six related causes of dependent origination [LW1] [RY]
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six related causes; [LWx] [RY]
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six related conditions of dependent origination [LW1] [RY]
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six related conditions; [LWx] [RY]
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Six Ridges of Lower Dokham; listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Six Ridges; listing of [LWx] [RY]
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six root disturbances (rtsa nyon drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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six root disturbances; listing of [LWx] [RY]
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Six Sadhana Sections (sgrub pa sde drug). The phrasing of these six types of scripture differs slightly among the various versions of Chronicles of Padmasambhava's life. In his Narration of the Precious Revelation of the Terma Treasures, Longchen Rabjam rephrases the same sequence from the Sanglingma so that the Six Sadhana Sections refer to the six scriptures mentioned just above. In that way they are equal to the Six Secret Sections (gsang ba sde drug) including the scriptures for Manjushri Body, Lotus Speech, Vishuddha Mind, Nectar Quality, Kilaya Activity, and Liberating Sorcery of Mother Deities. [ZL] [RY]
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Six Sala Lek (sa la legs drug) [LW1] [RY]
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Six Scriptures on Reasoning (rigs tshogs drug) [LW1] [RY]
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Six Secret Sections (gsang ba sde drug). Listed in Chapter 12. The five first are found in the most common list of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]
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six sections of Tantra (rgyud sde drug) [LW1] [RY]
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six sense bases (skye mched drug); See also aggregates, elements, and sense bases [LW1] [RY]
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Six sense cognitions (rnam shes tshogs drug). A synonym for 'six sense perceptions.' [RY]
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Six sense faculties (dbang po drug). The five senses and the mental faculty. [RY]
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six sense perceptions (tshogs drug gi snang ba). Sights, sounds, smells, tastes, tactile sensations, and mental events. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Six sense perceptions (tshogs drug gi snang ba). The experiences of sights, sounds, smells, tastes, textures and mental objects. [RY]
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Six Spheres (klong drug pa). See also Tantra of the Six Spheres of Samantabhadra [LW1] [RY]
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Six Spheres (klong drug pa); expl.; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
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Six Spheres. (klong drug pa), one of the 17 Dzogchen tantras. [RY]
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Six Stains (dri ma drug). [RY]
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Six stains {dri ma drug}. Pride, lack of faith, lack of effort, outward distraction, inward tension and discouragement. [RY]
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six superior qualities of the Nyingma School, listing of [LW1] [RY]
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six superior qualities; of the Nyingma School, listing of [LWx] [RY]
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Six Superknowledges (mngon par shes pa drug). The capacities for performing miracles, divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, and the cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.[AL] [RY]
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six superknowledges (mngon shes drug); listing [LW1] [RY]
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Six Syllables (yi ge drug pa). The mantra of Avalokiteshvara: om mani padme hung. [RY]
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Six Syllables [LW1] [RY]
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Six tantra sections (rgyud sde drug) The three outer tantras of Kriya, Upa and Yoga and the three inner tantras of Maha, Anu and Ati. [RY]
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Six transcending actions (pha rol tu phyin pa drug). See 'six paramitas.' [RY]
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Six transcending perfections {pha rol tu phyin pa drug}. Generosity, moral discipline, patience, diligence, concentration and discriminating awareness. [RY]
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Six Treatises of the Kadampas (bka' gdams gzhung drug):, mdo sde rgyan /(some have nyan thos pa'i sa), byang chub sems dpa'i sa, bslab pa kun btus, spyod 'jug, skyes rabs, ched du brjod pa'i tshoms [MR]
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six unions (sbyor ba drug) [LW1] [RY]
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Six Unions (sbyor drug). One of the Eight Great Chariots of the Practice Lineage embodying the pith instruction for the practice of Kalachakra.[EMP] [RY]
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Six Unions (sbyor drug). See Jordruk. [RY]
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Six Vajra Lines (rdo rje tshig rkang drug). The supplication to Guru Rinpoche called Dusum Sangye. [RY]
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Six Vajra Lines (rdo rje'i tshig drug). [ZL] [RY]
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Six views (mtha' drug) are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) true/ definitive meaning (nges don), 3) implied (dgongs pa can), 4) not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). [RY]
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Six ways of expounding the inner tantras; ('chad pa'i mtha' drug), as mentioned in the rgyud gal po che: (1) According to the conventional meaning /truth (drang don), (2) Ultimate certain meaning /truth (nges don), (3) With a hidden meaning behind intellible words which have an ordinary meaning (dgons pa can), (4) In a explicit way, without hidden meaning (dgons min), (5) In ordinary words of common language (sgra ji bzhin pa), and (6) in symbolic words arranged in sentences which makes no sense without a key for their understanding (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa) (YNO, p. 24-26) [MR]
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six wealths. The six wealths are: Long life; great power; good fortune; great majesty; great retinue; many possessions. [Peter Roberts]
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Six worlds ('jig rten drug). The realms of the six classes of beings. [RY]
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Six Yogas (rnal 'byor drug). See 'Six Doctrines of Naropa.' [RY]
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Six Yogas {chos drug}. The yoga of psychic heat {gtum mo}; the yoga of the illusory body {sgyu lus}; the yoga of dream {rmi lam}; the yoga of luminosity {'od gsal};  the yoga of consciousness transference {'pho ba} and the yoga of the intermediate state {bar do}. [RY]
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Six Yogas of Naropa with the Three Confidences, this refers to the zab lam na ro chos drug gi khrid rim yid ches gsum ldan of Tsongkhapa.  [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sixfold taking as path (lam khyer drug). [RY]
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Six-fold Vajra Yoga - This refers to the six branches of practice according to the Kalachakra (dus 'khor sbyor ba yan lag drug). See DZ, Vol. 16 and NS, vol. 2, p.151. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sixteen Abodes of the Realm of Form (gzugs khams gnas rigs bcu drug) [LW1] [RY]
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Sixteen arhants (gnas brtan bcu drug). Also known as the Sixteen Sthaviras. [RY]
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Sixteen Arhats -() Disciples of the Buddha who vowed to preserve the Dharma until the coming of Maitreya [RY]
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sixteen moments (skad cig ma bcu drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]
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Sixteen Spheres (thig le bcu drug) is a renowned sadhana which belongs to the pith instructions (man ngag) section of the Kadampa tradition. Avalokitesvara is visualized with sixteen other deities in his heart, one within the other, and each one in a sphere of light. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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sixteen vowels and thirty consonants; listing of, see also '[[Ali Kali]]]' [LW1] [RY]
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Sixth Buddha (rgyal ba drug pa). Refers to Vajradhara. [RY]
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Sixth Buddha Regent (drug pa'i rgyal tshab) [LW1] [RY]
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Sixth Buddha Regent; expl.; [LWx] [RY]
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Sixth Dalai Lama 1., Tsangyang Gyatso:6th; 1683-1702: Gushri Khan (Qosot Mongol prince) defeats the Tsangpa Ruler Karma Tenkyong Wangpo in 1642, and with the help of Desi Sönam Chopel unifies Tibet under the rule of the 5th Dalai Lama. Gushri Khan dies in Lhasa at the eage of 73, in 1675. Sönam Chopel dies in 1676 and is replaced by Desi Sangye Gyatso; in 1679, (after the resignation of Desi Losang Jinpa) at the age of 29. Nicknamed Desi Golep he was a great erudite, a tireless administrator and sometime a ruthless leader. When the great 5th passed away in 1682 this fact was concealed from the people for many years. Secretely too, the Desi had send parties to find the new incarnation, and in 1685, an extraordinary child, born in 1683 to a reputed Nyingma Tantric family descended from the damed Tertön Padma Lingpa;, was found in Tawang, Mön-yul. [RY]
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Sixth Dalai Lama 2. In August 1697 annoucement was made of both the demise of the 5th Dalai Lama and of the finding of his reicarnation. The 2nd Panchen. Losang Yeshe was invited to Nagartse and gave to the young Dalai Lama the novice vows and the name Losang Rigzin Tsan-yang Gyatso, in 1697. In October 1687, the Sixth Dalai Lama was enthroned in Lhasa. The young Dalai Lama turned to be a simple, gifted, artist, and carefree young man, who disliked the pomp of Potala, and preferred mingling with the daily life of his people, walking instead of riding horse and enjoying the charm of nature. Leading a most simple life he would make his own tea and share it with anyone who would come to receive his audience. He would teach in public places and not in the magnificent Potala. Pressed by the Desi and the Panchen Lama to take full monastic vows, to everyone bewilderment, Tsang-yang Gyatso returned instead the novice vows he had receive earlier. From then on he lived as a lay yogin. Condensed from: Songs of the Sixth Dalai Lama, Translated from the Tibetan by K.Dhondup, Library of Tibetan Works and Archives Dharamsala, 1981 [MR]
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Sixth Dalai Lama, Tsangyang Gyatso (tshangs dbyangs rgya mtsho, 1683-1702) and the regent-king, Desi Sangye Gyatso (sde srid sangs rgyas rgya mtsho, 1653-1703). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sixth Rigdzin Chenpo of Dorje Drak, Kunzang Gyurme Lhundrup (rdor brag 'rig 'dzin chen po kun bzang 'gyur med lhun grub). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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sixty aspects of melodious speech (gsung dbyangs yan lag drug bcu) [LW1] [RY]
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Sixty aspects of speech (gsung dbyangs yan lag drug cu), according to Tantra, there are six categories: like the voice of Brahma, cymbals, song, the kalapinga bird, thunder, and a sitar. There are sixty aspects when each of them are multiplied by these ten: generating understanding, comprehensible, being worthy of respect, without discord, extremely profound, acceptable, indomitable, pleasing to hear, unconfused, and extremely distinct. [RY]
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Sixty Verses of Reasoning; Yuktisastika-karika; (rigs pa drug cu pa); Nagarjuna, 1st-2nd century. [PK] [RY]
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Sixty-eight Crescents (zla gam drug cu rtsa brgyad). Name of a mandala connected to the teachings of Vishuddha Heruka. [ZL] [RY]
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sixty-four qualities of freedom and maturation (bral smin yan tan drug cu rtsa bzhi) [LW1] [RY]
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sixty-four sacred places and countries (gnas yul drug cu rtsa bzhi) [LW1] [RY]
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Skanda (skem byed). Skanda is the Brahmanical god of war, leader of demons that cure illness in children, and the god of thieves. The skandas' are no doubt these demons, however the Tib. name, which means 'drier-up', is puzzling. [RY]
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Skandha (phung po). [RY]
 +
 +
Skandhas (phung po). Gathering or aggregation of many parts. See 'five skandhas/ aggregates.' [RY]
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 +
skandhas, dhatus and ayatanas. Skandhas: (Tibetan: phung po) "Aggregations". The five aggregations: physical forms, sensations, identification, mental activities (within which the second and third aggregates are in fact included) and consciousnesses. / Dhatus: (Tibetan - khams) "Elements". The eighteen elements of mental and sensory experience: The six consciousnesses of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and the mind; the faculty of perception of these six; and the objects experienced by them - form, sound, smell, taste, physical sensation and "[mental] phenomena". / Ayatanas: (Tibetan - skye mched) "Birth and Development" are the twelve sources of perception, in fact the last twelve of the list of dhatus, the consciousnesses not being included in the ayatanas. These are all derived from the abhidharma teachings. [Peter Roberts]
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Skandhas, the five aggregates (phung po lnga). The five aspects which comprise the physical and mental constituents of a sentient being: physical forms, sensations, conceptions, formations, and consciousnesses.[Primer] [RY]
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Skillful Lasso (thabs kyi zhags pa). Also known as Concise Lotus Garland (pad mo phreng ba'i don bsdus pa), this scripture functions as a support for rituals to attain accomplishment. See [[Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras]]. [ZL] [RY]
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Skillful means (thabs la mkhas pa). Ingenuity in application. [RY]
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Skillful means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab). The two main aspects of any practice. In Mahayana practice, they are compassion and insight into emptiness. In Vajrayana practice, they are the stages of development and completion. [RY]
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Skipping the grades type (thod rgal ba'i rigs). People whose qualities of experience and realization increase and decrease without sequential order. [RY]
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 +
skull bowl that possesses all the ideal qualities. There are various signs that indicate a powerfully auspicious skull-bowl, the most important of which is one in which the entire skull is one piece, without being divided into sections by the lines of cranial joints. [Peter Roberts]
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Skull Pieces (thod pa'i dum bu) [LW1] [RY]
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 +
skull-damaru, and so on. A skull-damaru is made of the tops of two crania, though more commonly a damaru made of wood or ivory in the shape of the crania is used. A skull with particular qualities is considered to naturally assist in the gaining of spiritual accomplishments if used in one's practice. [Peter Roberts]
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Sky burial - In Tibet corpses are cut up in a special way, so that the vultures can feed on them. It was considered inauspicious if vultures did not come, or came but did not eat the corpse. The corpses are sometimes dismembered by monks or, in populated areas, by professionals. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sky Dancer, Namkhai Nyingpo, by Keith Dowman, Rutledge & Kegan-Paul, London. [ZL] [RY]
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Sky Plain (gung thang). [ZL] [RY]
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Sky Plain of Lhaitsa (gnam thang lha'i rtsa). [ZL] [RY]
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Sky Plain Pass (gung thang la kha). [ZL] [RY]
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Sky Treasury Consecration Tantra (nam mkha' mdzod byin rlabs kyi rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Sky Treasury Consecration Tantra (nam mkha' mdzod byin rlabs kyi rgyud). The word sky treasury has the connotation of inexhaustible wealth. [ZL] [RY]
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sky-burial - Only the corpses of Dharma practitioners and special persons were actually cremated in Tibet. Others were given "sky-burial"; their corpses were cut up and fed to the vultures. People believed that the smoke from the cremation of ordinary bodies would defile the sky realm of the local deities and mountain gods. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sky-faced One (gnam zhal ma). The consort of Kalden Drendsey. [RY]
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Sky-Iron Vajra". "The Sky-Iron Vajra" (gnam lcags rdo rje) is the second of Jatson Nyingpo's volumes of termas, devoted to long-life practice. [Peter Roberts]
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Sky-soarer, khe-cara, (mkha' la spyod pa). 'One who goes in the air', deity, dakini; also conceivably Khasarpana, a form of Avalokiteshvara. [RY]
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Slate Mountain Ridge (g.ya ri gong). [ZL] [RY]
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Slaughter Rakshas (bshan pa srin po). [ZL] [RY]
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Slayer of Demons (bdud kyi bshed chen). One of the 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. Same as Dükyi Shechen. [RY]
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Sle kug bzhad pa'i rdo rje: 5th incarnation of lho brag grub chen. Wrote many volumes related to the mkha' 'gro gsang ba ye shes of smin gling and chos rje gling pa. [MR]
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smoke-offerings. Smoke-pujas: (bsangs), meaning a cleansing of the area through aromatic incenses. brngan, the second syllable means "payment" referring to the act of making a gift to local deities in lieu of their activity of protection) A native Tibetan tradition of burning aromatic auspicious wood, such as cedar, but to create smoke rather than flames, with various offerings of food, cloth, etc. added. It is used to make an offering to all the Three roots and Jewels and to make a gift to all beings in Samsara. The emphasis in this practice (which also demonstrates its origins) is on local and national deities, to please and appease them, the smoke cleansing the area as well as manifesting offerings. [Peter Roberts]
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smoke-pujas. Smoke-pujas: (Tibetan: bsangs, meaning a cleansing of the area through aromatic incenses) A native Tibetan tradition of burning aromatic auspicious wood, such as cedar, but to create smoke rather than flames, with various offerings of food, cloth, etc. added. It is used to make an offering to all the Three roots and Jewels and to make a gift to all beings in Samsara. The emphasis in this practice (which also demonstrates its origins) is on local and national deities, to please and appease them, the smoke cleansing the area as well as manifesting offerings. [Peter Roberts]
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Smritijnana [LW1] [RY]
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Smrtijnanakirti - Pandita who entered Tibet from Nepal at the start of the second period of transmission, early in the eleventh century [RY]
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snake-essence (sbrul gyi snying po). Some snakes are said to have a jewel in their forehead that is called "snake-essence" (sbrul gyi snying po). By extension, "snake-essence" is used to refer to very precious things, here to a rare kind of sandalwood. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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snow grouse or Tibetan partridge (gong mo, Lat. Perdrix Hodgsoniae). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Snow Mountain of Tö - Mount Kailash. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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So Zur Nub Nyang (so zur bsnubs nyag). Great masters in the Nyingma lineage. [RY]
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Socrates: 399 BC [MR]
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Sog po mda' bcu gcig: A rig etc,. Main distinctions in Golok: mgo log, dbal shul, mdzod dge nyin rsib. [MR]
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Sogdians - Traders and scribes who played an important role in transmitting the Dharma throughout Central Asia [RY]
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Soglung (srog rlung), an illness caused by prana getting stuck in the heart center due to various strenuous circumstances. [RY]
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Sogpo Tendar (mkhas grub sog po bstan dar): 1759- [MR]
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Sole Mother, Machik Labdrön (ma gcig lab sgron, 1055-1153), who, with Padampa Sangye (pha dam pa sangs rgyas, d.1117), initiated in Tibet the lineage of the practice of Chöd (gcod), which means "cutting through" ego-clinging and other attachments. In this practice, based on the view of the Prajnaparamita, one visualizes offering one's body to the "four classes of guests" (mgron po bzhi) which are: (1) the Three Jewels, the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas who elicit faith and respect, (2) the protectors of the Dharma who are endowed with good qualities, (3) sentient beings who deserve our compassion, and (4) negative harmful spirits to whom we must repay karmic debts. On the history of Chöd see J. Gyatso (1989). On translations of Machik's biographies see A. Tempa Gyaltsen et al. (1990) and J. Edou (1993). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sole Ornament of the Five Families of Vajrasattva (rdor sems rigs lnga rgyan gcig) is the peaceful aspect of the Taktsang Phurba cycle. See RT vol.31 (Ki) and note 54 above. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Solkha. [RY]
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Somo Tsang. [RY]
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Son - Korean form of Ch'an teachings that became one of the major forms of Korean Buddhism [RY]
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Sona - One of the missionaries of Ashoka's time sent to Suvarnabhumi, identified with Burma in the Burmese tradition [RY]
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Sönam Gyatso: 1543-1588. [RY]
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Sönam Tashi: 1352-1412 [MR]
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Sönam Tsemo (bsod nams rtse mo) :1142-1182. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]
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Sönam Tsemo(bsod nams rtse mo), son of Kunga Nyingpo: 1142-1182 [MR]
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Songnor Rinpoche. [RY]
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Songpo Labpey. [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo (srong btsan sgam po). (569-650) or (617-650). The king of Tibet in the seventh century Tibetan who prepared the way for transmission of the teachings. He is regarded as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara. He married Bhrikuti of Nepal and Wen Cheng of China who each brought a sacred statue of Buddha Shakyamuni to Lhasa. Songtsen Gampo built the first Buddhist temples in Tibet, established a code of laws based on Dharma principles, and had his minister Thönmi Sambhota develop the Tibetan script. During his reign the translation of Buddhist texts into Tibetan began. [ZL] [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo / Srong btsan sgam po - Seventh century Tibetan Dharma king who prepared the way for transmission of the teachings; regarded as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo / Srong btsan sgom po (7th century) first great Dharma King, who united the Tibetan Kingdom. He married two Buddhist princesses, Bhrikuti of Nepal and Wen ch'eng of China. He built the first Buddhist temples, established a code of laws based on Dharma principles, developed the Tibetan script with the help of his minister Thon mi Sambhota and also began the translation of Buddhist texts into Tibetan. Srong btsan sgam po was succeeded by: Gung srong, Mang srong, 'dus srong, and Khri lde gtsug btsan (Mes ag tshoms) [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo [LW1] [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo: 609- 649/698?. [RY]
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Songtsen Gampo: 609-698, according to Gendun Chöphel: 617-650 (see White Annals p.13) [MR]
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Songtsen Gampo; [LWx] [RY]
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Söpa Gyatso is the first Khardo Rinpoche. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sopo Tendar: 1759-. [RY]
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Sosaling (so sa gling). [ZL] [RY]
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Sosaling. [Daki] [RY]
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Sotokpa Lodrö Gyaltsen (Sog bzlog pa blo gros rgyal mtshan): 1552- [MR]
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Sounds, colors and lights (sgra 'od zer gsum). The first manifestations in the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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space (dbyings). See dharmadhatu [LW1] [RY]
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Space dissolving in luminosity (nam mkha' 'od gsal la thim pa). The dividing point between the bardo of dying and the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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Space Section (klong sde). A division of Dzogchen emphasizing emptiness. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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Space sections {klong sde}. Aspect of the Dzogchen tantras. [RY]
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space; explanation of space as buddha nature [LWx] [RY]
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Spear-Wielding Criminal (mi nag gdung thung can) [LW1] [RY]
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Special Aphorisms (mched du brjod pa); aspect of excellent speech [LW1] [RY]
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Special inner preliminaries (thun min nang gi sngon 'gro). See preliminaries. [RY]
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Special inner preliminaries of four times one-hundred thousand (thun min nang gi sngon 'gro 'bum bzhi). Same as 'special preliminaries.' [RY]
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special path; in regard to the dhyanas [LW1] [RY]
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Special preliminaries (thun min gyi sngon 'gro). Taking refuge, arousing bodhicitta, recitation and meditation of Vajrasattva, mandala offerings, and guru yoga. For further details see 'Torch of Certainty,' Shambhala Publications, or 'The Great Gate,' Rangjung Yeshe Publications, 1988. [RY]
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special stage of dhyana (bsam gtan khyad par ba) [LW1] [RY]
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special stage of dhyana [LWx] [RY]
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Special Tradition of Mantrayana [LWx] [RY]
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speech (gsung); listing five types of enlightened speech [LW1] [RY]
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speech; listing five types of enlightened speech [LWx] [RY]
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Spiral of Auspiciousness: the lha rnams mnyes par byed pa'i bsangs mchod bkra shis 'khyil ba, written by the fifth Dalai Lama. This is a text for the ritual of smoke-offering (bsangs), which is made by burning leaves and branches of fragrant trees such as juniper and rhododendron, mixed with blessed ingredients. Boundless offerings, filling the sky, are visualized in the smoke and are offered to the "four classes of guests" (see Author's Introduction, note 32). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Spirits, bhuta, ('byung po; also graha, gdon; mi ma yin); malignant beings of the preta class, ghosts etc. [RY]
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Spiritual Friend, kalyana mitra, (bshes gnyen dam pa) (dge ba'i bshes gnyen). Guru. [RY]
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Spiritual Friend, kalyana mitra, (dge ba'i bshes gnyen) or (bshes gnyen dam pa). Guru. [RY]
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Spiritual life-force (thugs srog). The seed syllable usually in the heart center of the deity. [RY]
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Splendor, Peak, and Space (dpal rtse dbyings gsum) [LW1] [RY]
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Splendorous Realm (dpal dang ldan pa). The buddhafield of Ratnasambhava. [RY]
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Spontaneous Fulfillment of Wishes (bsam pa lhun grub). A supplication to Guru Rinpoche. [RY]
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Spontaneous presence (lhun grub). One of the two main aspects of Dzogchen teaching, the other being 'primordial purity' (ka dag). [RY]
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Spontaneous sound of dharmata (chos nyid kyi rang sgra). One of the first displays in the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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Spontaneous Summit Scripture (rtse mo byung rgyal gyi lung). One of the Eighteen Major Scriptures of the Mind Section of Dzogchen. Vol. KA of the Nyingma Gyübam. [ZL] [RY]
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Spontaneously Accomplished Mound (lhun grub brtsegs); charnel ground [LW1] [RY]
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Spontaneously present luminosity of the rupakayas (gzugs sku lhun grub kyi 'od gsal). The display during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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Sporting Devourer Tantra (za byed rol pa'i rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
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Spreading the Light of Wisdom [LW1] [RY]
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Sri Lanka - The island kingdom south of India; an early home of the Dharma; also known as Ceylon and Simhaladvipa [RY]
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Stages of development and completion (bskyed rdzogs kyi rim pa). The two main aspect of Vajrayana practice. [RY]
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stages of the path (lam rim); common for people of lesser capacity; common for people of medium capacity; common for people of superior capacity [LW1] [RY]
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stages of the path common for people of lesser capacity; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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stages of the path common for people of medium capacity; detailed expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Stages of the path for the three kinds of individuals (byang chub lam gyi rim pa). Perfect faith is the path of the lesser individual, perfect renunciation is the path of the mediocre individual and perfect altruism is the path of the superior individual. [RY]
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Stages of the Path for the Three Kinds of Individuals (skyes bu gsum gyi lam rim) [LW1] [RY]
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Stages of the Path for the Three Kinds of Individuals, Tsongkhapa's greater and lesser (skyes bu gsum gyi lam rim). [RY]
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Stages of the Path of Enlightenment (byang chub lam gyi rim pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Stages of the path of Mantra called "a ro'i theg chen rnal 'byor". [RY]
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stages of the path; definition of; [LWx] [RY]
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Stages, Ten (bhumi, sa). The successive steps in the career of an Arya Bodhisattva; Buddhahood is attained from the Tenth Stage. A Master of the T.S. is thus an Arya bodhisattva or a Buddha. [RY]
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Stages, two (krama, rim (pa)). Anuttara yoga tantra is divided into two main Stages, first the Stage of Generation, then when that is perfected, the Completing Stage. [RY]
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Stainless (dri ma med pa). The second of the ten bhumis. [RY]
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Stainless Sutra (dri ma med pa'i mdo). [RY]
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Stainless; bhumi [LW1] [RY]
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Stains (mala, dri ma). Sometimes = the three poisons. [RY]
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state of passion (chags rtog gnas skabs) [LW1] [RY]
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Statement and Realization. See Dharma of Statement and Realization [LW1] [RY]
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Statements and realization (lung rtogs). The authoritative scriptures and the realization of the Dharma in the minds of noble beings. [RY]
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statements. See tantras, statements, and instructions; more details of [LW1] [RY]
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Sthavira (gnas brtan pa)- School of the Elders, one of the earliest Buddhist schools, usually contrasted to the Mahasamghika [RY]
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Sthiramati - Disciple of Vasubandhu famed for his mastery of Abhidharma [RY]
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Stillness (gnas pa). Absence of thought activity and disturbing emotions, but with subtle fixation on this stillness. [RY]
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stillness. See shamatha [LW1] [RY]
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Stirring from the sleep of ignorance (ma rig gnyid skrog). See 'awakening from the sleep of ignorance.' [RY]
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Storehouse Tantra (bang mdzod kyi rgyud). [EMP] [RY]
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stream of being (rgyud, sems rgyud). [LW1] [RY]
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Stream of Wealth Goddess (nor rgyun ma). Name of a Mahayana sutra. [ZL] [RY]
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Stream-of-being (rgyud), (sems rgyud). The individual continuity of cognition in an individual sentient being. [ZL] [RY]
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Stream-of-being (sems rgyud) (rgyud),. The individual continuity of cognition in an individual sentient being. [ZL] [RY]
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stretcher. "Stretcher": The literal definition of the word is "that which is used for carrying the sick". The Tibetan in the text actually gives two names: "do li" and "khyogs" which are in fact synonymous. A third synonym also exists: "phebs byams". The word "do li" should not be confused with the purely colloquial word which means bull's testicles! This has been known to occur! The term refers to the line of mantras carrying the blessings from the deity to yourself. [Peter Roberts]
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Stuffed dummy - glud, an effigy which is a rough representation of a person offered as ransom in place of the person himself in a ritual for averting premature death. See chap.6, note 43. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Stupa - At the center of a stupa one puts a life-tree (srog shing) as its central axis. It is cut square and placed in the stupa, facing the same way as it grew in the wild. One writes on it various mantras and prayers, and one attaches precious relics to it. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Stupa - see mChod rten. [RY]
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Stupa (mchod rten). A dome-shaped monument housing relics of the Buddha or an accomplished master. The shape of the stupa embodies an elaborate symbolism. [ZL] [RY]
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Stupa of Great Purity (mchod rten rnam dag) is the stupa in front of which Sakyamuni cut his hair and vowed to renounce the world. Some place it near Ramagama, east of Kapilavistu (see Lamotte, 1958), and others near Mankapur in Uttar Pradesh (see NS Vol.2 p. 30, n. 400), or near Bodhgaya itself. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Stupa, mchod rten (Skt. stupa) lit. 'foundation of offering'; monuments often containing relics of Buddhist saints. Stupas are built according to universal principles of harmony and order. Often quite large, they focus and radiate healing energy throughout the six realms of existence. [RY]
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Stupidity-meditation (blun sgom). [RY]
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Style of the Trikaya Jewel (sku gsum nor bu'i lugs). The manner of visualization in which the root guru is regarded as the embodiment of the three kayas. [RY]
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Subahu (lag bzang) [LW1] [RY]
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Sub-aspects of the nonvirtuous actions (mi dge ba'i yan lag). The sub-aspects of killing are to hit, beat or suppress others etc. The sub-aspects of stealing from others are to profiteer in business, soliciting and being pretentious etc. The sub-aspects of sexual misconduct are wanton talk etc. The other sub-aspects are shown through these examples. [RY]
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Subduer of Mara (bdud 'dul ma). [ZL] [RY]
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Subhuti [LW1] [RY]
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Subjugating mantras (drag snags). Mantras of wrathful deities. [ZL] [RY]
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Subjugating, subduing (vashya, dbang (du bsdu ba)). Rite for summoning or controlling another person. [RY]
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sublime purity, bliss, identity, and permanence (gtsang bde bdag rtag dam pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Sublime Vision (gya nom snang) [LW1] [RY]
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subsequent intellect [LWx] [RY]
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subsequent mind (de ma thag yid) [LW1] [RY]
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Subsequent Tantra of the Bathing Elephant (glang po chur 'jug gi rgyud phyi ma). [EMP] [RY]
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Subsequent True Enlightenment Tantra (phyi ma mngon par byang chub pa'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. found in Vol OM of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
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Subsidiary empowerments (yan lag gi dbang). [RY]
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Substance of accomplishment (dngos grub kyi rdzas). The shrine articles such as amrita and torma of which a small portion is partaken of on the morning of the last day of a retreat practice. [RY]
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Succession of Former Lives (skyes pa'i rabs); aspect of excellent speech [LW1] [RY]
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Suchandra (chos rgyal zla ba bzang po) [LW1] [RY]
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Suchness (de bzhin nyid), Skt. tattva. Synonym for emptiness or the 'nature of things,' dharmata, it can also be used to describe the unity of dependent origination and emptiness. [ZL] [RY]
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suchness (de bzhin nyid); defiled (dri bcas); in relation to sugata essence; tatha [LW1] [RY]
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Suchness (Skt. tattva, de bzhin nyid). Synonym for emptiness or the 'nature of things,' dharmata, it can also be used to describe the unity of dependent origination and emptiness. [RY]
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Suchness (tattva, de kho na nyid). Ultimate Nature, lack of true existence. [RY]
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Suchness samadhi (de bzhin nyid kyi ting nge 'dzin). The first of the three samadhis. [RY]
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sudden jump (thod rgal) [LW1] [RY]
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Sudden jump, (thod rgal), here means to jump to a higher level while skipping the grades or steps in between. [RY]
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Suddhodhana - King of the Sakyas; father of Sakyamuni Buddha. [Tarthang]
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suffering (sdug bsngal); explanation of the three types of; of change; of formations; of suffering [LW1] [RY]
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Suffering of change ('gyur ba'i sdug bsngal). 'That which is pleasant when arising and remaining but painful when ceasing.' Mainly the suffering of the three higher realms. [RY]
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suffering of formations; all-pervasive, expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Suffering upon suffering (sdug bsngal gyi sdug bsngal). 'That which is painful when arising and remaining but pleasant when ceasing.' Mainly the suffering of the three lower realms. [RY]
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Sugata (bde (bar) gshegs (pa), bder gshegs). 'One who has fared well', i.e. A Buddha. [RY]
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Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' Same as a buddha.[Primer] [RY]
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Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' 1) The historical Buddha Shakyamuni. 2) Any fully enlightened being. [ZL] [RY]
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Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' Same as a buddha. [RY]
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Sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po) applies to the aspect of the mind essence present as the indivisibility of the [two] truths as itself the essence of buddhahood. [RY]
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Sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po). Another word for buddha nature, the enlightened essence inherent in sentient beings. [RY]
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sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po); as unfabricated continuous instant; definition of; explanation of five special qualities; four qualities of; in relation to the all-ground; in terms of essence, nature, and capacity; in terms of ignorance; in terms of Proponents of Concrete Existence; nine analogies for; qualities in terms of fruition; root text definition of; synonyms for; synonyms in general context; synonyms in Vajrayana context; three reasons for [LW1] [RY]
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Sugatagarbha (bde bar gshegs pa'i snying po). 'Sugata essence.' The most common Sanskrit term for what in the West is known as 'buddha nature.' [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
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sugatagarbha. See sugata essence [LW1] [RY]
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Sugatas' Offspring, sugata suta, (bde gshegs sras po). Bodhisattva. [RY]
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Sugatas: "Those who have gone to Bliss". An epithet of the Buddhas. [Peter Roberts]
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Sukha Dharma (bde chen chos sgron). The consort of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]
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Sukhavati (bde ba can) [LW1] [RY]
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Sukhavati (bde ba can) is the Pure Realm of Buddha Amitabha;  [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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sukhavati (bde ba can) The western buddha field of Amitabha. [Rain of Wisdom]
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Sukhavati (bde ba can). 'Blissful Realm.' The pure realm of Buddha Amitabha. [ZL] [RY]
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Sukhavati (bde ba can). 'Blissful', n. of Amitabha's Pure Land. [RY]
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SUKHAVATI (bde ba can). See 'Blissful Realm.'[AL] [RY]
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Sukhavati, the Blissful Realm (bde ba can) etc is celestial, [RY]
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Sulphuk (zul phug). [ZL] [RY]
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Sülpo (srul po). A type of hideous hungry ghost. [ZL] [RY]
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Sum of the Great Vehicle, theg pa chen po'i mdo bsdu pa [MR]
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Sumeru - see Meru. [RY]
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Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the four continents. See 'Meru.' [RY]
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Sumeru, Mount (ri rab). = Meru [RY]
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Summit (rtse mo). One of the 'four aspects of ascertainment' on the path of joining. [RY]
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summit of existence (srid pa'i rtse mo) [LW1] [RY]
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Summit of existence (srid pa'i rtse mo). The highest of the four formless realms. [RY]
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Summit Tantra of Letterless Great Space (nam mkha' che yi ge med pa rtse mo'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
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sun and moon box (nyi zla ga'u). This is in the form of a small, round box, the lower half being white (made of the moon) and the upper half, or lid, being red (made of the sun). [Peter Roberts]
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Sun and Moon Union Tantra (nyi zla kha sbyor). One of the 17 Dzogchen tantras. [RY]
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Sundha Jnanaya (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]
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Superficial truth (kun rdzob kyi bden pa). [RY]
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Superior Body (lus 'phags po); Continent [LW1] [RY]
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superior indivisibility of the two truths (lhag pa'i bden gnyis dbyer med) [LW1] [RY]
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superior intention (lhag bsam); definition of; of bodhichitta; on the path of accumulation [LW1] [RY]
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Superknowledge (mngon par shes pa). Usually refers to the six 'higher perceptions' including clairvoyance, knowledge of other's minds etc. See 'six superknowledges.' [RY]
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Superknowledge (mngon shes). Divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, capacity for performing miracles, and, in the case of accomplished practitioners, the 'cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.' [ZL] [RY]
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Superknowledges (mngon shes). Divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, capacity for performing miracles, and, in the case of accomplished practitioners, the 'cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.'[EMP] [RY]
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superknowledges (mngon shes). See also six superknowledges; six; listing [LW1] [RY]
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Superknowledges, five or six (abhijna, mngon shes). The s. of magical power (of levitation, transmutation and control of one's feelings), divine hearing, knowing other's thoughts, remembering past lives, and knowing the death and rebirth of sentient beings; and (in Arhants and Buddhas only) knowledge of the exhaustion of the contaminations. [RY]
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supplementary numbers. Supplementary numbers are in order to make good any mantras that may not have been correctly recited. Traditionally, the supplementary numbers are a tenth of the total, then a tenth of that tenth is added on, etc. until reaching one. [Peter Roberts]
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Supplication to Guru Rinpoche in Seven Chapters (gsol sdebs le'u bdun ma), the Prayer for the Spontaneous Fulfillment of Aspirations (bsam pa lhun grub ma), and The Sadhana of the Lineage of Awareness-Holders (rig 'dzin gdung sgrub) belong to the cycle of practices focused upon Guru Padmasambhava rediscovered by Rigdzin Gödem (rig 'dzin rgod ldem, 1337-1408) and are part of what is known as the Northern Terma (byang gter). See NS, pp. 780-3. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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support and the supported (rten dang brten pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Support for the Accumulations (tshogs rten) Same as the objects of refuge. [RY]
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Supported shamatha (rten bcas zhi gnas). See 'shamatha with support.' [RY]
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Supporting ceremonies (zhabs brten). [RY]
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Supportive rituals (zhabs brten). Rituals performed to remove obstacles for life and health. [ZL] [RY]
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Supramundane beings are the triple sangha of shravakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas as well as the vidyadhara sangha such as the Five Eminent Ones (drva ma lnga). [RY]
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Supramundane Scripture ('jig rten las 'das pa'i mdo). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras; focused on Vishuddha Mind. Vol. RA in the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme and common accomplishments. See 'siddhis.' [RY]
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Supreme and common siddhis (mchog dang thun mong gi dngos grub). Enlightenment and mundane accomplishments. [RY]
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supreme and common siddhis, expl. [LW1] [RY]
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Supreme attainment of Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi dngos grub). 1) Supreme enlightenment. 2) The third of the four vidyadhara levels. [RY]
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Supreme Attribute (chos mchog). The fourth of the four aspects of ascertainment on the path of joining. The highest spiritual attainment within samsaric existence. [RY]
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Supreme Dharma of Intent Mindfulness (Skt. Saddharmanusmrityupastana, Tib. dam pa'i chos dran pa nye bar gzhag pa, T 287). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Supreme enlightenment (byang chub mchog), (byang chub snying po). Same as 'buddhahood.' [RY]
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Supreme enlightenment(byang chub snying po) (byang chub mchog),. Same as 'buddhahood.' [RY]
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Supreme Essence Sutra (snying po mchog gi mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Supreme Hundred Families (dam pa rigs brgya). Name of a sadhana text composed by Guru Rinpoche focused on the hundred peaceful and wrathful deities. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme King Scripture (rje btsan dam pa'i lung). One of the Eighteen Major Scriptures of the Mind Section of Dzogchen. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme Knowledge Tantra (rig pa mchog gi rgyud), Skt. Vidyottama Tantra. A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme Medicinal Nectar of the Garland of Questions and Answers (zhu len sman mchog bdud rtsi phreng ba), was written by Lodrak Drupchen Lekyi Dorje (lho brag grub chen las kyi rdo rje also known as Namkha Gyaltsen nam mkha' rgyal mtshan, 1326-1401). (see GC, vol.3, pp. 282-96). This great Nyingmapa siddha had many visions of Guru Padmasambhava and Vajrapani, whom he used to meet as if meeting real people. He was the Dzogchen master of Tsongkhapa (tsong kha pa, 1357-1419). These Questions and Answers are those that were put by Tsongkhapa to Lodrak Drupchen. The latter would, in turn, ask Vajrapani and then give the answers to Tsongkhapa. On these history and contents of these dialogues, see Ehrhard (1992) and NS, pp. 923ff. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Supreme Mountain (ri mchog). Same as Sumeru. [RY]
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Supreme mundane attribute ('jig rten chos mchog). The fourth of the four aspects of ascertainment on the path of joining. The highest spiritual attainment within samsaric existence. [RY]
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Supreme mundane quality ('jig rten chos mchog). Same as 'supreme attribute.' [RY]
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Supreme nirmanakaya (mchog gi sprul sku). An emanation to appear as a fully enlightened buddha enacting twelve deeds. [RY]
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Supreme Objects of Compassion (snying rje'i yul mchog). Refers to all the sentient beings of the six classes, especially the ones in the lower realms. [RY]
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Supreme siddhi (mchog gi dngos grub). The state of complete enlightenment. [RY]
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Supreme siddhi of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi dngos grub). See supreme siddhi. [RY]
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Supreme Steed Display (rta mchog rol pa). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme Steed Display Root Tantra (rta mchog rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. Two versions are found in Vol. HA of Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme vidyadhara (rig 'dzin mchog). See vidyadhara. [RY]
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Supreme vidyadhara level of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi rig 'dzin). 1) Supreme enlightenment. 2) The third of the four vidyadhara levels. See 'vidyadhara level of mahamudra.' [ZL] [RY]
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Supreme vidyadhara level. [Daki] [RY]
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Sur, burnt offering (gsur): an offering of smoke produced by burning tsampa (barley flour) mixed with the "three whites" (milk, butter, and cheese), the "three sweets" (sugar, molasses and honey), and blessed substances. This smoke, accompanied by a meditation upon Avalokitesvara, the Buddha of Compassion, in the form of Khasarpana, and the recitation of his mantra, om mani padme hum, relieves the pangs of hunger and thirst of the pretas (yi dwags), or hungry ghosts. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sur, burnt offering; (gsur) : and offering of smoke produced by burning barley flour, tsampa, mixed with the "three whites" (milk, butter, and cheese), the "three sweets" (sugar, molasses and honey), and blessed substances. This smoke, accompanied with a meditation upon the Buddha of Compassion, Avalokiteshvara in the form of Kasarpani and the recitation of his mantra, Om mani padme hum, relieves from the unending pangs of hunger and thirst of the hungry ghosts, the pretas. [MR]
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Surmang Monastery. [RY]
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Surmang Tenga Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]
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Susiddhikara (legs par grub pa). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
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Susiddhikara Tantra (legs par grub pa'i rgyud) [LW1] [RY]
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Sustainer of Bliss. [Daki] [RY]
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Sustainer of Peace (zhi ba 'tsho). [ZL] [RY]
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Sustaining freshness (sor zhugs). The Dzogchen version of vipashyana. [RY]
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Sustaining the essence (ngo bo skyong ba). An expression used in Mahamudra and Trekcho teachings as a substitute for 'meditation.' [RY]
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Sutra - A discourse of the Buddha. The Sutras of the Buddha are classified in accord with the Three Turnings. [RY]
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Sutra - discourses given by the Buddha on the Dharma. [RY]
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Sutra (mdo (sde)). A Discourse of the buddha, scripture of the Sutra pitaka; also, all exoteric teachings of Buddhism (the three Pitakas and their commentaries) as opposed to the esoteric, Tantric teachings. [RY]
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Sutra (mdo), (mdo sde). 1) A discourse by or inspired by the Buddha. 2) A scripture of the Sutra pitaka within the Tripitaka. 3) All exoteric teachings of Buddhism belonging to Hinayana and Mahayana, the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment, as opposed to the esoteric, tantric teachings. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]
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SUTRA (mdo), (mdo sde). 1) A discourse by or inspired by the Buddha. 2) A scripture of the Sutra pitaka within the Tripitaka. 3) All exoteric teachings of Buddhism belonging to Hinayana and Mahayana, the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment, as opposed to the esoteric, tantric teachings. [AL] [RY]
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Sutra (mdo). Discourse or teaching by the Buddha. Also refers to all the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment. Compare with 'Mantra.' [RY]
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Sutra and Mantra (mdo sngags). Sutra refers to the teachings of both Hinayana and Mahayana. Mantra refers to Vajrayana. Sutra means taking the cause as path. Tantra means taking the result as path. [ZL] [RY]
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Sutra and Mantra (mdo sngags); Dharma of Statement and Realization; hundred teachers of; one hundred teachers of; unexcelled [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra and Mantra; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Sutra and Tantra (mdo rgyud). Sutra refers to the teachings of both Hinayana and Mahayana. Tantra refers to Vajrayana. Sutra means taking the cause as path. Tantra means taking the result as path. [RY]
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Sutra and Tantra (mdo rgyud). Synonymous with Sutra and Mantra. [RY]
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Sutra and Tantra. See Sutra and Mantra [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra Designed as a Jewel Chest: (za ma tog bkod pa'i mdo) Skt. Ratnakaranda sutra; sutra on Avalokitesvara's life). [MR]
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Sutra Discriminating between the Path of Virtue and the Path of Vice (Skt. Subhasubhakarmavipaka-nirdesa-sutra, Tib. dge ba dang mi dge ba'i lam gyi rnam par smin pa bstan pa'i mdo, T 355). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra Foretelling Goodness (bzang po lung bstan pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]
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Sutra Lamkara (mdo sde rgyan). 'The Ornament of the Sutras,' one of the Five Teachings of Maitreya. [RY]
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Sutra Lamkara [LWx] [RY]
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Sutra Mahamudra (mdo'i phyag chen). The Mahamudra system based on the prajnaparamita scriptures and emphasizing shamatha and vipashyana and the progressive journey through the five paths and ten bodhisattva bhumis. [RY]
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Sutra of Compassion's White Lotus (Skt. mahakaruna-pundarika-sutra, Tib. snying rje chen po padma dkar po'i mdo, T 111-12). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of Entering the City of Vaishali (yangs pa'i grong khyer du 'jug pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of Entering the City of Vaishali, (yangs pa'i grong khyer du 'jug pa'i mdo), [RY]
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Sutra of Great Liberation (Skt. ghanaja-mahabhricaphulakarma avirnasodhaya bhudharakusumasancaya sutra, Tib. thar pa chen po'i phyogs su rgyas pa'i mdo, T 264). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of Inconceivable Secrets (gsang ba bsam gyis mi khyab pa'i mdo). [ZL] [RY]
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Sutra of Individual Liberation (Skt. Pratimoksa-sutra, Tib. so sor thar pa'i mdo, T 2). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of Inexhaustible Intellect; Akshayamatinirdesha-sutra; (blo gros mi zad pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of King-like Concentration; Samadhiraja-sutra; (mdo ting 'dzin gyal po). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of Manjusri's Perfect Emanation (Skt. manjusri-vikridita-sutra, Tib. 'jam dpal rnam par rol pa'i mdo, T 96). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of One Hundred Karmas (mdo sde las brgya pa). [RY]
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Sutra of Prajnaparamita in Eight Thousand Verses ( mdo brgyad stong pa) (see [[The Perfection of Wisdom in 8,000 Lines (RiBa)]] [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of Predictions in Magadha (dbus 'gyur lung bstan gyi mdo). [ZL] [RY]
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Sutra of the Arrayed Tree (sdong po bkod pa'i mdo, Gandhavyuha). [EMP] [RY]
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Sutra of the Cloud of the Three Jewels; Ratnamegha-sutra; (dkon mchog sprin gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Dense Array (stug po bkod pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Descent to Lanka, Lankavatara Sutra (lang kar gshegs pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Good Aeon (mdo sde bskal bzang); Kangyur 94. [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Heap of Jewels; Ratnakuta-sutra; (dkon mchog brtsegs pa). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Heart of Wisdom (Skt. prajnaparamitahridaya, Tib. mdo shes rab snying po, T 21). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of the King of Samadhi (ting 'dzin rgyal po); expl. of [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the King of Samadhi (ting 'dzin rgyal po'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]
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Sutra of the Lion's Roar of Queen Shrimala [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son (yab sras mjal mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son, (Skt. pitaputra-samagamana, Tib. yab dang sras mjal ba'i mdo, T 60), which is part of the Ratnakuta. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son, (yab sras mjal mdo), [RY]
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Sutra of the Meeting of the Father and Son; Pitaputra-samagamana-sutra; (yab sras mjal ba'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Ornament of the Light of Wisdom; Jñanalokalamkara-sutra; (ye shes snang brgyen gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Power of the Elephant; (glang po'i rtsal gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Sublime Victory Banner (mdo rgyal mtshan dam pa) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra of the Ten Dharmas (Skt. dasadharmaka-sutra, Tib. chos bcu pa'i mdo, T 53). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of the Ten Wheels of Ksitigarbha (sa'i snying po 'khor lo bcu pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]
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Sutra of the Vast Display; Lalitavistara-sutra; (rgya cher rol pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Visit to Lanka; Lankavatara-sutra; (lang par gshegs pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the White Lotus of the Holy Dharma; Saddharma-pundarika-sutra; (dam pa'i chos pad dkar po'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra of the Wise and the Foolish (Skt. damomurkha-nama-sutra, Tib. mdza' blun zhes bya ba'i mdo, T 341) is a sutra that contains fifty-one narratives of the previous lives of the Buddha. For a translation into English, see Frye (1981). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
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Sutra of Unraveling the Intent (dgongs pa nges 'grel). [EMP] [RY]
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Sutra on Blossoming in the Direction of the Great Liberation (thar pa chen po'i phyogs tu rgyas pa'i mdo). [RY]
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Sutra on Magical Perception. [Daki] [RY]
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Sutra on the Application of Mindfulness (dran nyer, mdo dran pa nyer bzhag) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra on the Benefits of Circumambulating Stupas; (mchod rten bskor ba'i phan yon gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]
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SUTRA ON THE FURTHERANCE OF VIRTUE (mdo dge rgyas).[AL] [RY]
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Sutra on the Inconceivable Secret (gsang ba bsam gyis mi khyab pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra on the Recollection of the Three Jewels (dkon mchog rjes dran gyi mdo). [RY]
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Sutra Pitaka (mdo yi sde snod) [LW1] [RY]
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SUTRA PITAKA (mdo'i sde snod). See under 'Sutra.'[AL] [RY]
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Sutra Pitaka {mdo sde}. One of the three Pitakas, containing concise texts spoken by the Buddha. [RY]
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Sutra requested by Crown Jewel; Ratnachudaparipriccha-sutra; (gtsug na rin po ches zhus pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra Requested by Maitreya (byams zhus mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra requested by Maitri Simhanada; (byams pa seng ge'i sgra'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra requested by Sagaramati; Sagaramatiparipriccha-sutra; (blo gros rgya mtshos shus pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]
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Sutra Requested by Sagarmati {blo gros rgya mtshos zhus pa'i mdo}. Name of a sutra. [RY]
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Sutra Requested by Tagmo (stag mos zhus mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra Requested by the King of Dharanis (gzungs kyi rgyal zhus pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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SUTRA REQUESTED BY UNENDING INTELLIGENCE (blo gros mi zad pas zhus pa'i mdo).[AL] [RY]
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Sutra Requested by Wisdom Ocean (ye shes rgya mtsho zhus pa'i mdo). [RY]
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Sutra system (mdo lugs) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutra system (mdo lugs). Refers in this context to the progressive bodhisattva path. [RY]
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Sutra to Inspire Superior Intention (lhag pa'i bsam pa bskul ba'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]
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Sutralamkara (mdo sde rgyan). One of the five works of Maitreya. [RY]
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Sutralamkara. See Ornament of the Sutras [LW1] [RY]
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Sutras (mdo). The discourses and teachings given by Buddha Shakyamuni. [RY]
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sutras of definitive meaning [LW1] [RY]
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Sutrayana - The vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Sutras [RY]
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Sutrayana - The Vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Sutras. [Tarthang]
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Suvarnabhumi - Land to the east of India where Ashoka sent missionaries; often associated with Burma [RY]
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Svabhavakaya. Or Svabhavavikaya. (ngo bo nyid kyi sku). "The Essence Kaya". This is a term for the inseparability of the other three kayas. [Peter Roberts]
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Svabhavikakaya (ngo bo nyid kyi sku). The 'essence body.' Sometimes counted as the fourth kaya, the unity of the first three. [RY]
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Svatantrika (rang rgyud pa). Branch of the [[Madhyamaka]], distinguished by use of conventional forms of philosophical reasoning [RY]
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Svatantrika [[Madhyamaka]] School (dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]
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Svatantrika School Asserting Ultimate Illusion (sgyu ma don dam par 'dod pa'i dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]
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Svatantrika School of Complete Nondwelling (rab tu mi gnas pa'i dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]
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Swayamjnana (rang byung ye shes). "Self-existing" or "self-born wisdom." The name was given by Tulku Urgyen in 1981. Since 1985, 'Rangjung Yeshe' has been used. [RY]
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Swift feet (rkang mgyogs). The yogic art of being able to walk extremely fast, covering a huge distance in a short time, through control over the inner currents of energy. [ZL] [RY]
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syllables (yi ge); audible syllables of utterance; definition of; divisions of; e and vam; explanation of four types according to Longchen Rabjam; final syllables of fruition; function of; identity of; nadi syllables abiding in the body; nature of; the letter 'a'; ultimate syllables of the natural state [LW1] [RY]
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symbol, meaning and sign offerings. Symbol, meaning and sign, is a common division of the aspects of a Tantric deity. They are described towards the end of "General Points that Should be Known", in the longer instruction text "The Oral Instructions of Padmasambhava". Here these three offerings are made to those respective aspects. The offerings and also the praises which follow are found in sequence in the sadhana text. The symbol offering begins "Si-sum tong-ki tor-shong du.." in which all worlds and their beings are offered as a torma. The primordial torma bowl being the three levels of existence: above, upon and below the earth. The meaning offering commences "Tong-sum tong-ki tor-shong du.." in which blazing mount Merus are offered as a torma. The torma-bowl being a thousand billion-world systems, as a Mount Meru is the centre of each world. The sign offering commences "Ban-da bar-way tor-shong du.." in which the flesh, blood, heads and fat of enemies and obstacle-makers is offered as a torma. The torma-bowl being a blazing skull-bowl. [Peter Roberts]
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Symbol, meaning, and sign (brda' don rtags gsum). Three aspects of Vajrayana teachings. [RY]
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Symbol, meaning, and sign (brda' don rtags gsum). Three aspects of Vajrayana teachings. For example, the peaceful and wrathful deities depicted are the symbol. The meaning they symbolize is the enlightened qualities spontaneously present within the buddha nature. The sign is that they naturally manifest during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]
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Symbolic attribute (brda' rtags). For example, a vajra or a wheel. [RY]
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Symbolic Being, samaya sattva, (dam tshig sems dpa'). Visualized image of the deity, with which the Tantric practitioner identifies herself. [RY]
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Symbolic Graded Path Heap of Jewels (dpe'i lam rim rin chen spungs pa), composed by Geshe Potowa (Po to ba), 1031-1105, a great Kadampa Master. Here dpe'i approximately rendered by "symbolic" means that the teachings presented in it are indications leading to the ultimate truth - not yet the ultimate truth itself as it is expounded in the The Ultimate Graded Path Blue Lapis Vase (don gi lam rim be'u bum sngon po), also composed by Potowa. [MR]
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symbolic letters (brda yig). See also sign script, dakini script [LW1] [RY]
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symbolic letters; expl. [LWx] [RY]
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Symbolic wisdom (dpe'i ye shes). The wisdom which is the unity of bliss and emptiness of the third empowerment and which is used to introduce the 'true wisdom' of the fourth empowerment. [RY]
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System of Phakshab, ('phags zhabs kyi bzhes pa), is the tradition of Nagarjuna and his spiritual sons Aryadeva and Chandrakirti. [RY]
 
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'''[[The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity]]''' (Front Cover)
 
'''[[The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity]]''' (Front Cover)

Revision as of 22:51, 12 February 2006

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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Sa chen Kunga Nyingpo (sa chen kun dga' snying po): 1092-1158. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]

Sa chen Kunga Nyingpo, son of Konchog Gyalpo, (sa chen kun dga' snying po): 1092-1158 [MR]

Sabbu land of Shang (shangs kyi zab bu lung) [LW1] [RY]

Sabchu Rinpoche. [RY]

Sabdun Chalag. [RY]

Sabdun Phurba (zab bdun phur ba). One of the major termas revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa the sacred dances of which are performed yearly at Rumtek Monastery in Sikkim. [RY] Sabdun Phurba. [RY]

Sabpa Khordun (zab pa skor bdun). One of the major termas revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sacred commitment (dam tshig), Skt. samaya). See samaya. [ZL] [RY]

Sacred Great Perfection (bka' rdzogs pa chen po). See Dzogchen, Ati Yoga, and Great Perfection. [ZL] [RY]

Sacred Incantation (gzungs), Skt. dharani). A particular type of mantra, usually quite long. [ZL] [RY]

Sacred medicine (sman sgrub). [RY]

Sacred objects related to body, speech and mind (sku gsung thugs rten) - Statues symbolize the enlightened body; books symbolize enlightened speech; and stupas, vajra, bells, and other sacred objects symbolize enlightened mind. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sacred Peace Deity Tantra (zhi ba dam pa lha'i rgyud). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. In the Golden Garland Chronicles this same text is named Peaceful Vajradhatu Tantra (zhi ba rdo rje dbyings kyi rgyud). [ZL] [RY]

sacred places and countries (gnas yul) [LW1] [RY]

sacred places and countries; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Sacred thread, brahma sutra, (tshangs skud). Thread worn over the shoulder by brahmans. [RY]

Sadaprarudita (rtag tu ngu). The 'Ever-Weeping' bodhisattva of a past aeon used as an example for unwavering devotion and perseverance. He is mentioned in the Prajnaparamita scriptures. (see Chapter XXX — Sadaprarudita (RiBa) [RY]

Saddharma Pundarika Sutra (dam chos pad-ma dkar po'i mdo). 'The Sutra of the White Lotus of the Sacred Dharma.' Famous Mahayana scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana (sgrub thabs) lit. 'means of attainment'; special tantric practices for gaining certain spiritual attainments. [RY]

Sadhana (sgrub thabs). 'Means of accomplishment.' Tantric liturgy and procedure for practice usually emphasizing the development stage. The typical sadhana structure involves a preliminary part including the taking of refuge and arousing bodhichitta, a main part involving visualization of a buddha and recitation of the mantra, and a concluding part with dedication of merit to all sentient beings.[Primer] [RY]

Sadhana (sgrub thabs). 'Means of accomplishment.' Tantric liturgy and procedure for practice usually emphasizing the development stage. The typical sadhana structure involves a preliminary part including the taking of refuge and arousing bodhichitta, a main part involving visualization of a buddha and recitation of the mantra, and a concluding part with dedication of merit to all sentient beings. [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana (sgrub thabs). Tantric rite for deity practice, [RY]

sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva) [LW1] [RY]

sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva) [LWx] [RY]

Sadhana centers for practice (nyams len gyi sgrub grva). [RY]

Sadhana of Amitayus and Hayagriva Combined (nye brgyud tshe rta zung 'brel 'chi med dpal gter) is a sadhana that was prophesied in a terma concealed by Guru Padmasambhava in the Magnificent Secret Cave (gzil chen gsang phug) at Tsari and revealed by the great siddha Thangtong Gyalpo; see Compendium of Sadhanas (sgrub thabs kun btus, vol.1, pp. 439). The sadhana texts presented in the Rinchen Terdzö (vol. Tshi, pp.191-204) combine the three traditions of the Canonical Transmission (bka' ma), Spiritual Treasures (gter ma) and Pure Visions (dag snang). On this longevity practice, see J.Gyatso (1981, 142-69). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sadhana of Primordially Pure Innate Nature of Awakened Mind (ye nas dag pa chos nyid byang chub sems kyi sgrub pa). [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana of the Glorious Assemblage of Sugatas (dpal bde gshegs 'dus pa'i sgrub thabs). Text belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga composed by Guru Rinpoche. See also Assemblage of Sugatas. [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana of the Moist Compound of Samaya Substance of the Nine Crescents (zla gam dgu pa dam rdzas rlon sbyor gyi sgrub pa). [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana Section (sgrub sde), of Mahayoga; expl. [LW1] [RY]

Sadhana Section (sgrub sde). One of the two major aspects of Mahayoga scriptures, the other being the Tantra Section. See also 'Assemblage of Sugatas' or Mahayoga. [ZL] [RY]

Sadhana Section (sgrub sde); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Sadhana support (sgrub rten) [RY]

Safeguard-ransoms (glud). A ceremony in which evil spirits are given an effigy of the afflicted person.[EMP] [RY]

Saga Dawa (sa ga zla ba), the fourth month of the Tibetan lunar calendar. It is a special month for practice and performing virtuous actions since the birth, enlightenment, and parinirvana of Buddha Sakyamuni all fall in this month. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sage, the Great mahamuni, (thub pa chen po). Epithet of the Buddha Shakyamuni ('the Sage of the Shakyas'). [RY]

Saha (mi mjed) [LW1] [RY]

Saha (mi mjed); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Saha (Skt., mi mjed). The name of our present world system. It means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. [RY]

Saha {mi mjed}. World of Patient Endurance. The name of this present universe, where the emotions are so strong that beings cannot bear them. [RY]

Saha world (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten gyi khams). The name of our present world system. Saha means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also mean 'undivided' because the karmas and kleshas, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated.[EMP] [RY]

Saha World (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten) Our known world system; the 'World of Endurance,' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also means 'Undivided' because the karmas and disturbing emotions, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated. [RY] SAHA WORLD (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten) Our known world system; the 'World of Endurance,' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. Saha can also mean 'Undivided' because the karmas and disturbing emotions, causes and effects, are not separately divided or differentiated.[AL] [RY]

Saha world-system (mi mjed kyi 'jig rten gyi khams). The name of our present world system. Saha means 'enduring' because the sentient beings here endure unbearable suffering. [ZL] [RY]

Saha; [LWx] [RY]

Sa-hor - Kingdom associated with the early transmission of the Tantra; home of Santaraksita; also spelled Za-hor or Sahora. [Tarthang]

Sahor / Sa hor - () Kingdom associated with the early transmission of the Tantra; home of Shantarakshita; also spelled Zahor or Sahora [RY]

Sahor. [Daki] [RY]

Saicho - Founder of the Japanese Tendai school and the Tendai center on Mt. Hiei [RY]

Saicho - Founder of the Japanese Tendai school and the Tendai Center on Mt. Hiei. [Tarthang]

Sakya - The throne-holders Ngakchang Kunga Gyaltsen (sngags 'chang kun dga' rgyal mtshan) and Gonpo Ngodrup Pelbar (mgon po dngos grub dpal 'bar) were the two youngest among the four sons of Wangdu Nyingpo (dbang 'dus snying po, the thirty-third throne-holder of Sakya, 1765-1806). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sakya (sa skya). One of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism. It was established in the eleventh century by Drogmi Lotsawa ('brog mi lo tsa ba), a disciple of the Indian master Virupa. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Sakya / Sa skya - Tibetan school of Buddhism established in the eleventh century by 'Brog mi [RY]

Sakya / The sa skya school traces its lineage to 'Brog mi shakya ye shes (b. 1147), who studied with the Mahasiddha Virupa. Five great masters continued the lineage: Kun dga' snying po, bSod rnams rtse mo, Grags pa rgyal mtshan, Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (Sa skya Pandita), and 'Gro mgon chos rgyal ('Phags pa). The Sa skya tradition emphasizes both study and practice, especially favoring the Hevajra Tantra. [RY]

Sakya Chogden, Serdog Panchen (gser mdog pan chen sa kya mchog ldan) : 1428-1507 [MR]

Sakya Chogden, Serdog Panchen (sa kya mchog ldan gser mdog pan chen) : 1428-1507 [MR]

Sakya Gongma. [RY]

Sakya Pandita (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan), grand son of Kunga Nyingpo: 1182-1251 [MR]

Sakya Pandita (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan): 1182-1251. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]

Sakya Pandita / Sa skya Pandita - Thirteenth century Tibetan master and scholar who exercised political power on behalf of the Mongols; also known as Sa pan [RY]

Sakya Pandita {sa pan}. (1182-1251). Important Sakyapa master, also called Kunga Gyaltsen. [RY]

Sakya Pandita, Kunga Gyaltsen (sa skya pan di ta kun dga' rgyal mtshan, 1182-1251), wrote the Distinctive Features of the Three Vows (sdom gsum rab 'byed). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sakya Pandita; [LWx] [RY]

Sakya School [LWx] [RY]

Sakya tradition of Khon. [RY]

Sakya Trichen Ngawang Thuthob Wangdrag: 1900-1950 [MR]

Sakya. [RY]

Sakya; (sa skya) The seat of the Sakya school, Sakya was founded by Konchog Gyalpo of the powerful Khön family, in 1073. Its main temple, the impressive Great Miraculously Appeared Temple was erected in 1268, and it is the only building among the over hundred temples of Sakya's monastic complex which survived the Chinese destruction. [MR]

Sakya; Monastery [LW1] [RY]

Sakyapa (sa skya pa). A follower of the Sakya lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. [RY]

Sakyapas {sa kya pa}. One of the schools of the new tradition, founded by Khon Konchog Gyalpo (1034-1102). [RY]

Saleh Ö (gsal le 'od), the famous female disciple of Jetsun Milarepa. The verses quoted here show slight differences from those found in most editions of the Hundred Thousand Songs (mgur 'bum). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Salnang of Ba [LW1] [RY]

Salty River Sutra (Tib. ba tshwa can gyi chu klung gi mdo) is not found in the list of content of Derge Kangyur (sde dge bka' 'gyur). This declaration may be one of those verses which are found as quotes in translated commentaries, whereas the original sutras to which they belong have been lost, or were never translated into Tibetan. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Salu Sprout Sutra (sa lu ljang ba'i mdo) [LWx] [RY]

Samadhi (ting (nge) 'dzin). Concentration for the mind on a single object. [RY]

Samadhi (ting nge 'dzin). 'Adhering to the continuity of evenness.' A state of undistracted concentration or meditative absorption which in the context of Vajrayana can refer to either the development stage or the completion stage. [AL] [RY]

samadhi (ting nge 'dzin); doors; four; mundane; of dhyana; of noble beings; of the stream of Dharma; of united means and knowledge; supreme training; that tames all the hordes of Mara; that tames the hordes of Mara; unconditioned virtue; undefiled aggregate of; vajralike [LW1] [RY]

Samadhi {ting nge 'dzin}. State of deep concentration. [RY]

Samadhi of Courageous Movement (dpa' bar 'gro ba'i ting nge 'dzin). The surangama samadhi described in the Surangama Sutra. [RY]

Samadhi of Magical Illusion (sgyu 'phrul gyi ting nge 'dzin). [RY]

Samadhi of suchness (de bzhin nyid kyi ting nge 'dzin). The first of the 'three samadhis.' See Light of Wisdom, Vol. 2, pgs 88-89. [RY]

Samadhi of Suchness. The first of the 'Three Samadhis.' The samadhi of suchness, of illumination and of the seed-syllable. The samadhi of suchness is to rest in the composure of the innate emptiness of all phenomena, as pointed out by one's root master, or simply to imagine that all things are empty like space. The samadhi of illumination is let natural compassion manifest like sunlight illuminating the sky, or simply to generate compassion for all the beings who fail to realize the nature of things. The samadhi of the seed-syllable is the innate unity of emptiness and compassion manifesting in the form of a syllable that is the 'seed' or source from which the deity and the entire mandala will appear during the practice. These three samadhis are the indispensible framework for the development stage of Vajrayana practice. In his Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo, Padmasambhava says, "The main part begins with the profound and vast samadhis Which purify the manner of death, bardo, and rebirth: The great emptiness space of suchness is pure like the sky. Rest evenly in this space of the undivided two truths. Emanate the magic of compassion, an all-illuminating cloud of awareness, filling the space, radiant yet without fixation. The single mudra in the manner of a subtle syllable Is the causal seed which produces everything. Keep this changeless wisdom essence, manifests in space, one-pointedly in mind and bring its vivid presence to perfection. For more details, see Light of Wisdom, Vol. 2, pgs 88-89.[Primer] [RY]

Samadhi of the first dhyana (bsam gtan dang po'i ting nge 'dzin). See 'first dhyana.' [RY]

Samadhi of the Majestic Lion (seng ge bsgyings pa'i ting nge 'dzin). Described in the 'Flower Adornment Sutra,' Vol. III, Shambhala Publications. [RY]

samadhi of the stream of Dharma [LWx] [RY]

samadhi-doors [LWx] [RY]

Samadhisattva. Meditation Deity. (ting 'dzin sems dpa'). This refers to what is within the heart of the deity or insignia within one's own heart.The innermost of the succession of "sattvas" that are visualised. It is usually in the form of a seed syllable. [Peter Roberts]

Samaja ('dus pa) [LW1] [RY]

Samaja Root Tantra ('dus pa rtsa rgyud) [LW1] [RY]

Samaja Root Tantra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Samaja; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Samantabhadra (kun tu bzan gpo; all good) The primordial, dharmakaya buddha, blue in color and naked, often depicted in consort with Prajna, who is white in color. [Rain of Wisdom]

Samantabhadra (Kun tu bzang po) lit. 'All-good'; the Adibuddha who through ceaseless meditation gives rise to the Dhyanibuddhas; representation of the ultimate nature of reality. [RY]

Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po), the "Ever Perfect" primordial Buddha. In the primordial universal ground, there are neither sentient beings, nor Buddhas; neither ignorance, nor enlightenment. It is a state of natural, unchanging perfection beyond conditions and concepts. When the first manifestation of phenomena arises from the primordial ground, to recognize that this arising is the display of one's own awareness leads instantaneously to the primordial Buddhahood of Samantabhadra. Not recognizing this to be the case, and taking phenomena and beings to be real entities distinct from oneself, leads instantaneously to the ignorance of sentient beings. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po). The 'Ever-excellent One.' 1) The primordial dharmakaya buddha. 2) The bodhisattva Samantabhadra used as the example for the perfection of increasing an offering infinitely. [ZL] [RY]

SAMANTABHADRA (kun tu bzang po). The 'Ever-excellent One.' 1) The primordial dharmakaya buddha. 2) The bodhisattva Samantabhadra used as the example for the perfection of increasing an offering infinitely. [AL] [RY]

Samantabhadra (kun tu bzang po); enlightenment in the original ground of liberation; Original Protector; the bodhisattva [LW1] [RY]

Samantabhadra {kun tu bzang po}. The original Buddha who has never fallen into delusion. He is the Dharmakaya Buddha represented as a darkblue naked figure without ornaments in union with his consort Samantabhadri, symbolizing the unity of awareness and emptiness. It can also mean the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra, one of the eight close sons of the Buddha. Through the power of his concentration he miraculously multiplied the offerings he made. [RY]

Samantabhadra is the Bodhisattva who made boundless offerings by emanating innumerable bodies like himself, each of which made offerings filling the sky. They in turn emanated innumerable bodies that also made offerings and so on, ad infinitum. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Samantabhadra offering cloud (kun bzang mchod sprin). An immense cloud of offering as emanated by the bodhisattva Samantabhadra. [RY]

Samantabhadra; enlightenment in the original ground of liberation; expl.; the bodhisattva; [LWx] [RY]

Samantabhadramitabha. Samantabhadramitabha is a composite name of Samantabhadra, the Dharmakaya Buddha, and Amitabha. Here they are inseparable as a naked blue Buddha. [Peter Roberts]

Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo) [LW1] [RY]

Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo), the consort of the primordial Buddha Samantabhadra, the Ever-Perfect (see Author's Introduction, note 3). Their union symbolizes the inseparability of the phenomenal world and emptiness. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo). See under Ever-excellent Lady. [ZL] [RY]

Samantabhadri (kun tu bzang mo). The consort of Samantabhadra. [RY]

Samantabhadri (Kun tu bzang po) lit. 'the All-good'; the mother of all the Buddhas of the three times; the female or prajna (wisdom) counterpart of the Adibuddha Samantabhadra. [RY]

Samantabhadri Tantra of the Sun of the Luminous Expanse (kun tu bzang mo klong gsal nyi ma'i rgyud). [ZL] [RY]

Samantabhadri. [Daki] [RY]

Samantabhadri; [LWx] [RY]

Samaya (dam tshig). 1) The sacred pledge, precepts or commitment of Vajrayana practice. Many details exists, but the samayas essentially consist of outwardly, maintaining harmonious relationship with the vajra master and one's Dharma friends and, inwardly, not straying from the continuity of the practice. 2) At the end of a chapter, the single word 'samaya' means is an oath that what has been stated is true. [RY]

samaya (dam tshig); expl. of use at the end of an instruction; retaining empowerment; seal; vajra [LW1] [RY]

Samaya {dam tshig}. Precepts taken in the Secret Mantra Vajrayana. [RY]

Samaya being (dam tshig sems dpa'), (dam tshig pa). The deity visualized by oneself. [RY]

Samaya beings and wisdom beings (dam ye), dam tshig pa dang ye shes pa). The deity visualized by oneself and the innate deity abiding in dharmadhatu. [RY]

Samaya dakinis. [RY]

Samaya mudra (dam tshig gi phyag rgya). One of the four mudras. [RY]

Samaya perverters (dam sri). A certain malevolent spirit. [RY]

Samayasattva (dam tshig sems dpa') See 'samaya being.' [RY]

Samayasattva. Commitment-Deity. Skt: Samayasattva. Tib: dam.tshig sems.dpa'. Though the Sanskrit word is the same, there is a differentiation in Tibetan into the above and dam.tshig.pa. This latter is the deity that oneself creates with one's own mind, due to the commitment that one has made following which the ye-shes-pa (Jnanasattava "Wisdom Deity"), the actual deity will be invited. The Damtsig sempa that we have here however, is a differentiation of aspects of the visualisation of the deity. The visualisation of oneself as the deity is termed the commitment-deity, (Samayasattva or Damtsig Sempa), and the deity visualised in one's heart is termed the Wisdom Deity, (Jnanasattva or Yeshe Sempa). Though the terms in Sanskrit, and here in English, are identical, they must be understood to have quite different meanings. [Peter Roberts]

Samayoga Tantra (rgyud mnyam sbyor) [LW1] [RY]

Samayoga Tantra (rgyud mnyam sbyor); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Samayoga Tantra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Sambhogakaya - An aspect or 'embodiment' of the Buddha that manifests to Bodhisattvas having attained a certain stage of realization [RY]

Sambhogakaya - An aspect or 'embodiment' of the Buddha that manifests to Bodhisattvas having attained a certain stage of realization. [Tarthang]

Sambhogakaya - see Three Kayas. [RY]

sambhogakaya (long sku). See three kayas; yidams [LW1] [RY]

Sambhogakaya (longs (spyod rdzogs pa'i) sku, longs spyod). 'Enjoyment Body' the Body endowed with the thirty-two Marks and eighty minor signs that a buddha displays to Arya Bodhisattvas in a Pure Land, teaching the Mahayana until the end of samsara. [RY]

Sambhogakaya (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). See 'three kayas'.[Primer] [RY]

Sambhogakaya (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). The 'body of perfect enjoyment.' In the context of the 'five kayas of fruition,' sambhogakaya is the semi-manifest form of the buddhas endowed with the 'five perfections' of perfect teacher, retinue, place, teaching and time which is perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the ten levels. [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY]

SAMBHOGAKAYA (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku). The 'body of perfect enjoyment.' In the context of the 'five kayas of fruition,' sambhogakaya is the semi-manifest form of the buddhas endowed with the 'five perfections' of perfect teacher, retinue, place, teaching and time which is perceptible only to bodhisattvas on the ten levels. [AL] [RY]

Sambhogakaya {longs spyod rdzogs pa'i sku}. Body of perfect enjoyment. This is the spontaneously luminous aspect of Buddhahood perceptible to realized beings. [RY]

Sambhogakaya attire (longs spyod rdzogs pa'i chas). The five silken garments and the eight jewel ornaments. [RY]

Sambhogakaya costume. The sambhogakaya costume consists of eight kinds of jewellery and five silk garments: A crown, earrings, a short necklace, a middle-length necklace, a very long necklace, armlets, bracelets and anklets. There are variations, for example, a belt may be listed instead of the armlets. There are variant lists of the silk garments, sometimes differing in the interpretation of what the clothing referred to in the Tantras are. The Tibetan pictorial representations of deities has developed its own iconography, which does not necessarily match the descriptions given in the actual Tantras. The colours of the garments can vary with specific deities. 1.Crown-ribbons of five colours. 2.A large blue silk ribbon hanging from the rear of the crown. 3.A shawl of white silk with gold embroidery. 4.A very short green blouse the hem of which is above the breasts. 5.A skirt of dark maroon decorated with parallel lines of gold, or with bands of rainbow colours. If the blue crown-ribbon is counted as one with the other crown-ribbons, then the fifth garment is enumerated as a silken belt next to the precious belt, that is knotted at the front, its two ends hanging loosely. The shawl is sometimes interpreted as being the blouse, and the wide blue ribbon at the rear of the crown is identified as a long silken scarf. However, the above description would appear to be more precise. [Peter Roberts]

Sambhogakaya Great Compassion (longs sku thugs rje chen po). Same as Avalokiteshvara. [ZL] [RY]

Sambhogakaya Great Compassionate One (longs sku thugs rje chen po). Same as Avalokiteshvara. [RY]

Sambhogakaya luminosity (longs sku'i 'od gsal). The luminosity during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

sambhogakaya See trikaya. [Rain of Wisdom]

Sambhuti (sam bhu ti) is the Exposition Tantra of the Two Discernments (brtag gnyis bshad rgyud), meaning "union" (kha sbyor), or "perfectly united" (yang dag par kha sbyor). [RY]

Sambhuti [LW1] [RY]

Sambhuti Tantra (Skt.). [EMP] [RY]

Sambhuti; expl.; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Sameness of space and wisdom (dbyings dang ye shes mnyam pa nyid). [RY]

Samkhya [LWx] [RY]

Sammatiya. prominent Hinayanist school, to which in the seventh century more than a quarter of the Buddhist monks in India were counted as belonging. They were notorious for their heretical, 'Personalist' views and often their bigotry and moral depravity. [RY]

Sampa Lhündrub (bsam pa lhun grub). A supplication to Guru Rinpoche as well as a terma of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sampa Lhündrub (bsam pa lhun grub); inner sadhana; Tukdrub Yishin Norbu [LW1] [RY]

Sampa Lhündrub Yishin Norbu. [RY]

Sampa Lhundrub, the inner practice. A supplication to Guru Rinpoche as well as a terma of Chokgyur Lingpa.[Primer] [RY]

Sampa Lhündrub; inner sadhana (bsam pa lhun grub) [LWx] [RY]

Samsara ('khor (ba); also bhava, srid ). The state of continually having to take rebirth under the control of karma and defilements. [RY]

Samsara ('khor ba). 'Cyclic existence,' 'vicious circle' or 'round' of birth and death and rebirth within the six realms of existence, characterized by suffering, impermanence, and ignorance. The state of ordinary sentient beings fettered by ignorance and dualistic perception, karma and disturbing emotions. Ordinary reality, an endless cycle of frustration and suffering generated as the result of karma. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]

samsara ('khor ba); causes of; characteristics of; conditions for; creator of; origin according to Dzogchen . (Ref. Light of Wisdom, vol. 1 pg. 311) [LW1] [RY]

Samsara {'khor ba}. Cyclic existence where beings go around from one birth to another through the karmic force of their actions [RY]

Samsara and Nirvana ('khor 'das). Pure and impure phenomena. [RY]

Samsaric ('khor ba'i). Of or pertaining to samsara; worldly, mundane, profane. [ZL] [RY]

Samsaric existence ('khor ba'i srid pa). See 'samsara.' [RY]

Samten Gyamtso (bsam gtan rgya mtsho). The root guru of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. [RY] Samten Gyamtso Namkha Drimey (bsam gtan rgya mtsho nam mkha' dri med). See Samten Gyatso. [RY]

Samten Gyatso Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Samten Kangsar. [RY]

Samten Palpa of Gomo: 1291-1366 [MR]

Samten Palpa of Gomo: 1291-1366. [RY]

Samvarodaya (sdom 'byung) [LW1] [RY]


Samvarodaya (sdom 'byung); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Samye (bsam yas). The temple built by King Trisong Deutsen and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. [RY]

Samye (bsam yas). The wondrous temple complex built by King Trisong Deutsen (790-844) and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche. A major center of the early transmission. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. It is also known as Glorious Samye, the Unchanging and Spontaneously Accomplished Temple. [ZL] [RY]

Samye (bsam yas). The wondrous temple complex, modeled after the Indian monastery Odantapuri, built by King Trisong Deutsen (790-844) and consecrated by Guru Rinpoche in 814. A major center of the early transmission of Buddhism in Tibet. It is situated in Central Tibet close to Lhasa. It is also known as Glorious Temple of Samye, the Unchanging and Spontaneously Fulfillment of Boundless Wishes. Its three stories are of Indian, Chinese and Tibetan designs. See The Lotus-born (Shambhala Publications).[AL] [RY]

Samye (bsam yas); description of; middle story; Unchanging and Spontaneously Perfected Temple [LW1] [RY]

Samye / bSam yas - Tibetan temple and monastery founded by Padmasambhava, Khri srong lde btsan, and Shantarakshita; center of the early transmission [RY]

Samye caught fire: 1816 [MR]

Samye Chimphu - The place where Guru Padmasambhava gave the first empowerment (abhiseka) in Tibet to King Trisong Detsen and to seven other disciples, each of whom was entrusted with the practice upon one the Eight Herukas of the Eight Canons of Accomplishment (sgrub pa bka' brgyad). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Samye Chimphu (bsam yas chims phu). A mountain retreat situated above the temple of Samye. [RY]

Samye Chimphu (bsam yas chims phu). The sacred place of Padmasambhava's speech. A mountain retreat situated four hours walk above Samye. During the last twelve centuries numerous great masters have meditated in the caves at this hermitage. [ZL] [RY]

SAMYE CHIMPHU (bsam yas chims phu). The sacred place of Padmasambhava's speech. A mountain retreat situated four hours walk above Samye. During the last twelve centuries numerous great masters have meditated in the caves at this hermitage.[AL] [RY]

Samye debate: 792? [MR]

Samye is completed : 814 [MR]

Samye Mingyur Lhungyi Drubpa (bsam yas mi 'gyur lhun gyis grub pa). Samye temple, established by Padmasambhava, King trisong Deutsen and Shantarakshita. It's building commenced in 762, ended in 766 and it was consecrated in 767. [Peter Roberts]

Samye, monastery;, (bsam yas). The first monastery built in Tibet, by Guru Padmasambhava, where the Buddhist canonical scriptures were translated into Tibetan, and where Guru Rinpoche gave many profound teachings and initiations. [MR]

Samye; description of; [LWx] [RY]

Sanctuary of the Changeless Supreme Teaching (bstan mchog 'gyur med gling) [LW1] [RY]

Sandal Grove charnel ground (tsan dan tshal gyi dur khrod). The Golden Garland Chronicles (p. 179) describes this place as: 'The eminent celestial sacred place of the vidyadharas, the wild jungle which is a crossroad on the secret path of great bliss.' It is also counted among the traditional Eight Charnel Grounds. [ZL] [RY]

Sandhi Vyakarana (dgongs pa lung ston) [LW1] [RY]

Sangdak Dorje Bechön (gsang bdag rdo rje be con) [LW1] [RY]

Sangdak Dorje Bechön; [LWx] [RY]

Sangdok Palri (zangs mdog dpal ri). The Glorious Copper colored Mountain, the pure land of Guru Rinpoche situated on the south-western continent of Camara (rnga g.yab). [RY]

Sangdok Palri, the Glorious Copper Colored Mountain. [Daki] [RY]

Sangha - the community of those practicing the teachings of the Buddha, united by their vision and their commitment to the path. In order to lay the foundation for Dharma practice, various forms of discipline are undertaken. Eight traditional kinds of Sangha exist: bhikshu and bhikshuni: fully ordained monks and nuns: Shramanara and shramani: novices who have taken preliminary vows; shiksamana: aspirants too young to join the community but who follow special rules; upavasta: laymen of laywomen who take monk's vows for a certain limited time; upasaka and upasika: laymen and laywomen who practice Buddhist teachings follow five precepts: not to kill, not to steal, not to lie, not to take intoxicating substances, not to engage in sexual misconduct. [RY]

Sangha (dge 'dun). 'Community, congregation'. The Sangha in which one takes Refuge is the Community of Saints, or Arya Beings - those of the Hinayana, the Shravaka and Pratyeka-buddha Aryas; those of the Mahayana, the Arya Bodhisattvas and Buddhas; and those of the Vajrayana, the Heroes, Dakinis, etc. This is Ultimate Sangha; Relative Sangha is the community of ordained monks and nuns, which should be honored as representing the actual Sangha Refuge just as Buddha images and sacred texts should be revered as representing the actual Buddha and Dharma. [RY]

Sangha (dge 'dun). The community of practitioners usually the fully ordained monks and nuns or the ngakpas. The Noble Sangha means those who have achieved the path of seeing among the five paths and therefore are liberated from samsara. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]

Sangha (dge 'dun); actual and resembling; expl. qualities; fourfold, of the lesser vehicles; three qualities of freedom; three qualities of knowledge; triple; two aspects and six qualities of [LW1] [RY]

Sangha {dge 'dun}. The followers of the Buddha who can guide others on the path. It refers to arhats, Bodhisattvas, and ordained monks and nuns etc. In a broader sense it refers to all practitionars of the Buddhist teachings. [RY]

Sangha; actual and resembling; expl. qualities; three qualities of freedom; three qualities of knowledge; two aspects and six qualities of [LWx] [RY]

Sanghamitra - Ashoka's daughter and a nun; brought a branch of the Bodhi tree as an emissary to Sri Lanka [RY]

Sanglingma (zangs gling ma). The name of the text used for this translation of Padmasambhava's life story. See Translator's Preface. [ZL] [RY]

Sanglingma Life Story by Nyang Ral Nyima Özer (1124-1192). The first known terma biography; 41 chapters, 202 pages. Tibetan title: slob dpon pad-ma 'byung gnas kyi skyes rabs chos 'byung nor bu'i phreng ba, rnam thar zangs gling ma'o. Included by Jamgön Kongtrül the First in the Rinchen Terdzö. The Sanglingma exists also in a longer version of 286 pages. This version, also revealed by Lord Nyang, is so far unpublished but is found at the National Archives, Kathmandu, Nepal. Tibetan title: u rgyan gu ru padma 'byung gnas kyi rnam thar 'bring po zangs gling mar grags pa. The Sanglingma is also present in an extensive two volume version which was banned in Central Tibet due to some clear and damaging predictions about certain ministers' involvement in the decline of Buddhism in Tibet in the twentieth century. This version, 1260 pages, was found in the Mustang region of Nepal and is also available at the National Archives, Kathmandu, Nepal. [ZL] [RY]

Sang-ngak Lamrim Radiant Jewel Lamp (gsang sngags lam rim rin chen gsal ba'i sgron me) [LW1] [RY]

Sang-ngak Lamrim Radiant Jewel Lamp (gsang sngags lam rim rin chen gsal ba'i sgron me); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Sang-ngak Phodrang (gsang sngags pho brang). The seat of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sang-ngak Phodrang [LW1] [RY]

Sang-ngak Rinpoche (gsang sngags rin po che). The brother of Samten Gyatso. [RY]

Sangri Kharmar; (zangs ri mkhar kmar) The Red Citadel (Kharmar) is thus called because is was built upon a red rock, at the southern extremity of the Copper Mountain (Sangri), overloooking the northern banks of the Tsangpo river. On the cliff-face to the west of the temple (which was destroyed by the Chinese) is Machik Labdrön's (1055-1149) meditation cave. [MR]

sangs rgyas gsang ba - wo1 254 life story [RY]

Sangthik Korsum (gsang thig skor gsum). Termas by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sangwa Yeshe cycle of Olkha ('ol kha'i gsang ba ye shes), the sixteen-volume cycle of teachings focused on the dakini "Secret Wisdom" (gsang ba ye shes) according to the visions of Lelung Jedrung Shepai Dorje (sle lung rje drung bzhad pa'i rdo rje, b. 1697) from Olkha, based on the terma revelations of Minling Terchen (see chap.1, note 38). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sangwa Yeshe of Tertön Dechen Gyalpo, see chap.10, note 52. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sangwey Nyingpo (gsang ba'i snying po) [LWx] [RY]

Sangwey Nyingpo (gsang ba'i snying po). See Guhyagarbha Tantra [LW1] [RY]

Sangye Gyatso: 1653-1705. [RY]

Sangye Lama [LW1] [RY]

Sangye Lingpa (1340-1396). [Daki] [RY]

Sangye Lingpa (sangs rgyas gling pa). (1340-1396). A reincarnation of the second son of King Trisong Deutsen; a major tertön and revealer of the Lama Gongdü cycle in 13 volumes. Sangye Lingpa means 'Sanctuary of Awakening.'[AL] [RY]

Sangye Lingpa (sangs rgyas gling pa)1340-1396 [MR]

Sangye Lingpa [LW1] [RY]

Sangye Lingpa [LWx] [RY]

Sangye Nyenpa Drupthob Tashi Paljor: [MR]

Sangye Nyenpa Drupthob Tashi Paljor:. [RY]

Sangye Nyenpa. [RY]

Sangye On (dhar ma seng ge sangs rgyas dbon): 1177-1237 [MR]

Sangye Yeshe (sangs rgyas ye shes). See Nupchen Sangye Yeshe. [RY]

Sangye Yeshe of Nub (gnubs sangs rgyas ye shes). One of the twenty-five disciples of Padmasambhava, he was the chief recipient of the Anu Yoga teachings as well as the Yamantaka of Mahayoga. In addition to Guru Rinpoche, his other teachers were Traktung Nagpo and Chögyal Kyong of India, Vasudhara of Nepal, and Chetsen Kye from the country of Drusha. He visited India and Nepal seven times. When the evil king Langdarma attempted to destroy Buddhism in Tibet, Sangye Yeshe instilled fear in the king by causing an enormous scorpion, the size of nine yaks, to magically appear by a single gesture of his right hand. Through this, Langdarma lost the courage to persecute the Vajrayana sangha who dressed in white robes and kept long hair. Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche is considered one of his reincarnations. Sangye Yeshe means 'Buddha Wisdom.' [AL] [RY]

San-Iun - Chinese Buddhist school based on the Madhyamaka teachings brought by Kumarajiva. [Tarthang]

San-lun - Chinese Buddhist school based on the Madhyamaka teachings brought by Kumarajiva [RY] Sanskrit (legs sbyar gyi skad). The language of ancient India. [RY]

Santideva, (shi ba lha) one of the eighty-four mahasiddha of India. He composed the famous Bodhicaryavatara (byang chub sems dpa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa), "Engaging in the Bodhicitta's Deeds", and the Siksasamuccaya (bslab pa kun las btus pa), the "Collected Precepts" two major texts describing the ideal and practice of a bodhisattva. [MR]

sara; expl. of meaning [LW1] [RY]

sara; expl.; expl. of meaning [LWx] [RY]

Saraha - The sage Rahulabhadra, abbot of Nalanda one of the 84 Siddhas [RY]

Saraha - The sage Rahulabhadra, abbot of Nalanda; one of the 84 Siddhas. [Tarthang]

Saraha (sa ra ha). One of the mahasiddhas of India and a master in the Mahamudra lineage. See The Royal Songs of Saraha, Shambhala Publications. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Saraha [LW1] [RY]

Saraha {sa ra ha}. Indian mahasiddha who was the author of three cycles of dohas. [RY]

Saraha; quotation by [LWx] [RY]

Sarasvati - goddess of Euphony and patron of the arts and sciences; early known as goddess of sacred river in northern India and as the goddess of speech and learning; traditionally regarded in India as the source of the Sanskrit language and Devanagri letters. [RY]

Sarasvati (dbyangs can lha mo) [LW1] [RY]

Sarasvati (dbyangs can ma). Vedic goddess of a now dried-up river, who became patron deity of poetry, music, science and all the creative arts, and in much this form was adopted into the Buddhist pantheon, with Manjushri as Her consort. [RY]

Sarasvati; [LWx] [RY]

Sariputra - One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom. [Tarthang]

Sariputra, one of the two disciples always depicted at the side of Buddha Sakyamuni. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sarma (gsar ma). See the New Schools. [RY]

Sarma / gSar ma - The new tradition or new Tantras associated with the second transmission of teachings to Tibet, starting in the eleventh century [RY]

Sarma / The gSar ma is the general heading of all the Tibetan schools of Buddhism which developed after the 10th century. [RY]

Sarma and Nyingma (gsar rnying). See also Sarma Schools, Nyingma School; tantras [LW1] [RY]

Sarma and Nyingma tantras [LWx] [RY]

Sarma and Nyingma; [LWx] [RY]

Sarma Schools (gsar ma) [LW1] [RY]

Sarma Schools (gsar ma). 'New Schools.' The New Schools are Kagyü, Sakya, and Gelug as well as Shijey and Chö, Jordruk, Shangpa Kagyü, and Nyendrup (the Kalachakra system). [ZL] [RY]

Sarma Schools of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags gsar ma). See New Schools. [RY]

Sarma Schools; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Sarnath [LW1] [RY]

Sarvabuddha Samayoga (sangs rgyas mnyam sbyor). 'Equalizing Buddhahood.' A Mahayoga scripture. Three tantras of this name are found in Vol. MA of the Nyingma Gyübum. Sometimes counted among the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras as the tantra of enlightened body. [ZL] [RY]

Sarvabuddha Samayoga. See Samayoga Tantra [LW1] [RY]

Sarvastavadin [LW1] [RY]

Sarvastavadin [LWx] [RY]

Sarvastivada (thams cad yod par smra ba). 'pan-realism', a prominent and influential Hinayanist school named after their assertion that a dharma exists during all time, wandering from the future to the present when it seems to arise and transferred into the past when it perishes. [RY]

Sarvastivadin - One of the original eighteen schools, noted for study of Abhidharma; forerunners of the Vaibhashikas [RY]

Sa-ter. [RY]

satsas. Satsa. Sanskrit: saccha. These are small images of stupas or deities, made quickly by pressing clay into a mould. This way, one can accumulate the good karma of creating a great number of images in a short time. [Peter Roberts]

Sattva-paryanka (sems dpa'i skyil krung). Cross-legged sitting posture with the shins flat on the ground forming virtually a straight line, right ankle on top of the left. [RY]

sattvasana (sems dpa'i skyil krung) A type of cross legged meditation posture in which the legs are very loosely crossed, the right leg being slightly extended out in front. [Rain of Wisdom]

Sautantrika; expl. view [LWx] [RY]

Sautrantika - Second major philosophical school, one branch of which was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma. [Tarthang]

Sautrantika (mdo sde pa)- Second major philosophical school, one branch of which was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma [RY]

Sautrantika (mdo sde pa). A Hinayana school of philosophy and one of the four major Buddhist School. [RY]

Sautrantika (mdo sde pa). A hinayana school of philosophy and the second of the four major Buddhist Schools known for its reliance on the sutras rather than Abhidharma.[EMP] [RY]

Sautrantika School (mdo sde pa); expl. View; viewpoint of the noble potential [LW1] [RY]

Sautrantika School [LWx] [RY]

Sautrantika. A Hinayana school of philosophy and second of the four major Buddhist Schools. One of its branchess was known for its reliance on the Sutras instead of Abhidharma[Primer] [RY]

Sautrantika; expl.; viewpoint of the noble potential [LWx] [RY]

Sciences, the five; vidya sthana, (rig pa'i gnas lnga). Grammar, dialectics, medicine, arts and craft, and religious philosophy. [RY]

Scriptural transmission (lung). Same as 'reading transmission.' [RY]

Scripture (mdo), (lung). In the context of this book, a scripture belonging to the category of Anu Yoga or Ati Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture in Eight Chapters (lung bam po brgyad pa). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. Vol. LA of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture of the Compendium of Knowledge (kun 'dus rig pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Scripture of the Compendium of Knowledge (kun 'dus rig pa'i mdo); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Scripture of the Embodiment of the Realization of All Buddhas. (sangs rgyas thams cad dgongs pa 'dus pa'i mdo). The Anu Yoga scripture renowned as 'Gongdü'. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture of the Great Assemblage ('dus pa mdo). [EMP] [RY]

Scripture of the Great Prophesy of Awakened Mind (sems lung chen po'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture of the Play of the Cuckoo Bird of the Charnel Ground (dur khrod khu byug rol pa'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture of the Wisdom Wheel of Awesome Lightning (ye shes rngam pa glog gi 'khor lo'i mdo). An Anu Yoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Scripture on Discernment (lung rnam 'byed) [LW1] [RY]

Scripture on Discernment (lung rnam 'byed); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Scripture(lung) (mdo). In the context of this book, a scripture belonging to the category of Anu Yoga or Ati Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Scriptures (lung). See 'tantras, scriptures, and instructions.' [RY]

Scriptures and realization (lung dang rtogs pa). Authoritative scriptures and the realization of the Dharma in the minds of noble beings. [ZL] [RY]

Scriptures of the Kadampas, Father and Sons (bka' gdams glegs bam pha chos bu chos): A collection of instructions, questions and answers, stories, songs, prophecies, etc., of Lord Atisha (the father), and his disciples (the sons). Includes 49 sections, 26 for the Father's Dharma, 22 for the Sons' Dharma, and 1 section of miscellanii. The Father Dharma comprises: 1) the byang chub sems dpa'i nor bu phreng ba, a short text in verse on the Bodhisattva Path by Atisha; 2) the 23 sections of the zhus lan nor bu'i phreng ba, authored by Atisha: a series of instructions to Drom Tönpa Gyalwai Jungney and of spiritual conversions between Atisha and Drom. 3) The Sons' Dharma comprises: Collected by legs pa'i shes rab. Lhassa prints, and 2 volume edition (435 pp. and 427 pp.) by Kalsang Lhundup, Buddhist Temple, Vanarasi, 1973-74. (bka' gdams glegs bam, Collected Teachings and Stories of Lord Atisha and His Disciples on the Precious Practice fo the Bka' Gdams Pa Buddhism). [MR]

Se (sad) mi, mi dun ordained: 767/ or 827 (HHDR) [MR]

Second Buddha. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]

Second Buddha; alias Padmasambhava; synonym for Padmasambhava; [LWx] [RY]

Second Council - Council of 700 Arhats convened at Vaishali one hundred years after the Parinirvana to resolve questions on Vinaya practice [RY]

Second Council at Vaisali: 383 BC [MR]

Second Dharma Wheel; see 'Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma' [LWx] [RY]

Second Dhyana Realm [LWx] [RY]

Second Dhyana Realm. See Dhyana Realms [LW1] [RY]

second prince. See Murub Tseypo [LW1] [RY]

second prince; alias Prince Rölpa Tsal; [LWx] [RY]

Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gnyis pa). The teachings emphasizing bodhichitta and 'emptiness,' that all phenomena are devoid of a self-entity and true existence.[Primer] [RY]

Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma (chos 'khor gnyis pa). The teachings emphasizing 'emptiness,' that all phenomena are devoid of a self-entity and true existence. [RY]

Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]

Second Turning of the Wheel of Dharma; expl.; see 'Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma' [LWx] [RY]

Secret Black Moon (zla gsang nag po). The tantra of Manjushri Body. One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Secret Cave at Chimey Taktsang [LW1] [RY]

Secret Cave at Karmo Taktsang [LW1] [RY]

Secret conduct (gsang ba'i spyod pa). One of the different types of conduct used as an enhancement practice. [RY]

Secret Confession of the Four Classes of Dakinis (mkha' 'gro ma rnam bzhi gsang ba'i bshags pa). [ZL] [RY]

Secret Cycle of Luminosity ('od gsal gsang skor). An aspect of the Instruction Section of Dzogchen. [RY]

Secret Dakini Path. [RY]

Secret Document. (gsang thems). "Secret Document" See note 13: [Peter Roberts]

Secret empowerment (gsang ba'i dbang). The second of the four empowerments. [RY]

secret empowerment (gsang dbang) [LW1] [RY]

secret empowerment [LWx] [RY]

Secret General Tantra. (gsang ba spyi rgyud). In Derge Kangyur it is text 806 in volume Wa. pages 141-168. dkyil 'khor thams cad kyi spyi'i cho ga gsang ba'i rgyud. In Sanskrit: Sarvamandala Samanyavidhinam Guhya Tantra. It also exists in Chinese and Japanese translation. No known Sanskrit original survives. [Peter Roberts]

secret lower gate [LW1] [RY]

secret lower gate; [LWx] [RY]

Secret Mantra (gsang sngags), Skt. guhyamantra. Synonymous with Vajrayana or tantric teachings. 'Guhya' means secret, both concealed and self-secret. 'Mantra' in this context means eminent, excellent, or praiseworthy. [ZL] [RY]

Secret Mantra (gsang sngags). See also Mantrayana, Vajrayana; master; New Schools; outer and inner sections; path of blessing; Pitaka; Three Outer Tantras [LW1] [RY]

SECRET MANTRA (gsang sngags, Skt. guhyamantra). Synonymous with Vajrayana or tantric teachings. 'Guhya' means secret, both concealed and self-secret. 'Mantra' in this context means eminent, excellent, or praiseworthy. [AL] [RY]

Secret Mantra of the Early Translations (gsang sngags snga 'gyur). The Vajrayana system of the Nyingma School the emphasis of which is on the Three Inner Tantras: Mahayoga, Anu Yoga and Ati Yoga. According to Jamgön Kongtrül, the chief scriptures are the Magical Net of Mahayoga, the Embodiment of Realization of Anu Yoga, and the Dzogchen tantras of the Mind Section and Space Section. These are adorned with the Eight Sadhana Teachings while the vital life force is the Instruction Section of Dzogchen, the extract of the realization of Padmasambhava and Vimalamitra which is contained in the collection renowned as Nyingtig Yabshi. See also Three Inner Tantras and Nyingma School. [ZL] [RY]

Secret Mantra of the greater vehicle (theg pa chen po'i gsang sngags). Vajrayana when regarded as a part of Mahayana. [RY]

Secret Mantra Palace. [RY]

Secret Mantra Vajrayana {gsang sngags rdo rje theg pa}. The Secret Mantra Vajrayana is able to make use of relative truth as a path by seeing phenomena as the unlimited display of primordial purity. The six classes of Vajrayana tantras teach this in an increasingly direct and profound way. The gateway to the Vajrayana is the empowerment, which is given by the spiritual master. [RY]

secret mantras. See mantras [LW1] [RY]

secret mantras; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Secret Mantrayana (gsang sngags rdo rje theg pa), a synonym for Vajrayana. See Appendix 1. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Secret Moon Essence (zla gsang thig le). A Mahayoga scripture. Vol. MA of the Nyingma Gyübum. Sometimes counted among the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras as the tantra of enlightened speech. [ZL] [RY]

Secret Ocean Tantra (gsang ba rgya mtsho'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Secret or innermost obstacles (gsang ba'i bar chad). The habitual tendency for grasping and fixation. [RY]

secret questions, which are asked of the candidates before they receive full monastic ordination, concern conceivable obstacles to the keeping of the vows, such as not having permission from one's parents, and so forth. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Secret Tantra of the Blazing Sun Expanse of Luminosity (klong gsal 'bar ba nyi ma'i gsang rgyud). [EMP] [RY]

Secret Treasury of the Dakinis (mkha' 'gro gsang mdzod). [EMP] [RY]

Secret Wisdom (gsang ba ye shes) cycle is possibly the cycle of termas rediscovered by Kunzang Dechen Gyalpo (see Appendix 4), since, according to GC (vol. 3 226) a former Lhagyari king was a chief disciple and patron of Dechen Gyalpo (see Appendix 4). This could also refers to the cycles of the same name revealed by Minling Terdak Lingpa (1646-1714; see chap.1, note 38) and elaborated by Lelung Shepai Dorje (sle lung bzhad pa'i rdo rje, b. 1697; see chap.14, note 51). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Secret Wrathful Manjushri Tantra ('jam dpal khros pa gsang rgyud). Mahayoga Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section which was received by Manjushrimitra. [ZL] [RY]

Seed samadhi (rgyu'i ting nge 'dzin). The third of the three samadhis. [RY]

Seed syllable (yig 'bru). The syllable from which the deity is manifested during the development stage. [RY]

Seeing the mind essence (sems ngo mthong ba). [RY]

Self Liberation of the Six Senses (tshogs drug rang grol). Shabkar's name. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Self of phenomena (chos kyi bdag). An independent entity or inherently existent identity in phenomena. [RY]

Self of phenomena. [RY]

Self of the individual (gang zag gi bdag). See 'individual self.' [RY]

Self-aware self-cognizance (rang rig rang gsal). [RY]

Self-Born Padma, expl. of name of Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]

Self-born Padma; expl. of name of Padmasambhava [LWx] [RY]

Self-cognizance (rang rig). [RY]

Self-cognizant mindfulness (rang gsal gyi dran pa). [RY]

self-consecration [LWx] [RY]

self-consecration; relative [LW1] [RY]

self-empowerments. (bdag 'jug) Literally "Self-Entry". This is an use of the liturgy of the empowerment of a particular deity as a practice. Without the presence of an external lama, one uses all the ritual objects etc., oneself, while internally doing all the visualisations and meditation necessary for receiving the empowerment. In this way, one "enters" into the mandala of that deity. [Peter Roberts]

self-entity (bdag); expl. of two kinds [LW1] [RY]

Self-entity (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent entity of the individual self or of phenomena. [RY]

SELF-ENTITY (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent entity of the individual self or of phenomena.[AL] [RY]

self-entity; expl. of two kinds [LWx] [RY]

self-entry. The self-entry, means entering the mandala of liberation of the deity you have been practicing. This is done by using the empowerment text, and receiving the empowerments though one's own practice and visualisation, without an external teacher giving the empowerment. [Peter Roberts]

Self-existing natural flow (rang byung rang babs). [RY]

Self-existing self-cognizance (rang byung rang gsal). [RY]

Self-existing wakefulness (rang byung ye shes). [RY]

self-existing wakefulness (rang byung ye shes); as emanation basis for all syllables, as synonym for sugata essence [LW1] [RY]

self-existing wakefulness; as emanation basis for all syllables; as synonym for sugata essence; [LWx] [RY]

Self-existing wisdom (rang byung ye shes). Basic wakefulness that is independent of intellectual constructs. [ZL] [RY]

Self-grasping (atma graha, bdag 'dzin). A mind apprehending an independently existent self-nature of a person or of dharmas; the misconception of a truly existing self. [RY]

Selflessness (bdag med). The innate absence of a self-entity in both the individual person as well as in matter and mind. [RY]

Selflessness. = Non-self. [RY]

Self-liberated (rang grol). [RY]

Self-liberated Direct Seeing that Points Out the Awareness (rig pa ngo sprod cer mthong rang grol). [EMP] [RY]

self-nature (rang bzhin) [LWx] [RY]

Self-nature (rang bzhin). An inherently existent and independent substance of the individual self or of phenomena. Something that can serve as a valid basis for individual attributes. [RY]

self-nature (rang bzhin). See also emptiness [LW1] [RY]

SELF-NATURE (rang bzhin). See 'Self-entity.'[AL] [RY]

self-nature [LWx] [RY]

Self-occurring (rang shar). [RY]

Seltong (gsal stong). Luminosity inseparable from emptiness. [RY]

Sem (sems). When opposed to 'rigpa,' it means the ordinary state of dualistic mind which is ignorant of its own nature and produces karma for further samsaric rebirth. [RY]

semi-apparent natural nirmanakaya realm; [LWx] [RY]

semi-apparent nirmanakaya; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Semi-manifest natural nirmanakaya realms of Mahabrahma. [Daki] [RY]

Semnyi Ngalso. [RY]

Semo (bse mo). [ZL] [RY]

Sending and taking (gtong len). See 'giving and taking.' [RY]

sending and taking. The practice of sending and taking, is the practice of giving away all happiness and good karma to all beings, while taking all their suffering and bad karma into oneself. It is a practice which is done combined with visualisation and one's breathing. [Peter Roberts]

SENGCHEN NAMTRAK (seng chen nams brag). One of the 25 sacred places of Kham opened by Chokgyur Lingpa. Sengchen Namtrak means 'Great Lion Sky Cliff.'[AL] [RY]

Sengchen Namtrak. [RY]

Senge Dongma. [RY]

Senge Dradrok; one of the eight manifestations [LW1] [RY]

Senge Dzongphuk (seng ge rdzong phug) [LW1] [RY]

Senge Wangchuk (lce btsun seng ge dbang phyug)11th-12th century. Chetsün Senge Wangchuk is counted among the lineage gurus in the transmission of Nyingthig which he received from his root guru Dangma Lhungyal as well as from Vimalamitra directly. As a result of his high level of realization, his physical body disappeared in rainbow light at the time of death. Before passing away, he uttered this last song. His later reincarnation as Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo remembered the Dzogchen teachings which Senge Wangchuk had transmitted to the dakini Palgyi Lodrö and wrote them down as the terma Chetsün Nyingthig, one of the most important Dzogchen instructions based on the transmission from Vimalamitra. [RY]

Senge Yutso. [RY]

Senmo (bsen mo). [ZL] [RY]

Senmo (bsen mo). A type of evil spirit often found in company with the gyalpo class and thus are the male and female spirits symbolizing desire and anger. [ZL] [RY]

Sense bases (skye mched), ayatana. The five senses and their five objects as well as the mental faculty and mental objects. [RY]

sense bases (skye mched). See aggregates, elements, and sense bases; six sense bases; twelve sense bases [LW1] [RY]

SENSE BASES (skye mched). The twelve sense factors are the organs of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind consciousness as well as their corresponding objects which are visual form, sound, smell, taste, texture, and mental object.[AL] [RY]

Sense factors (skye mched). The twelve sense factors are the organs of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind consciousness as well as their corresponding objects which are visual form, sound, smell, taste, texture, and mental object. [RY]

sense faculties, five (dbang po lnga) [LW1] [RY]

sense objects (yul); five; six [LW1] [RY]

sense powers. See sense faculties [LW1] [RY]

sense-bases; see 'aggregates, elements, and sense-bases'; six; twelve [LWx] [RY] Sentient being (sems can). Any living being in one of the six realms who has not attained liberation. [ZL] [RY]

Sentient beings (sattva, sems can; also jagat, 'gro (ba)). Any beings who have not yet attained Buddhahood. [RY]

sentient beings (sems can); definition according to Dzogchen [LW1] [RY]

Separation or preference (dbye bsri) is synonymous with distant or close (nye ring). [RY]

Sera monastery. [RY]

Serak (bse rag). A type of mischievous spirit who consumes the potent essences of food and wealth. He personifies ultimate envy and miserliness and is usually exorcized during rituals to promote wealth and prosperity. [ZL] [RY]

Seralung used to house up to one hundred monks, tradionally a monastery of the Drigung Kagyu order it was totally destroyed by the Chinese and the small newly built temple is now run by Gelukpa monks. Nearby on the shore of the lake on finds the five-colored sands. Trugo Monastery and Yer-ngo Monastery (in ruins) are places where Atisha spent some time in meditation. Trugo is also a market place to which many nomads converge. Chiu Monastery, on a hill where Guru Rinpoche spent his last seven days in Tibet (?) [MR]

serenity (snyoms 'jug) conceptionless serenity [LW1] [RY]

SERENITY OF CESSATION ('gog pa'i snyoms 'jug). The meditative state entered by an arhant after all disturbing emotions, sensations and thinking have ceased. It is not considered the ultimate goal by the Mahayana schools.[AL] [RY]

serenity of cessation [LWx] [RY]

serenity of the sphere of infinite consciousness; expl. [LW1] [RY]

serenity of the sphere of infinite space; expl. [LWx] [RY]

serenity of the sphere of neither absence of conception nor presence of conception; expl. [LW1] [RY]

serenity of the sphere of nothing whatsoever; expl. [LW1] [RY]

serenity of the sphere of nothing whatsoever; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Serkyem (gser skyems). Oblation, libation, drink, offering; sacrificial pouring of a liquid or the liquid thus poured; [RY]

Serling (gser gling). [ZL] [RY]

Session {thun}. A fixed period of meditation practice. [RY]

sevasadhana. Sevasadhana.: Tibetan: bsnyen sgrub. While the Sanskrit word sadhana can have as many as thirty-four different meanings, the meaning here of course is the practice of a Tantric deity as "a means of accomplishment". The word "Seva" also has a range of meanings, its root being to serve and attend, but also meaning to honour and worship, to be devoted or even addicted to, to practice and employ, to follow, to cultivate, practice, to frequent and inhabit. The Tibetan part of this word: bsnyen, can mean both to honour or worship, and to approach or be near to, and is usually transalted as "approach". However, the basic meaning of this whole word, is to practice something assiduously and intensively, or to do something repeatedly. A Tibetan definition, is "to be closely associated with a deity". Thrangu Rinpoche says that sevasadhana means an intensive practice of a deity, but not necessarily within a retreat context, although it is a retreat form of practice that will be described in this text. He also states that it does not specifically mean the repeated accumulation of specific numbers of mantras, another principal characteristic of the practice. [Peter Roberts]

sevasadhana. Sevasadhana.: Tibetan: bsnyen sgrub. While the Sanskrit word sadhana can have as many as thirty-four different meanings, the meaning here of course is the practice of a Tantric deity as "a means of accomplishment". The word "Seva" also has a range of meanings, its root being to serve and attend, but also meaning to honour and worship, to be devoted or even addicted to, to practice and employ, to follow, to cultivate, practice, to frequent and inhabit. The Tibetan part of this word: bsnyen, can mean both to honour or worship, and to approach or be near to. However, the basic meaning of this whole word, is to practice something assiduously and intensively, or to do something repeatedly. A Tibetan definition, is "to be closely associated with a deity". Thrangu Rinpoche says that sevasadhana means an intensive practice of a deity, but not necessarily within a retreat context, although it is a retreat form of practice that will be described in this text. He also states that it does not specifically mean the repeated accumulation of specific numbers of mantras, another principal characteristic of the practice. Although Rinpoche said that "intensive-practice" would be a suitable translation, it proved rather awkward, due to its repeated use in the text. As sadhana is already a familiar term, I have used the Sanskrit for this important word throughout the text. [Peter Roberts]

Seven aspects of union (kha sbyor yan lag bdun). The seven qualities of a sambhogakaya buddha: complete enjoyment, union, great bliss, absence of a self-nature, presence of compassion, being uninterrupted, and being unceasing. [ZL] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun) [LWx] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub kyi yan lag bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun). Samadhi, full discernment of phenomena, mindfulness, diligence, rejoicing/joy, pliancy, and impartiality. [E] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors (byang chub yan lag bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven bodhi-factors; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven branch prayer a number of times. The seven branch prayer, is a prayer of homage, offering, confession, rejoicing in the good actions of others, requesting the Dharma-wheel to be turned, a supplication to not pass away into the parinirvana, and a dedication of one's good karma. [Peter Roberts]

seven branch prayer. The original terma text: Rigdzin Jatson Nyingpo's terma are in six volumes, the Köncho Chidu, or Ratnasamanyasamgha texts form the first volume. The various practices are in the form of short texts, that have to be combined in one's practice. Jamgön Kongtrül is here describing a practice being done in relation to these texts. Later, he compiled a sadhana and a preliminary text from this, which is what is now generally used. In his version of the sadhana, the seven-line prayer does not, as in the original text, follow the refuge and bodhicitta verse, instead Vajrasattva does. and the seven-line prayer is inserted into the mandala-offering section. In the detailed preliminary text, the line of refuge is contained within a specially written section, as are the three lines of the bodhicitta. A Vajrasattva practice then follows, and this seven-branch prayer opens the mandala-section. [Peter Roberts]

seven branches (yan lag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]

Seven branches (yan lag bdun pa). The seven branch practice of prostrating to the Three Jewels, confessing negative actions, making offering, rejoicing in the virtue of others, requesting to turn the wheel of Dharma, beseeching to not pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit to the enlightenment of all sentient beings. [RY]

seven branches (yan lag bdun pa); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Seven Chapters {le'u bdun ma}. A famous supplication to Padmasambhava in seven songs revealed by terton Zangpo Tragpa, 14th century. [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun) [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven Chosen Ones (sad mi bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven collections [LWx] [RY]

seven collections of consciousness (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [RY]

seven collections of consciousnesses (rnam shes tshogs bdun) [LWx] [RY]

Seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [RY]

seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]

seven cycles of the ultimate (don dam skor bdun) [LWx] [RY]

Seven golden mountains (gser ri bdun). According to the cosmology of the Abhidharma, seven circles of mountains surrounding Mount Sumeru in the center of our universe. [ZL] [RY]

Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Hundred Thousand ('bum phrag bdun pa) [LWx] [RY]

Seven kinds of vows of the pratimoksha (so so thar pa'i ris bdun). Seven sets of vows for ordained monks and nuns, novices and lay people. See 'Individual Liberation.' [RY]

Seven Line Prayer. [RY]

Seven Line Supplication (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). [ZL] [RY]

SEVEN LINE SUPPLICATION (tshig bdun gsol 'debs). The famous supplication to Padmasambhava beginning with "On the northwest border of the country of Uddiyana, …"[AL] [RY]

Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Namla Tri (gnam la khri bdun), [RY]

Seven noble riches ('phags pa'i nor bdun) The richness of faith, discipline, diligence, modesty, learning, generosity and intelligence. [RY]

seven noble riches or qualities ('phags pa'i nor bdun). Faith, discipline, generosity, learning, a sense of moral shame in front of others, a sense of ethical conscience in regard to oneself, and intelligence. One also speaks of faith, which is like a river; discipline, which is like a flower; generosity, which is like a jewel; learning, which is like an ocean; samaya, which is like a crystal; a sense of moral shame, which is undeceiving like one's own parents; and wisdom, which is like the sun. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Patriarchs - Early leader of the Sangha in the time after the Buddha. Some traditions recognize eight or more patriarchs. [RY]

Seven points of meditation posture (rnam snang chos bdun). The legs in crosslegged position, the spine straight, the shoulders extended, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose. [RY]

Seven points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma) written by Geshe Chen-ngawa (spyan snga ba, also known as tshul khrims 'bar, 1038-1103) according to the oral instructions on loving-kindness, compassion, and Bodhicitta that he had received from Drom Tönpa ('brom ston pa, 1005-64), the chief disciple of Atisha (982-1054). The latter had received these instructions from the great Bodhicitta master Serlingpa. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Points of Mind Training (blo sbyong don bdun ma); listing of; quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Seven postures of Vairochana {snam snang chos bdun}. Seven postures adopted during meditation. [RY]

Seven precious substances (rin chen bdun). Ruby, sapphire, lapis, emerald, diamond, pearl and coral. Sometimes the list includes gold, silver, and crystal. [ZL] [RY]

Seven Profound Cycles (zab pa skor bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seven Profound Cycles; [LWx] [RY]

Seven pure aspects (bdun rnam dag). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]

Seven purities (dag pa bdun). Same as the 'seven branches.' [RY]

Seven qualities of a high rebirth (mtho ris yon tan bdun): noble family, beautiful bodily form, long life-span, no illness, good fortune, abundant wealth, and great intelligence. [RY]

seven royal emblems are the precious wheel, the precious jewel, the precious queen, the precious elephant, the precious minister, the precious horse, and the precious general. Here, Tashi Dedenpa is endowed with the seven noble riches (see chap.5, note 13). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven royal possessions (rgyal srid sna bdun). The precious wheel, jewel, minister, horse, elephant, queen, and general. [RY]

Seven Sections of Abhidharma (mngon pa sde bdun); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Seven Sections of Accomplishment (grub pa sde bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

seven special qualities of Mantrayana; listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven thought states resulting from delusion (gti mug las byung ba'i rtog pa bdun). See list under 'eighty inherent thought states' (rang bzhin brgyad cu'i rtog pa) [RY]

Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun) are: 1) Oral tradition (bka' ma) the early translated tripitaka and tantras passed on unbrokenly from master to disciple; 2) Earth Treasure (sa gter), revealed by the tertön; 3) Rediscovered Treasure (yang gter), revealed for the second time from an past treasure; 4) Mind Treasure (dgongs gter), revealed from the mind of the guru; 5) Hearing Lineage (snyan brgyud), received directly from an enlightened being; 6) Pure Vision (dag snang), received in a pure experience; and 7) Recollection (rjes dran), remembrance from a former life. [RY]

Seven transmissions (bka' babs bdun): canonical lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage. [RY]

Seven Transmissions (bka' babs bdun); listing of [LWx] [RY]

Seven Treasures {mdzod bdun}. A writing in seven volumes by Longchen Rabjam. It covers all aspects of the Buddhist teachings and in particular all the subtleties of the Great Perfection. [RY]

Seven Treasuries (mdzod bdun), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Treasuries, (mdzod bdun) and the Three Great Chariots (ngal so skor gsum), see Translator's Introduction, note 15. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven Treatises on Logic; [Pramanavarttika-karika and six other important texts]; (tshad ma sde bdun); Dharmakirti, 7th century. [PK] [RY]

seven types of attention (yid byed bdun); detailed expl.; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven types of Individual Liberation (so thar ris bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun) are: 1) In the context of the ground, emptiness is uncuttable by the klesha obscuration and 2) indestructible by the conceptual obscuration. 3) In the context of the path, its essence is true, 4) its nature is solid and 5) its function is stable. 6) In the context of the fruition, it is unattached to the klesha obscuration and 7) undefeatable or unobstructed by the conceptual obscuration. [RY]

Seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Emptiness externally is 1) solid, firm, and unbreakable, internally 2) the core and 3) without hollowness, 4) not cutable into pieces, 5) not possibly split asunder or destroyed, 6) impossible to burn and 7) finally imperishable, it is therefore described as the vajra of emptiness. These seven vajra qualities, such as being uncuttable and indestructible, etc. are according to Jamdrak. [RY]

Seven Vajra Qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun). Incorruptibility [sra ba] is one of seven so-called vajra attributes [rdo rje'i chos bdun] of the abiding nature of reality. The other attributes are invulnerability [mi chod pa], indestructibility [mi shigs pa], authenticity [bden pa], stability [brtan pa], unobstructibility [thogs pa med pa], and invincibility [ma pham pa]. See Buddhahood Without Meditation, Richard Barron, trans. [Padma Publishing, 1994], pp. 33-34. [RY]

seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); another listing of; listing of [LWx] [RY]

seven vajra qualities (rdo rje'i chos bdun); listing of [LW1] [RY]

SEVEN WAYS OF TRANSMISSION (bka' babs bdun). Canonical or oral lineage, revealed treasure, rediscovered treasure, mind treasure, recollection, pure vision and hearing lineage.[AL] [RY]

Seven Wheels of Kshitigarbha Sutra (sa snying 'khor lo bdun gyi mdo). [RY]

seven-branch prayer (yan lag bdun pa). 1) Prostration as an antidote to pride, 2) offering as an antidote to miserliness, 3) confession and repentance as an antidote to the three poisons, 4) joy at others' happiness and virtues as an antidote to jealousy, 5) the request that the Wheel of Dharma be turned as a purification for having abandoned the Dharma in the past, 6) the prayer that the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and spiritual masters remain in this world as a purification for having upset one's teacher, and 7) dedication of merit as an antidote to wrong views. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

sevenfold greatness (chen po bdun); of Mahayana, listing of [LW1] [RY]

Sevenfold Pointing-out Instruction (ngo sprod bdun pa). [EMP] [RY]

Sevenfold posture of Vairochana (rnam snang chos bdun). See (‘seven-point posture…’) - This positon is described as the legs in full lotus, the spine straight, the shoulders broadened, the neck slightly bent, the hands in the gesture of equanimity, the tip of tongue touching the palate, and the gaze placed in the direction of the nose.[EMP] [RY]

SEVENFOLD PURITY (dag pa bdun). Same as the seven branches: Prostrating, making offerings, confessing, rejoicing, requesting to turn the Wheel of the Dharma, beseeching not to pass into nirvana, and dedicating the merit for the welfare of all beings.[AL] [RY]

seven-point posture of vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana, the so-called "lotus posture," the right foot over the left thigh. 2) The hands closed into fists, and with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows are then locked straight. (One variation of this is to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides; another is to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight and erect, "like a pile of golden coins." 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking and unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p. 41. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven-point Posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun). A certain meditation posture to be learned through oral instructions. [RY]

seven-point posture of Vairocana (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left. 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees). 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward. 4) The abdomen should be pushed forward. 5) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins. 6) The chin should be tucked in slightly. 7) The eyes should be kept without blinking, unwaveringly focused at a distance of twelve fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose. See Shechen Gyaltsap's kun mkhyen zhal lung, p.41-2. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seven-point posture of Vairocana; (rnam snang chos bdun): 1) The legs should be crossed in the Vajrasana posture, the right one over the left., 2) The hands closed into fists, with the thumb pressing the base of the fourth finger, are placed on the thighs at the juncture with the pelvis, and the elbows then locked straight. (Two variations of this are to place the hands palms up, right over left, on the lap, with elbows bent out to the sides, or to place both hands palms down, relaxed, on the knees.), 3) The shoulders should be raised and rolled slightly forward., 4) The spine should be kept straight, "like a pile of golden coins.", 5) The chin should be tucked in slightly towards the throat., 6) The tip of the tongue should be curled up to touch the palate., 7) The eyes should be kept unwaveringly focused at a distance of l2 fingers' breadth ahead of the tip of the nose, without blinking. [MR]

Seven-rebirth pills (skye bdun ril bu) are prepared from sacred substances including originally, it is said, the flesh of a person reborn seven successive lifetimes as a brahmin. The mere taste of these is said to shut the doors of rebirth in the lower realms of samsara. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

seventeen abodes of the Realm of Form (gzugs khams gnas ris bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seventeen abodes of the Realms of Form (gzugs khams kyi gnas ris bcu bdun). The four Dhyana Realms of three each plus the five Pure Abodes. For details, see Mipham Rinpoche's Gateway to Knowledge. [RY]

Seventeen Dzogchen Tantras (rdzogs chen gyi rgyud bcu bdun) [LW1] [RY]

Seventeen tantras {rgyud bcu bdun}. The tantras of the extremely profound innermost unsurpassed cycle of pith instructions of Atiyoga. [RY]

Seventy Admonitions, lit. the Seventy Verses ending with "Ang" (ang yig bdun bcu pa), is spiritual advice by Karak Gomchung that condenses the essence of the Kadampa teachings. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Seventy Verses on Emptiness; Shunyatasaptati-karika; (stong nyid bdun cu pa); Nagarjuna, 1st-2nd century. [PK] [RY]

seventy-two Palgöns [LW1] [RY]

Sey, Chak and Dung (bse lcags dung). [ZL] [RY]

Seyna-lek Jing-yön (sad na legs 'jing yon). [ZL] [RY]

sgeg pa rdo rje - wo1 253 life story [RY]

sgrub sde - Mahayoga wo1 258- [RY]

sgyud sde - Mahayoga wo1 -258 [RY]

sha gzan, a fully grown sheep (i.e., at least three years old). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal : 1594-1651 [MR]

Shabdrung Rinpoche. See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]

Shabdrung Rinpoche; another name of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; [LWx] [RY]

Shabkar - In his History of the Great Monastery of Rongpo (RO, p.646), Jigme Thekcho speaks of twenty-two major works of Shabkar: nine "Emanated Scriptures" (sprul pa'i glegs bam), three "Excellent Discourses" (legs bshad), three "Dharma Discourses" (chos bshad), three "Songs on the View" (lta mgur), and four "Autobiographical Songs" (rnam mgur). However, he does not identify them individually. The nine "Emanated Scriptures" have been reviewed above. The three "Excellent Discourses" are The Self-arising Sun (legs bshad nyi ma rang shar), The Golden Scalpel (legs bshad gser gyi thur ma), and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (legs bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). In his autobiography, Shabkar mentions four, not three, "Dharma Discourses": The Beneficial Sun (chos bshad gzhan phan nyi ma), The Beneficial Moon (chos bshad gzhan phan zla ba), The Beneficial Jewel (chos bshad gzhan phan nor bu) and The Offering-Cloud of Samantabhadra (chos bshad kun bzang mchod sprin). The three "Songs on the View" may correspond to the trilogy of The Flight of the Garuda. The identification of the four "Autobiographical Songs" is also unclear, although here and there in the autobiography Shabkar offers summaries of his life (for example, in chapters 11 and 15). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shabkar (zhabs dkar). Literally, 'White Feet.' The name of Tsogdruk Rangdrol given to him because wherever he placed his feet the area became 'white' or virtuous. [RY]

Shabkar Tsogdruk Rangdrol (zhabs dkar tshogs drug rang grol): 1781-1851 [MR]

Shaci (legs brjod ma). (bde sogs), 'Divine Power', wife of shakra or Indra. [RY]

Shailendra - Dynasty of Buddhist kings, originally from Java, who took control of Shrivijaya [RY]

Shaking Samsara From Its Depths ('khor ba sdong sprugs). [ZL] [RY]

Shakputri (shak pu tri). The son of King Jah and lineage holder of both Mahayoga and Anu Yoga. He is also known as Indrabhuti the Younger and Master Lawapa. [ZL] [RY]

Shakra (brgya byin). Ruler of the gods of the lower heavens of the Desire Realm, who dwells in the immense Vaijayanta palace on the summit of Mount Meru. Sometimes referred to as Indra. [RY]

Shakti. Divine energy or power, personified as female in Hindu Tantra. The term is never used for female deities in Buddhist Tantra, and would for most of them be inappropriate, though Tara might be a exception. [RY]

Shakya - the clan into which the Buddha was born; their lands in northern India bordered on Nepal. The Shakyas were destroyed by neighboring peoples during the Buddha's lifetime. [RY]

Shakya (sha kya). The name of the family clan into which Buddha Shakyamuni was born. practitioners are often given Shakya as a part of their Buddhist name. [ZL] [RY]

Shakya Devi, the daughter of a Nepalese King. [Daki] [RY]

Shakya Prava [LW1] [RY]

Shakya Senge (sha kya seng ge). One of the eight manifestations of Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]

Shakya Senge; [LWx] [RY]

Shakya Senge; one of the eight manifestations [LW1] [RY]

Shakya Shri (sha kya shr'i.). A Tibetan mahasiddha of the 19th century belong chiefly to the Drukpa Kagyu lineage. [RY]

Shakya Shri: 1127 or 45-1225 [MR]

Shakya Shri: 1127-1225. A great pandita. [RY]

Shakyabodhi (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

Shakyadevi (sha kya de wi). The daughter of the Nepalese king Punyedhara. She is one of the five chief female disciples of Padmasambhava. Since her mother died during her birth, she was abandoned in a charnel ground and brought up by monkeys. Having been accepted as Padmasambhava's worthy companion, she was his consort for the practice of the nine divinities of Vishuddha in the Cave of Yanglesh" where they displayed the manner of achieving the vidyadhara level of mahamudra. Shakyadevi attained the accomplishment of the female buddha Mamaki and finally achieved the indestructible rainbow body. [ZL] [RY]

Shakyamuni (sha kya thub pa). 'The Sage of the Shakyas,' Buddha Shakyamuni, our historical buddha. [ZL] [RY]

Shakyamuni Buddha - () The sage of the Shakyas; the historical Buddha, born in Kapilvastu; the fourth Buddha of the Bhadrakalpa and seventh Buddha of the present era [RY]

Shakyaprabha; (sha kya 'od) Born in Kashmir, he was a disciple of Punyakirti and Shatiprabha. He wrote several treatises on Vinaya. [MR]

Shakyas - The people of the small republican kingdom north of Magadha where the Buddha was born [RY]

Shalmali of Iron (lcags kyi shal ma li). [ZL] [RY]

Shalu Ridugpa Losel Tenkyong: 1804 [MR]

Shamanism (bon 'gyer). In this book the term has the negative connotation of rituals performed for selfish or superficial mundane aims. [ZL] [RY]

Shamar Chen-ngawa Chökyi Trakpa (zhwa dmar spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa, 1453-1524), the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa. Born in Kangmar in Domey, he became a disciple of the seventh Karmapa Chötrak Gyatso (karma pa chos grags rgya mtsho, 1450-1506). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shamar Konchok Yanlag (1525-1583) was the fifth bearer of the Shamar crown and the disciple and lineage holder of the eighth Karmapa, Mikyo Dorje. [RY]

Shamar Trisur Garwang Gyatso (zhwa dmar khri zur gar dbang rgya mtsho). See GC, vol. 4, pp. 133-7. Wondrous signs indicated that he was the reincarnation of the eighth Shamar, Palchen Chökyi Dondrup (1695-1732), and he was enthroned at Yangpachen. However, when another reincarnation was recognized, he left the throne and remained at Namseling (rnam sras gling); hence his title of "retired" Shamar (zur pa). His main teacher was Gampo Kunzang Ngedön Wangpo (sgam po kun bzang nges don dbang po). He displayed a vast activity for the benefit of the Dharma and sentient beings, and lived fifty-eight years. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shamar: IV Chökyi Dragpa; 1453-1524, (spyan snga ba chos kyi grags pa);, the fourth Shamarpa, or Red Hat Karmapa, born in Kangmar in Domey. He became disciple of the Seventh Karmapa: VII Chötrag Gyatso; (ka rma pa chos grags rgya mthso;, 1450-1506). [MR]

SHAMATHA (zhi gnas) 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought.[AL] [RY]

Shamatha (zhi gnas). 'Calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided; or, the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

shamatha (zhi gnas). See also nine means of mental stillness; and vipashyana; literal meaning; obstacles for the cultivation of; of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness [LW1] [RY]

Shamatha (zhi gnas). Stillness, literally 'calm abiding' or 'remaining in quiescence' after thought activity has subsided. It can also mean the meditative practice of calming the mind in order to rest free from the disturbance of thought. Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas) is the practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med) is the act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and Dzogchen and should not be mistaken for 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö.[Primer] [RY]

shamatha and vipashyana [LWx] [RY]

Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). [RY]

Shamatha cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Vajrayana practice, this term is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of enlightenment. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]

shamatha of the meditation state; in regards to the nine methods of mental stillness; [LWx] [RY]

Shamatha state of cessation (zhi gnas 'gog pa). In the context of Mahayana or Vajrayana practice, this state is used in a derogatory sense and is renowned as a severe side-track from the path of the enlightenment of the buddhas. The mistake comes from regarding meditation practice as being the act of cultivating and fixating on a state in which sensations and thoughts are absent. [RY]

Shamatha that delights the tathagatas (de bzhin gshegs dgyes/ dge'i zhi gnas). The shamatha state at the first bhumi which is embraced with insight into emptiness. [RY]

Shamatha with attributes (mtshan bcas zhi gnas). [RY]

Shamatha with support (zhi gnas rten bcas). The practice of calming the mind while using an object of concentration, material or mental, or simply the breath. [RY]

Shamatha without attributes (mtshan med zhi gnas). [RY]

Shamatha without support (zhi gnas rten med). The act of calming the mind without any particular object, resting undistractedly. This practice serves as a prelude for Mahamudra and should not be mistaken for being 'ordinary mind' or the view of Trekchö. [RY]

shamatha; obstacles for the cultivation of [LWx] [RY]

Shanavasika - Disciple of Ananda; the third patriarch [RY]

Shang [LW1] [RY]

Shang Rinpoche (shangs): 1353- [MR] 1123-1193? [RY]

Shang Rinpoche, Yudrak Gonpo, see chap.9, note 59. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shang Ton (shangs ston)?: 1309- [MR]

Shangpa / The shangs pa teachings were based on the lineage brought to Tibet by the siddha Khyung po rnal 'byor (11th century?), a great tantric master who has studied with many teachers, including dakinis. Khyung po lived in Shangs in gTsang, central Tibet, where six disciples became his spiritual sons. Thus, this school is sometimes known as the Seven Treasures lineage (the Master and his six sons) or as the Dakini lineage. The teachings of this school, which are powerful and practice-oriented, have been assimilated into the other schools, particularly the bKa' rgyud and dGe lugs schools. [RY]

Shangpa Kagyü [LW1] [RY]

shangshang [LW1] [RY]

Shangshung (zhang zhung). [ZL] [RY]

Shangtong Tashi Dorje (zhong ston bkra shis rdo rje): 1097-1167 [MR]

Shantarakshita - Abbot of Vikramashila who ordained the first Tibetan monks; founder of philosophical school synthesizing Madhyamaka and Yogachara [RY]

Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho) means Peace Sustainer. [RY]

Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho), abbot of Samye [LW1] [RY]

Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho). 'Guardian of Peace.' The Indian pandita and abbot of Vikramashila and of Samye who ordained the first Tibetan monks. He was an incarnation of the bodhisattva Vajrapani and is also known as Khenpo Bodhisattva or Bhikshu Bodhisattva Shantarakshita. He is the founder of philosophical school combining Madhyamaka and Yogachara. This tradition was reestablished and clarified by Mipham Rinpoche in his commentary on the Madhyamaka Lamkara. [ZL] [RY]

Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho). The Indian pandita and abbot of Samye who ordained the first Tibetan monks. [RY]

Shantarakshita (zhi ba 'tsho); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Shantarakshita. He was an incarnation of the bodhisattva Vajrapani who dwells on the bhumis and is known as the Bhikshu Bodhisattva Shantarakshita (dge slong byang chub sems dpa' zhi ba 'tsho). [RY]

Shantarakshita; [LWx] [RY]

Shantideva - Seventh century master at nalanda, one of the 84 Siddhas; author of the Bodhicharyavatara [RY] Shantideva (zhi ba lha). A great learned and realized Indian master. [RY]

Shantideva (zhi ba lha). The great Indian master and scholar; author of the Bodhicharyavatara. [RY]

Shantideva (zhi ba lha); quotation by [LWx] [RY]

Shantideva (zhi ba lha, 685-763) was one of the eighty-four mahasiddhas of India. He composed the famous Bodhicaryavatara (byang chub sems dpa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa, T 3871), Engaging in the Bodhisattva's Activity, from which the verse quoted here is extracted. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shantideva {zhi ba lha}. Indian mahasiddha and scholar at Nalanda university during the first half of the 8th century. He astounded the monks of Nalanda with his famous poem on bodhicitta, the Bodhicaryavatara {byang chub sems pa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa}. He was one of the eightyfour mahasiddhas of India. [RY]

Shantigarbha (zhi ba'i snying po) [LW1] [RY]

Shantigarbha (zhi ba'i snying po); mention of [LWx] [RY]

Shariputra - One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom [RY]

Shariputra (sha ri'i bu). One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in wisdom. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Shariputra [LW1] [RY]

Sharmapa Chökyi Wangchuk (zhva dmar pa chos kyi dbang phyug). 1584-c.1635. The sixth master in the line of Sharmapa incarnations. [RY]

sharp-pointed red torma (dmar gtor rtse rno), [RY]

Shasa Horma (sha za hor ma). According to Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche this is the same as Shasa Khamoche (sha za kha mo che), a wrathful female wisdom protector who was entrusted by Guru Padmasambhava at Samye Chimphu to guard the Nyingma teachings in general and the Lama Gondu (bla ma dgongs 'dus) cycle in particular (a terma rediscovered by Sangye Lingpa, 1340-1396). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shastras {bstan chos}. Commentaries specifically illustrating the meaning of the Buddha's teachings. The three qualifications for composing shastras are perfect realization, a vision of the yidam deity and complete knowledge of the five sciences. [RY]

Shavaripa (sha ba ri pa). A great Indian master and the guru of Saraha. [RY]

Shawopa, or Shawo Gangpa;, (sha bo sgang pa), 1067-1131, a disciple of Langri Tangpa;, (glang ri thang pa) and of the Three Brothers -- Putowa;, (pu to ba), Chengnawa;, (spyan snga ba), and Puchungwa; (phu chung ba)--the three main disciples of Dromtönpa;, ('brom ston pa). [MR]

Shechen Gyaltsap Rinpoche, Gyurme Pema Namgyal, (zhe chen rgyal tshab 'gyur med pad ma rnam rgyal) [MR]

Shechen Kongtrül Pema Drime (zhe chen kong sprul pad ma dri med): 1901-1960 [MR]

Shechen Ongtrul Gyurme Tuthob Namgyal (zhe chen dbon sprul 'gyur med mthu stobs rnam rgyal):1787- [MR]

Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Shechen Rabjam: 1910-195? [MR]

Shechen, Monastery [LW1] [RY]

Sheja Kunkhyab Treasury (shes bya kun khyab mdzod). One of the Five Treasuries of Jamgön Kongtrül containing an encyclopedia of Buddhism and Buddhist culture in three volumes. At present, it is being translated under the guidance of H.E. Kalu Rinpoche. [RY]

Sheldam Nyingjang (zhal gdams snying byang) is the basic root text and the first volume of the Barchey Künsel cycle revealed by Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sheldam Nyingjang (zhal gdams snying byang), root tantra of Barchey Künsel [LW1] [RY]

Sheldam Nyingjang Yishin Norbu (zhal gdams snying byang yid bzhin nor bu). The Wish-fulfilling Jewel Essence Manual of Oral Instruction, the major text among the collection of treasures belonging to Lamey Tukdrub Barchey Künsel. It is the first volume in the New Delhi edition of the New Treasures of Chokgyur Lingpa (mchog gling gter gsar). [RY]

Sheldam Nyingjang; quotation from; root tantra of Barchey Künsel [LWx] [RY]

Sheldrak Phuk (shel brag phug) [LW1] [RY]

Shelkar Chöde; (shel dkar chos sde) A monastery founded by a Sakya Lama, Sindeu Rinchen, who then turned to the Geluk order. [MR]

Shelkar Chödeh (shel dkar chos sde) is located near Shelkar Dzong (shel dkar rdzong), the provincial capital of Tingri, which marks the limit between the provinces of Tsang (gtsang) and Lato (stod). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shelkar Dzong; (shel dkar rdzong) The Whitle Crystal Castle /Fortress, was the provincial capital for the Tingri area. [MR]

Shenpa Pekar (bshan pa pe kar). [ZL] [RY]

Shenpa. [RY]

Shenrab / (gshen rab) - according to the Bon tradition, the founder of the Bon religion. [RY]

Shentong (gzhan stong). An aspect of the Madhyamaka School in Tibet focusing on emptiness indivisible from luminosity, asserting that the kayas and wisdoms of buddhahood are naturally present within the sugata essence. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Shentrul Wangje (gzhan 'phrul dbang byed) One of the abodes of gods in the Realm of Desire. [RY]

Shijey (Pacifying) (zhi byed) [LW1] [RY]

Shijey (zhi byed). Pacifying, one of the Eight Practice Lineages brought to Tibet by Phadampa Sangye. [RY]

Shijey / The Zhi byed teachings were brought to Tibet by Dam pa sang rgyas, a siddha who visited Tibet several times around the 12th century and introduced the gCod teachings. His disciple, sKyo ston bSod nams bla ma, founded the Father lineage of gCod which followed the Sutrayana teachings according to Aryadeva; Ma gcig Slab sgron, a great female siddha, founded the Mother lineage, based on Prajnaparamita. Zhi byed emphasizes teachings suited to the individual's consciousness rather than adhering to specific texts. gCod teachings continue within other schools, especially rNying ma and bKa' rgyud. [RY]

Shijey / Zhi byed - see Tantra [RY]

Shin (gshin). A type of spirit; either the yama type or simply consciousness of a human who has passed away but is still lingering in the bardo state. [ZL] [RY]

Shin Arahan - Young monk from Thaton responsible for converting King Anoratha of Pagan [RY]

Shingon - Japanese school of Tantra, based on Yoga Tantras as taught in the Chinese tradition; emphasizes practice relating to Vairocana Buddha [RY]

Shingsa Pandita Lobzang Dargye (shing bza' pandita blo bzang dar rgyas, 1753-1824). He became the second abbot of Ragya monastery, succeeding its founder, Arik Geshe. He was considered to be the incarnation of, among others, the Kashmir pandita Sakya Sri and Tsongkhapa's mother, Shingsa Achö, (shing bza' a chos). See Jigme Gyaltsen, p. 11, and AC, vol.2, p.139. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shining Jewel Tantra (rin po che 'bar ba'i rgyud). One of The Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Shining Turquoise Temple [LW1] [RY]

Shinje Tsedak. [RY]

Shinran - Disciple of Honen; founder of the Japanese Jodoshinshu Pure Land School [RY]

Shintam Garbha (zhi ba'i snying po). One of the Eight Vidyadharas, receiver of the transmission of Maledictory Fierce Mantra. Born in Uddiyana and reputed to have visited Tibet and participated in the consecration of the Samye Temple. [ZL] [RY]

Shloka (shlo ka). A stanza, esp. One of four eight-syllable padas; as a unit of length of prose, 32 syllables. [RY]

Shomu - Eight century Japanese emperor and patron of the Dharma [RY]

Short History of Dorje Drag; (rdo rje brag) Monastery: bod yul gangs can gyi ljong su snga 'gyur bka' gter gyi chos brgyud 'dzin pa'i gdan sa chen po thub bstan rdo rje brag E wam lcog sgar ba'i chos brgyud dang gdan rabs bcas kyi lo rgyus mdor bsdus) by Taklung Tsetrul Rinpoche [MR] Short Indirect Meditation Tantra (bsam gtan brgyud pa'i mdo rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Short lineage of Terma (nye brgyud gter ma). The Dharma treasures concealed chiefly by Guru Rinpoche to be discovered in the future by a tertön, a treasure revealer. [RY]

Short Notes; (zin bris chung). [PK] [RY]

Short Truth of the Middle Way (dbu ma bden chung); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Shotoku - Sixth century japanese prince and regent who helped establish the Dharma; built important temples and wrote Buddhist commentaries [RY]

SHRAMANA (dge sbyong). A spiritual practitioner. Often has the connotation of an ascetic or mendicant monk.[AL] [RY]

Shramanera, (dge tshul). Novice, a lesser number of vows taken prior to the full ordination of a monk.[Primer] [RY]

Shravaka (Nyan thos) lit. 'Hearer'; one who listens to the teachings of the Buddha, realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering emotionality, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhants. The vehicle of the Shravaka is known as the Shravakayana. [RY]

Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.' [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY] Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths. [RY]

SHRAVAKA (nyan thos). 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.' [AL] [RY]

Shravaka (nyan thos). 'Hearer, Disciple (of a Buddha)'. A Hinayana Arhant who attains Nirvana under the guidance of a teacher; or someone practicing to become such an Arhant, a Hinayanist. [RY]

shravaka (nyan thos); as noble Sangha; compared to pratyekabuddha School; enlightenment; general accomplishments; relation to Mahayana; Three Jewels; Vaibhashika School; vehicle; vehicle (nyan thos kyi theg pa); vehicle as First Dharma Wheel [LW1] [RY]

Shravaka Collection [LWx] [RY]

Shravaka Collections (nyan thos kyi sde snod) [LW1] [RY]

shravaka. 'Hearer' or 'listener.' Hinayana practitioner of the First Turning of the Wheel of the Dharma on the four noble truths who realizes the suffering inherent in samsara, and focuses on understanding that there is no independent self. By conquering disturbing emotions, he liberates himself, attaining first the stage of Stream Enterer at the Path of Seeing, followed by the stage of Once-Returner who will be reborn only one more time, and the stage of Non-returner who will no longer be reborn into samsara. The final goal is to become an Arhant. These four stages are also known as the 'four results of spiritual practice.'[Primer] [RY]

Shravakas {nyan thos}. Lit. listeners. [RY]

Shravaka's samadhi of peace (nyan thos kyi zhi ba'i ting nge 'dzin). [RY]

Shri (dpal ldan). 'Glorious, splendorous.' A title given to many masters, and placed in front of their names. [RY]

Shri (dpal). 'Glorious, holy', a respectful title. [RY]

Shri Dipam (dpal sgron). The daughter of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Shri Guhyagarbha (dpal gsang ba snying po). An important Nyingma tantra. [RY]

SHRI GUHYASAMAJA (dpal gsang ba 'dus pa). Literally, 'Assembly of Secrets.' One of the major tantras and yidams of the New School.[AL] [RY]

Shri Heruka (dpal chen he ru ka). The wrathful form of Buddha Vairocana. [RY]

Shri Ratna of Bal [LW1] [RY]

Shri Singha (shr'i sing ha). The chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied with the masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Shri Singha (Skt). One of the masters in the lineage of mahasandhi or Dzogchen who was a disciple of Manjushrimitra and also the root guru of Padmasambhava. [RY]

SHRI SINGHA (Skt). The chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied with the masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [AL] [RY]

Shri Singha / Shri Singha - Vidyadhara, born in Khotan and active in China; important in the Vajrayana transmission lineage [RY]

Shri Singha [LW1] [RY]

Shri Singha 1. (Skt). Shri Singha was the chief disciple and successor of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the Chinese city of Shokyam in Khotan and studied at first with the Chinese masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. In his Ocean of Wondrous Sayings, Guru Tashi Tobgyal adds that Shri Singha received a prophesy from Avalokiteshvara while traveling to Serling, telling him to go to the Sosaling charnel ground in order to be sure of the ultimate attainment. After many years Shri Singha met Manjushrimitra in the charnel ground of Sosaling, and remained with him for twenty-five years. Having transmitted all the oral instructions, the great master Manjushrimitra dissolved his bodily form into a mass of light. When Shri Singha cried out in despair and uttered songs of deep yearning, Manjushrimitra appeared again and bestowed him a tiny casket of precious substance. The casket contained his master's final words, a vital instruction named Gomnyam Drugpa, the Six Experiences of Meditation. Having received this transmission, Shri Singha reached ultimate confidence. In Bodhgaya he found the manuscripts of the tantras previously hidden by Manjushrimitra which he took to China where he classified the Instruction Section into four parts: the outer, inner, secret, and the innermost unexcelled sections. Among Shri Singha's disciples were four outstanding masters: Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Shri Singha The chief disciple of Manjushrimitra in the lineage of the Dzogchen teachings. He was born in the Chinese city of Shokyam and studied with the Chinese masters Hatibhala and Bhelakirti. Later he met Manjushrimitra in the charnel ground of Sosaling, and remained with him for 25 years. Among his chief disciples were Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. [RY]

Shri Singha, the great vidyadhara who conferred upon Guru Rinpoche the empowerment of the "Manifestation of Awareness" (rig pa'i rtsal dbang). See chap.4, note 16. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Shri Singha; mention of [LWx] [RY]

Shri Vajrasattva (dpal ldan rdo rje sems dpa'). [RY]

Shrine mandala (rten gyi man dal). The mandala plate placed on the shrine during offerings. [RY]

Shrivijaya - Buddhist kingdom founded in Sumatra that spread throughout Indonesia and onto Malay Peninsula [RY]

Shubhakarasimha - Eight century tantric master in China [RY]

Shuddhodhana - King of the Shakyas; father of Shakyamuni Buddha [RY]

Shudra caste (dmangs rigs). The menial classes. [RY]

Shuksep Jetsün Rigdzin Chönyi Sangmo (shug gseb rje btsun cho nyid bzang mo): 1841-1940 [MR]

Shula Dragmo (shul la brag mo). [ZL] [RY]

Shun-tao - Chinese monk who introduced Dharma to Korea in fourth century [RY]

Shun-tao - Chinese monk who introduced Dharma to Korea in fourth century. [Tarthang]

Shunyata mantra (shu nya ta'i sngags). The mantra Om svabhava shuddho sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham. [RY]

SHURMA (shur ma). A Tibetan script, half way between printed and written script.[AL] [RY]

Shurpa vina (dgu po rgyud mang). A kind of vina. [RY]

Shutö Terdrom at Drigung ('bri gung gzhu stod gter sgrom); see NW, fol. 1b and 5b. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sibtsen land of Mön (mon gyi srib btsan lung) [LW1] [RY]


Siddha - one who has accomplished the siddhis. [RY]

Siddha - Tantric master who attains direct realization outside the conventional course of study [RY]

Siddha (grub pa) (grub thob),. Perfected one, realized one, adept who has attained siddhi. [RY]

Siddha (grub thob). 'Accomplished one.' Someone who has attained siddhi; an accomplished master. [ZL] [RY]

Siddhi (bsgrub) lit. 'success, complete attainment'; there are eight 'common' siddhis developed by the practice of yoga. Among these are clairvoyance, clairaudiance, the ability to fly through the air, the ability to read thoughts, and control of the body and external world, enabling one to transform both at will. The supreme siddhis is enlightenment. [RY]

Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' The attainment resulting from Dharma practice usually referring to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment. It can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments such as clairvoyance, clairaudiance, flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation; the ability to control of the body and external world. The most eminent attainments on the path are, however, renunciation, compassion, unshakable faith and realization of the correct view.[Primer] [RY]

Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' The attainment resulting from Dharma practice usually referring to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment. It can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments such as clairvoyance, clairaudiance, flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation; the ability to control of the body and external world. The most eminent attainments on the path are, however, renunciation, compassion, unshakable faith and realization of the correct view. [RY]

Siddhi (dngos grub). 'Accomplishment.' Usually refers to the 'supreme siddhi' of complete enlightenment, but can also mean the 'common siddhis,' eight mundane accomplishments. [RY]

Siddhi (dngos grub). See Accomplishment. [ZL] [RY]

Siddhi (dngos grub). Success, attainment, esp. Magical attainment such as flying in the sky, becoming invisible, everlasting youth, or powers of transmutation. They are divided into supreme s. (mchog gi dngos grub) and ordinary or common s. (mthun mong gi dngos grub), [RY]

Siddhi of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po'i dngos grub). Same as enlightenment. In the context of Mahayoga Tantra, it can also refer to the attainment of the third vidyadhara level in which 'mahamudra' means the sublime body of the yidam deity. [RY]

Siddhi rastu. "May it be accomplished!" [RY]

Siddhis (dngos grub). The supreme and common accomplishments. The supreme siddhi is the accomplishment of complete enlightenment. The common siddhis are usually eight types of miraculous powers. [RY]

siddhis (dngos grub); supreme and common [LW1] [RY]

Side Ornament. See Zurgyen [LW1] [RY]

Side Ornament; [LWx] [RY]

Sign (rtags). See 'symbol, meaning, and sign.' [RY]

Sign language of dakinis (mkha' 'gro'i brda yig). The secret script of the female spiritual beings which can only be decoded by accomplished masters. [ZL] [RY]

Sign Lineage of the Vidyadharas (rig 'dzin brda brgyud). The second of the three lineages. [RY]

Sign luminosity (brda'i 'od gsal). The experiences of manifest luminosity during the bardo of dying. [RY]

sign script (brda yig) [LW1] [RY]

sign script; reason for; [LWx] [RY]

sign-lineage of the Vidyadharas. The sign-lineage of the Vidyadharas is the second or middle phase of the transmission of the higher Nyingma teachings, and precedes the oral lineage of the individuals, described in note 51. In the Mahayoga, this is the transmission of teachings from the Bodhisattva Vajrapani to a group of five beings: a deva, a yaksha, a rakshasa, a naga and a human. They then wrote these teachings out as texts that they hid in space, from which they later fell like rain onto the palace of King Indrabhuti the First. [Peter Roberts]

signs of progress (drod rtags); of a master [LW1] [RY]

signs of progress; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Signs, eighty (anuvyanjana, dpe byad). See Marks and Signs [RY]

Sikkim. [RY]

Sikojhara. [Daki] [RY]

Silden (bsil ldan); Same as Tibet [LW1] [RY]

Silk Route - Trade route between China and the West that passed through the Central Asian oasis states [RY]

Silk Route - Trade route between China and the West that passed through the Central Asian oasis states. [Tarthang]

silver images of the Three Protectors (rigs gsum mgon po) of Korchag ('khor chags) in Purang, representing the Bodhisattvas Manjusri, Avalokitesvara and Vajrapani. For a detailed description of the fascinating story of these three statues, see Ngawang Sonam Gyaltsen (1988). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Simple (nis-prapanca, spros (pa (dang)) bral (ba)). 'Free of elaboration', i.e. devoid of conventional objects, which are mere mental projections. [RY]

Simplicity (spros bral). 1) The absence of creating mental construct or conceptual formulations about the nature of things. 2) The second stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]

Simplicity (spros bral). The second stage in the practice of Mahamudra. [RY]

Sin. see Evil [RY]

SINDHURA (sin dhu ra). Red or deep orange substance often used in tantric rituals.[AL] [RY]

Sindhura (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

sindhura as an ingredient. Sindhura literally means "sediment from the banks of the Indus", a red earth from a place sacred to Vajrayogini, though the word is used for sacred red earth from any place. Lead oxide (red-lead powder) also called minium, is often used as a substitute. [Peter Roberts]

Singala (Skt.). The land where the Anu Yoga teachings appeared. [ZL] [RY]

Singhamukha (seng ge mdong ma). [Peter Roberts]

Singharaja of Ruley (ru le sim ha ra dza). One of the first Tibetans to take ordination who received transmission from Hungkara in India. Also known as Viryaraja of Ru-yong. [ZL] [RY]

single bindu of self-knowing awareness. Bindu of self-knowing awareness: "bindu" literally means a tiny sphere or drop, meaning that the self-knowing awareness contains within itself, all the multiplicity of samsara and nirvana, without any omission whatsoever. [Peter Roberts]

Single Crescent (zla gam gcig pa). [ZL] [RY]

Single Family of the Great Secret (gsang chen rigs gcig). Sadhana text of Mahayoga composed by Padmasambhava. [ZL] [RY]

Single Fire and Sole Skull (me gcig thod gcig). [ZL] [RY]

Single Form (phyag rgya rkyang pa). Sadhana text of Mahayoga composed by Padmasambhava. The title refers to the sadhana practice of a single deity without a retinue. [ZL] [RY]

Single Meditation Tantra (bsam gtan gcig pu'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Single Mind Tantra (nyag gcig dgongs pa'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]

Single Mother and Queen of Siddhas (ma cig grub pa'i rgyal mo). [ZL] [RY]

single mudra (phyag rgya gcig pa) [LW1] [RY]

Single mudra. The elaborate mudra. The collected assembly practice. (phyag rgya gcig spros tshom bu tshogs sgrub). The single mudra is a deity on its own. The elaborate mudra is a more complex visualisation of a single deity. The gathered-assembly mudra is a group of deities. [Peter Roberts]

single nature ignorance (bdag nyid gcig pa'i ma rig pa); as synonym for the all-ground; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

single recollection (dran pa gcig pa) [LW1] [RY]

Single recollection" (dran pa gcig pa) of the Sarma Schools and the "single mudra" (phyag rgya gcig pa) of the Nyingma School are identical. [RY]

Single sphere (thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [ZL] [RY]

Single Sphere (thig le nyag gcig). [ZL] [RY]

Single sphere (thig le nyag gcig). Synonym for dharmakaya. [RY]

Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [RY]

Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). A symbolic description of dharmakaya being like a single sphere because it is devoid of duality and limitation and defies all 'edges' of conceptual constructs that could be formed about it. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Single sphere of dharmakaya (chos sku thig le nyag cig). All buddhas are one in the all-encompassing space of dharmakaya which is 'round' in the sense of being beyond the 'corners' of thought constructs. [RY]

Single sufficient jewel (nor bu gcig chog). The personal teacher regarded as the embodiment of the Three jewels, the Three Roots, and the Three Kayas. [RY]

Single Syllable (yi ge gcig ma). A short Prajnaparamita sutra. Refers to the letter a, the syllable symbolizing the nonarising nature of emptiness. [ZL] [RY]

single traversed path (bgrod gcig lam) [LW1] [RY]

single traversed path (bgrod gcig lam) [LWx] [RY]

single-nature ignorance (bdag nyid gcig pa'i ma rig pa); as synonym for the all-ground [LW1] [RY]

Sitavana (bsil ba tshal) [RY]

Sitavana charnel ground. [Daki] [RY]

Sitavana. See Cool Grove [LW1] [RY]

Situ Chökyi Jungne, Situ VIII: 1700-1774 [MR]

Situ Chökyi Jungney [LW1] [RY]

Situ Gyurmey Tsewang Gyatso [LW1] [RY]

Situ I Chökyi Gyaltsen (chos kyi rgyal mtshan): 1377-1448 [MR]

Situ Padma Nyinche (si tu pad ma nyin byed). [1774-1853] The 9th Situ Rinpoche and one of the root teachers of the 14th Karmapa and Jamgön Kongtrül. He was predicted by Guru Rinpoche as his own mind-emanation. [RY]

Situ Pandita [LW1] [RY]

Situ Pema Nyinche: 1774-1853 [MR]

Situ Tenpai Nyinche: 1774-1853. [RY]

six abodes of Desire gods ('dod lha ris drug) [LW1] [RY]

six abodes of Desire gods [LWx] [RY]

six bardos (bar do). Bardo, "intermediate" or "transition" state, commonly refers to the transitional state between death and the next rebirth. Texts discuss six bardos: the bardos of birth and life (skye gnas rang bzhin gyi bar do); of meditative concentration (bsam gtan gyi bar do); of the dream-state (rmi lam gyi bar do); of the moment of death ('chi kha'i bar do); of the absolute nature (chos nyid bar do); and of taking a new existence (srid pa'i bar do). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six basic miseries in samsara;: (1) Friends and enemies are changeable., (2) We never seem to have enough., (3) We die again and again., (4) We are reborn again and again., (5) We go up and down in samsara again and again., (6) We are essentially alone. [MR]

six branches of practice, according to the Kalachakra (dus 'khor sbyor ba yan lag drug). Composure (sor-sdud), contemplation (bsam gtan), breath-control (srog 'dzin), apprehension of the complete deity (sku ril bur 'dzin pa), subsequent recollection of this (rjes su dran pa), and contemplation (ting nge 'dzin). See NS, vol. 2, p.151, and DZ, vol. 16. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six characteristics (khams drug ldan). Earth, water, fire, and wind, along with the spiritual channels (rtsa) and the vital essence (thig le), are the six things that make a human being a suitable vessel for receiving the four empowerments (dbang, or Skt. abhiseka) and consequently able to practice the Vajrayana. Celestial beings from the form realm and the formless realm have subtle elements only, or none, and lack the proper support of the channels, energies (rlung), and vital essences for receiving the second and third empowerments. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

six characteristics particular to human beings. The four elements of earth, water, fire, and wind, along with the spiritual channels (rtsa) and vital essence (thig le), are the six characteristics that make a human being a suitable vessel for receiving the four empowerments (dbang, or Skt. abhiseka), and consequently for practicing the Vajrayana. Celestial beings from the form realm and the formless realm have subtle elements only, or none, and lack the proper support of the channels, energies (rlung), and vital essences, for receiving the second and third empowerments. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six clairvoyances; (mngon shes drug) : rdzul 'phrul gyi mngon par shes pa, lha'i rna ba'i mngon par shes pa, gzhan gyi sems shes pa, sngon gyi gnas rjes su dran pa, lha'i mig, zag pa zad pa'i mgnon par shes pa [MR]

SIX CLASSES OF BEINGS ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demigods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings.[AL] [RY]

Six classes of beings ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demi-gods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [RY]

six classes of beings ('gro ba rigs drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Six classes of sentient beings ('gro ba rigs drug). Gods, demigods, human beings, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [ZL] [RY]

six classes of vajrayana tantras (rgyud sde drug). Kriya, upa, yoga, maha, anu and ati. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six collections [of consciousness] (tshogs drug). The five sense consciousnesses and the mind consciousness. [RY]

six collections of consciousness (rnam shes tshogs drug); listing of; See also eight collections [LW1] [RY]

six collections; listing of; see also 'eight collections' [LWx] [RY]

six consciousnesses. The six consciousnesses are those of sight, hearing, smelling, tasting and tactile sensations, and the mental consciousness. [Peter Roberts]

six dharmas (chos drug). Also known as Six Yogas of Naropa. 1) Inner heat (gtum mo), 2) illusory body (sgyu lus), 3) dream (rmi lam), 4) luminosity ('od gsal), 5) transference of consciousness ('pho ba), 6) intermediate or transition state (bar do). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six Doctrines of Naropa (chos drug). Tummo, illusory body, dream, luminosity, bardo, and phowa. See also the 'path of means.' [RY]

six excellences (dam pa drug); listing of Mahayana practice [LW1] [RY]

six excellences; listing of [LWx] [RY]

Six great qualities (che ba drug). The sixfold greatness of the Early Translations: The sponsor who invited, the place of translation, the translators, the panditas, the offering gifts, and the translated teachings. [RY]

Six Heights of Dokham (mdo khams gang drug) (check spellings see AC I-4) 1) Zalmo Gang; (zal mo sGgng); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba /or tshap? sgang); 3) Markham Gang (rmar kham sgang); 4) Pomzer /or Powor Gang ? (spom ser /or spo 'bor? sgang); 5) Mardza Gang /or Dridza Zermo Gang?? (rma rdza /or 'bri rdza zer mo?? sgang) and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyak rab sgang). [MR]

six kinds of transmigration [LW1] [RY]

Six kleshas (nyon mongs drug). Desire, hatred and delusion in addition to pride, envy, and avarice. [RY]

Six lamps (sgron ma drug). A key term in Tögal practice. [RY]

Six limitations (mtha' drug) are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) true/ definitive meaning (nges don), 3) implied (dgongs pa can), 4) not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). [RY]

six limits (mtha' drug), detailed expl.; listing of [LW1] [RY]

SIX LIMITS (mtha' drug). The views of the expedient and definitive meaning, the implied and the not implied, the literal and the not literal. Together with the 'four modes' they form the indispensable keys for unlocking the meaning of the tantras. [AL] [RY]

six limits (mtha' drug); listing of [LWx] [RY]

six limits and four modes (mtha' drug tshul bzhi). See six limits, four modes [LW1] [RY]

Six limits and four modes (mtha' drug tshul bzhi). The indispensable keys for unlocking the meaning of the tantras. The six limits are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) definitive meaning (nges don), 3) the implied (dgongs pa can), 4) the not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) the literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) the not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). The four modes (tshul bzhi) are the 1) literal (tshig), 2) general (spyi), 3) hidden (sbas), and the 4) ultimate (mthar thug). [RY]

six limits and four modes; detailed expl. [LWx] [RY]

Six limits of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags kyi mtha' drug). The views of the expedient and definitive meaning, the implied and the not implied, the literal and the not literal. [ZL] [RY]

Six Lineage Traditions (brgyud pa'i bka' srol drug). The buddha's mind lineage, the vidyadhara's sign lineage, the oral lineage of great masters, the dakini's entrustment lineage, the empowered aspiration lineage, the yellow parchment lineage There are other alternative lists. See Tulku Thondrup's Hidden Teachings of Tibet, Wisdom Publications. [RY]

Six lineages (brgyud pa drug). See Six Lineage Traditions. [RY]

six major monastic centers for the Nyingma School in Tibet; listing [LW1] [RY]

six major monastic centers for the Nyingma tradition in Tibet; listing; [LWx] [RY]

Six million tantras (rgyud 'bum phrag drug cu). The tantras of Dzogchen received by Garab Dorje from Vajrasattva. [RY]

Six modes of exposition; ('chad pa'i mtshul drug) are: body straight, the eyebrows hightened, gazing with the eyes half closed, mouth open, with the tongue extended in between the conch-white teeth, and speaking with the melodious voice of Brahma. [MR]

six Munis (thub drug) [LWx] [RY]

six munis (thub pa drug) [LW1] [RY]

Six Ornaments and the Two Supreme Ones (rgyan drug mchog gnyis). The six ornaments are Nagarjuna, Aryadeva, Asanga, Dignaga, Vasubhandu and Dharmakirti. The two supreme ones are Shakyaprabha and Gunaprabha. [RY]

six ornaments of the world ('dzam gling rgyan drug). Six great Indian panditas, namely Nagarjuna, Asanga, Dignaga, Aryadeva, Vasubandhu, and Dharmakirti. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six Ornaments Which Beautify the Jambu Continent ('dzam gling mdzes pa'i rgyan drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Six Ornaments which Beautify the Jambu Continent; listing of [LWx] [RY]

Six paramitas (phar phyin drug). The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

SIX PARAMITAS (phar phyin drug). The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge. [AL] [RY]

six paramitas (phar phyin drug); definite number; definition of; different types of; four special qualities [LW1] [RY]

six paramitas. The six transcendent actions of generosity, discipline, patience, diligence, concentration, and discriminating knowledge.[Primer] [RY]

six paramitas; definite number; definition of; different types of; expl.; four special qualities; four special qualities (khyad chos bzhi) [LWx] [RY]

six periods of the day. The early, middle and later parts of the daytime and the night-time.The three periods being those of the daytime. [Peter Roberts]

six periods of the day: are the early, middle and late part of the day-time, and the early, middle and late part of the night-time. [Peter Roberts]

Six Ranges of Dokham (smad mdo khams sgang drug), which are 1) Zalmo Gang (zal mo sgang); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba sgang); 3) Markham Gang (smar khams sgang); 4) Powor Gang (spo 'bor sgang); 5) Mardza Gang (dmar rdza sgang); and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyag rab sgang). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

six ranges of dokham (smad mdo khams sgang drug). According to AC, vol.1, p.4, these are 1) Zalmo Gang (zal mo sgang); 2) Tsawa Gang (tsha ba sgang); 3) Markham Gang (smar khams sgang); 4) Powor Gang (spo 'bor sgang); 5) Mardza Gang (dmar rdza sgang) and 6) Minyak Rabgang (mi nyag rab sgang). See CN, p.* [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six realms (gnas ris drug). The realms of the six classes of beings. [RY]

Six realms (rigs drug gi gnas). The worlds of gods, demigods, humans, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

six realms/classes of sentient beings ('gro ba rigs drug). 1) Celestial beings (lha), 2) antigods or demi-gods (lha ma yin), 3) human beings (mi), 4) animals (dud 'gro), 5) tormented spirits (yi dwags), and 6) denizens of the hells (dmyal ba). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six recollections (rjes dran drug). There are different lists of which the most appropriate is: Recollection of the yidam deity, the path, the place of rebirth, the meditative state, the oral instructions of the teacher, and the view. [RY]

Six recollections (rjes dran drug). There are different lists, of which the most appropriate is: Recollection of the yidam deity, the path, the place of rebirth, the meditative state, the oral instructions of the teacher, and the view. In his Great Pointing-out Instruction of the Four Bardo States, Padmasambhava mentions these recollections: "By remembering the yidam deity you behold the countenance of the peaceful and wrathful deities of the three kayas. By remembering the path you gain mastery over the innate nature in the bardo. By remembering the place of rebirth you are reborn in a nirmanakaya realm even though you may be of the inferior type of capacity. By remembering the meditation state you remain in meditation for five days. By remembering the master's oral instructions you realize that your personal experience is unimpeded wakefulness. By remembering the view you realize that the spontaneous presence is the mandala of sambhogakaya. Like meeting a person you already know, you recognize your natural face." [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

six related causes of dependent origination [LW1] [RY]

six related causes; [LWx] [RY]

six related conditions of dependent origination [LW1] [RY]

six related conditions; [LWx] [RY]

Six Ridges of Lower Dokham; listing of [LW1] [RY]

Six Ridges; listing of [LWx] [RY]

six root disturbances (rtsa nyon drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]

six root disturbances; listing of [LWx] [RY]

Six Sadhana Sections (sgrub pa sde drug). The phrasing of these six types of scripture differs slightly among the various versions of Chronicles of Padmasambhava's life. In his Narration of the Precious Revelation of the Terma Treasures, Longchen Rabjam rephrases the same sequence from the Sanglingma so that the Six Sadhana Sections refer to the six scriptures mentioned just above. In that way they are equal to the Six Secret Sections (gsang ba sde drug) including the scriptures for Manjushri Body, Lotus Speech, Vishuddha Mind, Nectar Quality, Kilaya Activity, and Liberating Sorcery of Mother Deities. [ZL] [RY]

Six Sala Lek (sa la legs drug) [LW1] [RY]

Six Scriptures on Reasoning (rigs tshogs drug) [LW1] [RY]

Six Secret Sections (gsang ba sde drug). Listed in Chapter 12. The five first are found in the most common list of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

six sections of Tantra (rgyud sde drug) [LW1] [RY]

six sense bases (skye mched drug); See also aggregates, elements, and sense bases [LW1] [RY]

Six sense cognitions (rnam shes tshogs drug). A synonym for 'six sense perceptions.' [RY]

Six sense faculties (dbang po drug). The five senses and the mental faculty. [RY]

six sense perceptions (tshogs drug gi snang ba). Sights, sounds, smells, tastes, tactile sensations, and mental events. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Six sense perceptions (tshogs drug gi snang ba). The experiences of sights, sounds, smells, tastes, textures and mental objects. [RY]

Six Spheres (klong drug pa). See also Tantra of the Six Spheres of Samantabhadra [LW1] [RY]

Six Spheres (klong drug pa); expl.; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Six Spheres. (klong drug pa), one of the 17 Dzogchen tantras. [RY]

Six Stains (dri ma drug). [RY]

Six stains {dri ma drug}. Pride, lack of faith, lack of effort, outward distraction, inward tension and discouragement. [RY]

six superior qualities of the Nyingma School, listing of [LW1] [RY]

six superior qualities; of the Nyingma School, listing of [LWx] [RY]

Six Superknowledges (mngon par shes pa drug). The capacities for performing miracles, divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, and the cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.[AL] [RY]

six superknowledges (mngon shes drug); listing [LW1] [RY]

Six Syllables (yi ge drug pa). The mantra of Avalokiteshvara: om mani padme hung. [RY]

Six Syllables [LW1] [RY]

Six tantra sections (rgyud sde drug) The three outer tantras of Kriya, Upa and Yoga and the three inner tantras of Maha, Anu and Ati. [RY]

Six transcending actions (pha rol tu phyin pa drug). See 'six paramitas.' [RY]

Six transcending perfections {pha rol tu phyin pa drug}. Generosity, moral discipline, patience, diligence, concentration and discriminating awareness. [RY]

Six Treatises of the Kadampas (bka' gdams gzhung drug):, mdo sde rgyan /(some have nyan thos pa'i sa), byang chub sems dpa'i sa, bslab pa kun btus, spyod 'jug, skyes rabs, ched du brjod pa'i tshoms [MR]

six unions (sbyor ba drug) [LW1] [RY]

Six Unions (sbyor drug). One of the Eight Great Chariots of the Practice Lineage embodying the pith instruction for the practice of Kalachakra.[EMP] [RY]

Six Unions (sbyor drug). See Jordruk. [RY]

Six Vajra Lines (rdo rje tshig rkang drug). The supplication to Guru Rinpoche called Dusum Sangye. [RY]

Six Vajra Lines (rdo rje'i tshig drug). [ZL] [RY]

Six views (mtha' drug) are the views of the 1) expedient meaning (drang don), 2) true/ definitive meaning (nges don), 3) implied (dgongs pa can), 4) not implied (dgongs pa can ma yin pa), 5) literal (sgra ji bzhin pa), and 6) not literal (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa). [RY]

Six ways of expounding the inner tantras; ('chad pa'i mtha' drug), as mentioned in the rgyud gal po che: (1) According to the conventional meaning /truth (drang don), (2) Ultimate certain meaning /truth (nges don), (3) With a hidden meaning behind intellible words which have an ordinary meaning (dgons pa can), (4) In a explicit way, without hidden meaning (dgons min), (5) In ordinary words of common language (sgra ji bzhin pa), and (6) in symbolic words arranged in sentences which makes no sense without a key for their understanding (sgra ji bzhin ma yin pa) (YNO, p. 24-26) [MR]

six wealths. The six wealths are: Long life; great power; good fortune; great majesty; great retinue; many possessions. [Peter Roberts]

Six worlds ('jig rten drug). The realms of the six classes of beings. [RY]

Six Yogas (rnal 'byor drug). See 'Six Doctrines of Naropa.' [RY]

Six Yogas {chos drug}. The yoga of psychic heat {gtum mo}; the yoga of the illusory body {sgyu lus}; the yoga of dream {rmi lam}; the yoga of luminosity {'od gsal}; the yoga of consciousness transference {'pho ba} and the yoga of the intermediate state {bar do}. [RY]

Six Yogas of Naropa with the Three Confidences, this refers to the zab lam na ro chos drug gi khrid rim yid ches gsum ldan of Tsongkhapa. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sixfold taking as path (lam khyer drug). [RY]

Six-fold Vajra Yoga - This refers to the six branches of practice according to the Kalachakra (dus 'khor sbyor ba yan lag drug). See DZ, Vol. 16 and NS, vol. 2, p.151. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sixteen Abodes of the Realm of Form (gzugs khams gnas rigs bcu drug) [LW1] [RY]

Sixteen arhants (gnas brtan bcu drug). Also known as the Sixteen Sthaviras. [RY]

Sixteen Arhats -() Disciples of the Buddha who vowed to preserve the Dharma until the coming of Maitreya [RY]

sixteen moments (skad cig ma bcu drug); listing of [LW1] [RY]

Sixteen Spheres (thig le bcu drug) is a renowned sadhana which belongs to the pith instructions (man ngag) section of the Kadampa tradition. Avalokitesvara is visualized with sixteen other deities in his heart, one within the other, and each one in a sphere of light. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

sixteen vowels and thirty consonants; listing of, see also 'Ali Kali]' [LW1] [RY]

Sixth Buddha (rgyal ba drug pa). Refers to Vajradhara. [RY]

Sixth Buddha Regent (drug pa'i rgyal tshab) [LW1] [RY]

Sixth Buddha Regent; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

Sixth Dalai Lama 1., Tsangyang Gyatso:6th; 1683-1702: Gushri Khan (Qosot Mongol prince) defeats the Tsangpa Ruler Karma Tenkyong Wangpo in 1642, and with the help of Desi Sönam Chopel unifies Tibet under the rule of the 5th Dalai Lama. Gushri Khan dies in Lhasa at the eage of 73, in 1675. Sönam Chopel dies in 1676 and is replaced by Desi Sangye Gyatso; in 1679, (after the resignation of Desi Losang Jinpa) at the age of 29. Nicknamed Desi Golep he was a great erudite, a tireless administrator and sometime a ruthless leader. When the great 5th passed away in 1682 this fact was concealed from the people for many years. Secretely too, the Desi had send parties to find the new incarnation, and in 1685, an extraordinary child, born in 1683 to a reputed Nyingma Tantric family descended from the damed Tertön Padma Lingpa;, was found in Tawang, Mön-yul. [RY]

Sixth Dalai Lama 2. In August 1697 annoucement was made of both the demise of the 5th Dalai Lama and of the finding of his reicarnation. The 2nd Panchen. Losang Yeshe was invited to Nagartse and gave to the young Dalai Lama the novice vows and the name Losang Rigzin Tsan-yang Gyatso, in 1697. In October 1687, the Sixth Dalai Lama was enthroned in Lhasa. The young Dalai Lama turned to be a simple, gifted, artist, and carefree young man, who disliked the pomp of Potala, and preferred mingling with the daily life of his people, walking instead of riding horse and enjoying the charm of nature. Leading a most simple life he would make his own tea and share it with anyone who would come to receive his audience. He would teach in public places and not in the magnificent Potala. Pressed by the Desi and the Panchen Lama to take full monastic vows, to everyone bewilderment, Tsang-yang Gyatso returned instead the novice vows he had receive earlier. From then on he lived as a lay yogin. Condensed from: Songs of the Sixth Dalai Lama, Translated from the Tibetan by K.Dhondup, Library of Tibetan Works and Archives Dharamsala, 1981 [MR]

Sixth Dalai Lama, Tsangyang Gyatso (tshangs dbyangs rgya mtsho, 1683-1702) and the regent-king, Desi Sangye Gyatso (sde srid sangs rgyas rgya mtsho, 1653-1703). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sixth Rigdzin Chenpo of Dorje Drak, Kunzang Gyurme Lhundrup (rdor brag 'rig 'dzin chen po kun bzang 'gyur med lhun grub). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

sixty aspects of melodious speech (gsung dbyangs yan lag drug bcu) [LW1] [RY]

Sixty aspects of speech (gsung dbyangs yan lag drug cu), according to Tantra, there are six categories: like the voice of Brahma, cymbals, song, the kalapinga bird, thunder, and a sitar. There are sixty aspects when each of them are multiplied by these ten: generating understanding, comprehensible, being worthy of respect, without discord, extremely profound, acceptable, indomitable, pleasing to hear, unconfused, and extremely distinct. [RY]

Sixty Verses of Reasoning; Yuktisastika-karika; (rigs pa drug cu pa); Nagarjuna, 1st-2nd century. [PK] [RY]

Sixty-eight Crescents (zla gam drug cu rtsa brgyad). Name of a mandala connected to the teachings of Vishuddha Heruka. [ZL] [RY]

sixty-four qualities of freedom and maturation (bral smin yan tan drug cu rtsa bzhi) [LW1] [RY]

sixty-four sacred places and countries (gnas yul drug cu rtsa bzhi) [LW1] [RY]

Skanda (skem byed). Skanda is the Brahmanical god of war, leader of demons that cure illness in children, and the god of thieves. The skandas' are no doubt these demons, however the Tib. name, which means 'drier-up', is puzzling. [RY]

Skandha (phung po). [RY]

Skandhas (phung po). Gathering or aggregation of many parts. See 'five skandhas/ aggregates.' [RY]

skandhas, dhatus and ayatanas. Skandhas: (Tibetan: phung po) "Aggregations". The five aggregations: physical forms, sensations, identification, mental activities (within which the second and third aggregates are in fact included) and consciousnesses. / Dhatus: (Tibetan - khams) "Elements". The eighteen elements of mental and sensory experience: The six consciousnesses of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and the mind; the faculty of perception of these six; and the objects experienced by them - form, sound, smell, taste, physical sensation and "[mental] phenomena". / Ayatanas: (Tibetan - skye mched) "Birth and Development" are the twelve sources of perception, in fact the last twelve of the list of dhatus, the consciousnesses not being included in the ayatanas. These are all derived from the abhidharma teachings. [Peter Roberts]

Skandhas, the five aggregates (phung po lnga). The five aspects which comprise the physical and mental constituents of a sentient being: physical forms, sensations, conceptions, formations, and consciousnesses.[Primer] [RY]

Skillful Lasso (thabs kyi zhags pa). Also known as Concise Lotus Garland (pad mo phreng ba'i don bsdus pa), this scripture functions as a support for rituals to attain accomplishment. See Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Skillful means (thabs la mkhas pa). Ingenuity in application. [RY]

Skillful means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab). The two main aspects of any practice. In Mahayana practice, they are compassion and insight into emptiness. In Vajrayana practice, they are the stages of development and completion. [RY]

Skipping the grades type (thod rgal ba'i rigs). People whose qualities of experience and realization increase and decrease without sequential order. [RY]

skull bowl that possesses all the ideal qualities. There are various signs that indicate a powerfully auspicious skull-bowl, the most important of which is one in which the entire skull is one piece, without being divided into sections by the lines of cranial joints. [Peter Roberts]

Skull Pieces (thod pa'i dum bu) [LW1] [RY]

skull-damaru, and so on. A skull-damaru is made of the tops of two crania, though more commonly a damaru made of wood or ivory in the shape of the crania is used. A skull with particular qualities is considered to naturally assist in the gaining of spiritual accomplishments if used in one's practice. [Peter Roberts]

Sky burial - In Tibet corpses are cut up in a special way, so that the vultures can feed on them. It was considered inauspicious if vultures did not come, or came but did not eat the corpse. The corpses are sometimes dismembered by monks or, in populated areas, by professionals. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sky Dancer, Namkhai Nyingpo, by Keith Dowman, Rutledge & Kegan-Paul, London. [ZL] [RY]

Sky Plain (gung thang). [ZL] [RY]

Sky Plain of Lhaitsa (gnam thang lha'i rtsa). [ZL] [RY]

Sky Plain Pass (gung thang la kha). [ZL] [RY]

Sky Treasury Consecration Tantra (nam mkha' mdzod byin rlabs kyi rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Sky Treasury Consecration Tantra (nam mkha' mdzod byin rlabs kyi rgyud). The word sky treasury has the connotation of inexhaustible wealth. [ZL] [RY]

sky-burial - Only the corpses of Dharma practitioners and special persons were actually cremated in Tibet. Others were given "sky-burial"; their corpses were cut up and fed to the vultures. People believed that the smoke from the cremation of ordinary bodies would defile the sky realm of the local deities and mountain gods. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sky-faced One (gnam zhal ma). The consort of Kalden Drendsey. [RY]

Sky-Iron Vajra". "The Sky-Iron Vajra" (gnam lcags rdo rje) is the second of Jatson Nyingpo's volumes of termas, devoted to long-life practice. [Peter Roberts]

Sky-soarer, khe-cara, (mkha' la spyod pa). 'One who goes in the air', deity, dakini; also conceivably Khasarpana, a form of Avalokiteshvara. [RY]

Slate Mountain Ridge (g.ya ri gong). [ZL] [RY]

Slaughter Rakshas (bshan pa srin po). [ZL] [RY]

Slayer of Demons (bdud kyi bshed chen). One of the 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. Same as Dükyi Shechen. [RY]

Sle kug bzhad pa'i rdo rje: 5th incarnation of lho brag grub chen. Wrote many volumes related to the mkha' 'gro gsang ba ye shes of smin gling and chos rje gling pa. [MR]

smoke-offerings. Smoke-pujas: (bsangs), meaning a cleansing of the area through aromatic incenses. brngan, the second syllable means "payment" referring to the act of making a gift to local deities in lieu of their activity of protection) A native Tibetan tradition of burning aromatic auspicious wood, such as cedar, but to create smoke rather than flames, with various offerings of food, cloth, etc. added. It is used to make an offering to all the Three roots and Jewels and to make a gift to all beings in Samsara. The emphasis in this practice (which also demonstrates its origins) is on local and national deities, to please and appease them, the smoke cleansing the area as well as manifesting offerings. [Peter Roberts]

smoke-pujas. Smoke-pujas: (Tibetan: bsangs, meaning a cleansing of the area through aromatic incenses) A native Tibetan tradition of burning aromatic auspicious wood, such as cedar, but to create smoke rather than flames, with various offerings of food, cloth, etc. added. It is used to make an offering to all the Three roots and Jewels and to make a gift to all beings in Samsara. The emphasis in this practice (which also demonstrates its origins) is on local and national deities, to please and appease them, the smoke cleansing the area as well as manifesting offerings. [Peter Roberts]

Smritijnana [LW1] [RY]

Smrtijnanakirti - Pandita who entered Tibet from Nepal at the start of the second period of transmission, early in the eleventh century [RY]

snake-essence (sbrul gyi snying po). Some snakes are said to have a jewel in their forehead that is called "snake-essence" (sbrul gyi snying po). By extension, "snake-essence" is used to refer to very precious things, here to a rare kind of sandalwood. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

snow grouse or Tibetan partridge (gong mo, Lat. Perdrix Hodgsoniae). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Snow Mountain of Tö - Mount Kailash. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

So Zur Nub Nyang (so zur bsnubs nyag). Great masters in the Nyingma lineage. [RY]

Socrates: 399 BC [MR]

Sog po mda' bcu gcig: A rig etc,. Main distinctions in Golok: mgo log, dbal shul, mdzod dge nyin rsib. [MR]

Sogdians - Traders and scribes who played an important role in transmitting the Dharma throughout Central Asia [RY]

Soglung (srog rlung), an illness caused by prana getting stuck in the heart center due to various strenuous circumstances. [RY]

Sogpo Tendar (mkhas grub sog po bstan dar): 1759- [MR]

Sole Mother, Machik Labdrön (ma gcig lab sgron, 1055-1153), who, with Padampa Sangye (pha dam pa sangs rgyas, d.1117), initiated in Tibet the lineage of the practice of Chöd (gcod), which means "cutting through" ego-clinging and other attachments. In this practice, based on the view of the Prajnaparamita, one visualizes offering one's body to the "four classes of guests" (mgron po bzhi) which are: (1) the Three Jewels, the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas who elicit faith and respect, (2) the protectors of the Dharma who are endowed with good qualities, (3) sentient beings who deserve our compassion, and (4) negative harmful spirits to whom we must repay karmic debts. On the history of Chöd see J. Gyatso (1989). On translations of Machik's biographies see A. Tempa Gyaltsen et al. (1990) and J. Edou (1993). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sole Ornament of the Five Families of Vajrasattva (rdor sems rigs lnga rgyan gcig) is the peaceful aspect of the Taktsang Phurba cycle. See RT vol.31 (Ki) and note 54 above. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Solkha. [RY]

Somo Tsang. [RY]

Son - Korean form of Ch'an teachings that became one of the major forms of Korean Buddhism [RY]

Sona - One of the missionaries of Ashoka's time sent to Suvarnabhumi, identified with Burma in the Burmese tradition [RY]

Sönam Gyatso: 1543-1588. [RY]

Sönam Tashi: 1352-1412 [MR]

Sönam Tsemo (bsod nams rtse mo) :1142-1182. One of the Five Sakya Forefathers. [RY]

Sönam Tsemo(bsod nams rtse mo), son of Kunga Nyingpo: 1142-1182 [MR]

Songnor Rinpoche. [RY]

Songpo Labpey. [RY]

Songtsen Gampo (srong btsan sgam po). (569-650) or (617-650). The king of Tibet in the seventh century Tibetan who prepared the way for transmission of the teachings. He is regarded as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara. He married Bhrikuti of Nepal and Wen Cheng of China who each brought a sacred statue of Buddha Shakyamuni to Lhasa. Songtsen Gampo built the first Buddhist temples in Tibet, established a code of laws based on Dharma principles, and had his minister Thönmi Sambhota develop the Tibetan script. During his reign the translation of Buddhist texts into Tibetan began. [ZL] [RY]

Songtsen Gampo / Srong btsan sgam po - Seventh century Tibetan Dharma king who prepared the way for transmission of the teachings; regarded as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara [RY]

Songtsen Gampo / Srong btsan sgom po (7th century) first great Dharma King, who united the Tibetan Kingdom. He married two Buddhist princesses, Bhrikuti of Nepal and Wen ch'eng of China. He built the first Buddhist temples, established a code of laws based on Dharma principles, developed the Tibetan script with the help of his minister Thon mi Sambhota and also began the translation of Buddhist texts into Tibetan. Srong btsan sgam po was succeeded by: Gung srong, Mang srong, 'dus srong, and Khri lde gtsug btsan (Mes ag tshoms) [RY]

Songtsen Gampo [LW1] [RY]

Songtsen Gampo: 609- 649/698?. [RY]

Songtsen Gampo: 609-698, according to Gendun Chöphel: 617-650 (see White Annals p.13) [MR]

Songtsen Gampo; [LWx] [RY]

Söpa Gyatso is the first Khardo Rinpoche. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sopo Tendar: 1759-. [RY]

Sosaling (so sa gling). [ZL] [RY]

Sosaling. [Daki] [RY]

Sotokpa Lodrö Gyaltsen (Sog bzlog pa blo gros rgyal mtshan): 1552- [MR]

Sounds, colors and lights (sgra 'od zer gsum). The first manifestations in the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

space (dbyings). See dharmadhatu [LW1] [RY]

Space dissolving in luminosity (nam mkha' 'od gsal la thim pa). The dividing point between the bardo of dying and the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

Space Section (klong sde). A division of Dzogchen emphasizing emptiness. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Space sections {klong sde}. Aspect of the Dzogchen tantras. [RY]

space; explanation of space as buddha nature [LWx] [RY]

Spear-Wielding Criminal (mi nag gdung thung can) [LW1] [RY]

Special Aphorisms (mched du brjod pa); aspect of excellent speech [LW1] [RY]

Special inner preliminaries (thun min nang gi sngon 'gro). See preliminaries. [RY] Special inner preliminaries of four times one-hundred thousand (thun min nang gi sngon 'gro 'bum bzhi). Same as 'special preliminaries.' [RY]

special path; in regard to the dhyanas [LW1] [RY]

Special preliminaries (thun min gyi sngon 'gro). Taking refuge, arousing bodhicitta, recitation and meditation of Vajrasattva, mandala offerings, and guru yoga. For further details see 'Torch of Certainty,' Shambhala Publications, or 'The Great Gate,' Rangjung Yeshe Publications, 1988. [RY]

special stage of dhyana (bsam gtan khyad par ba) [LW1] [RY]

special stage of dhyana [LWx] [RY]

Special Tradition of Mantrayana [LWx] [RY]

speech (gsung); listing five types of enlightened speech [LW1] [RY]

speech; listing five types of enlightened speech [LWx] [RY]

Spiral of Auspiciousness: the lha rnams mnyes par byed pa'i bsangs mchod bkra shis 'khyil ba, written by the fifth Dalai Lama. This is a text for the ritual of smoke-offering (bsangs), which is made by burning leaves and branches of fragrant trees such as juniper and rhododendron, mixed with blessed ingredients. Boundless offerings, filling the sky, are visualized in the smoke and are offered to the "four classes of guests" (see Author's Introduction, note 32). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Spirits, bhuta, ('byung po; also graha, gdon; mi ma yin); malignant beings of the preta class, ghosts etc. [RY]

Spiritual Friend, kalyana mitra, (bshes gnyen dam pa) (dge ba'i bshes gnyen). Guru. [RY]

Spiritual Friend, kalyana mitra, (dge ba'i bshes gnyen) or (bshes gnyen dam pa). Guru. [RY]

Spiritual life-force (thugs srog). The seed syllable usually in the heart center of the deity. [RY]

Splendor, Peak, and Space (dpal rtse dbyings gsum) [LW1] [RY]

Splendorous Realm (dpal dang ldan pa). The buddhafield of Ratnasambhava. [RY]

Spontaneous Fulfillment of Wishes (bsam pa lhun grub). A supplication to Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Spontaneous presence (lhun grub). One of the two main aspects of Dzogchen teaching, the other being 'primordial purity' (ka dag). [RY]

Spontaneous sound of dharmata (chos nyid kyi rang sgra). One of the first displays in the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

Spontaneous Summit Scripture (rtse mo byung rgyal gyi lung). One of the Eighteen Major Scriptures of the Mind Section of Dzogchen. Vol. KA of the Nyingma Gyübam. [ZL] [RY]

Spontaneously Accomplished Mound (lhun grub brtsegs); charnel ground [LW1] [RY]

Spontaneously present luminosity of the rupakayas (gzugs sku lhun grub kyi 'od gsal). The display during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

Sporting Devourer Tantra (za byed rol pa'i rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Spreading the Light of Wisdom [LW1] [RY]

Sri Lanka - The island kingdom south of India; an early home of the Dharma; also known as Ceylon and Simhaladvipa [RY]

Stages of development and completion (bskyed rdzogs kyi rim pa). The two main aspect of Vajrayana practice. [RY]

stages of the path (lam rim); common for people of lesser capacity; common for people of medium capacity; common for people of superior capacity [LW1] [RY]

stages of the path common for people of lesser capacity; expl. [LWx] [RY]

stages of the path common for people of medium capacity; detailed expl. [LWx] [RY]

Stages of the path for the three kinds of individuals (byang chub lam gyi rim pa). Perfect faith is the path of the lesser individual, perfect renunciation is the path of the mediocre individual and perfect altruism is the path of the superior individual. [RY]

Stages of the Path for the Three Kinds of Individuals (skyes bu gsum gyi lam rim) [LW1] [RY] Stages of the Path for the Three Kinds of Individuals, Tsongkhapa's greater and lesser (skyes bu gsum gyi lam rim). [RY]

Stages of the Path of Enlightenment (byang chub lam gyi rim pa) [LW1] [RY]

Stages of the path of Mantra called "a ro'i theg chen rnal 'byor". [RY]

stages of the path; definition of; [LWx] [RY]

Stages, Ten (bhumi, sa). The successive steps in the career of an Arya Bodhisattva; Buddhahood is attained from the Tenth Stage. A Master of the T.S. is thus an Arya bodhisattva or a Buddha. [RY]

Stages, two (krama, rim (pa)). Anuttara yoga tantra is divided into two main Stages, first the Stage of Generation, then when that is perfected, the Completing Stage. [RY]

Stainless (dri ma med pa). The second of the ten bhumis. [RY]

Stainless Sutra (dri ma med pa'i mdo). [RY]

Stainless; bhumi [LW1] [RY]

Stains (mala, dri ma). Sometimes = the three poisons. [RY]

state of passion (chags rtog gnas skabs) [LW1] [RY]

Statement and Realization. See Dharma of Statement and Realization [LW1] [RY]

Statements and realization (lung rtogs). The authoritative scriptures and the realization of the Dharma in the minds of noble beings. [RY]

statements. See tantras, statements, and instructions; more details of [LW1] [RY]

Sthavira (gnas brtan pa)- School of the Elders, one of the earliest Buddhist schools, usually contrasted to the Mahasamghika [RY]

Sthiramati - Disciple of Vasubandhu famed for his mastery of Abhidharma [RY]

Stillness (gnas pa). Absence of thought activity and disturbing emotions, but with subtle fixation on this stillness. [RY]

stillness. See shamatha [LW1] [RY]

Stirring from the sleep of ignorance (ma rig gnyid skrog). See 'awakening from the sleep of ignorance.' [RY]

Storehouse Tantra (bang mdzod kyi rgyud). [EMP] [RY]

stream of being (rgyud, sems rgyud). [LW1] [RY]

Stream of Wealth Goddess (nor rgyun ma). Name of a Mahayana sutra. [ZL] [RY]

Stream-of-being (rgyud), (sems rgyud). The individual continuity of cognition in an individual sentient being. [ZL] [RY]

Stream-of-being (sems rgyud) (rgyud),. The individual continuity of cognition in an individual sentient being. [ZL] [RY]

stretcher. "Stretcher": The literal definition of the word is "that which is used for carrying the sick". The Tibetan in the text actually gives two names: "do li" and "khyogs" which are in fact synonymous. A third synonym also exists: "phebs byams". The word "do li" should not be confused with the purely colloquial word which means bull's testicles! This has been known to occur! The term refers to the line of mantras carrying the blessings from the deity to yourself. [Peter Roberts]

Stuffed dummy - glud, an effigy which is a rough representation of a person offered as ransom in place of the person himself in a ritual for averting premature death. See chap.6, note 43. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Stupa - At the center of a stupa one puts a life-tree (srog shing) as its central axis. It is cut square and placed in the stupa, facing the same way as it grew in the wild. One writes on it various mantras and prayers, and one attaches precious relics to it. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Stupa - see mChod rten. [RY]

Stupa (mchod rten). A dome-shaped monument housing relics of the Buddha or an accomplished master. The shape of the stupa embodies an elaborate symbolism. [ZL] [RY]

Stupa of Great Purity (mchod rten rnam dag) is the stupa in front of which Sakyamuni cut his hair and vowed to renounce the world. Some place it near Ramagama, east of Kapilavistu (see Lamotte, 1958), and others near Mankapur in Uttar Pradesh (see NS Vol.2 p. 30, n. 400), or near Bodhgaya itself. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Stupa, mchod rten (Skt. stupa) lit. 'foundation of offering'; monuments often containing relics of Buddhist saints. Stupas are built according to universal principles of harmony and order. Often quite large, they focus and radiate healing energy throughout the six realms of existence. [RY]

Stupidity-meditation (blun sgom). [RY]

Style of the Trikaya Jewel (sku gsum nor bu'i lugs). The manner of visualization in which the root guru is regarded as the embodiment of the three kayas. [RY]

Subahu (lag bzang) [LW1] [RY]

Sub-aspects of the nonvirtuous actions (mi dge ba'i yan lag). The sub-aspects of killing are to hit, beat or suppress others etc. The sub-aspects of stealing from others are to profiteer in business, soliciting and being pretentious etc. The sub-aspects of sexual misconduct are wanton talk etc. The other sub-aspects are shown through these examples. [RY]

Subduer of Mara (bdud 'dul ma). [ZL] [RY]

Subhuti [LW1] [RY]

Subjugating mantras (drag snags). Mantras of wrathful deities. [ZL] [RY]


Subjugating, subduing (vashya, dbang (du bsdu ba)). Rite for summoning or controlling another person. [RY]

sublime purity, bliss, identity, and permanence (gtsang bde bdag rtag dam pa) [LW1] [RY]

Sublime Vision (gya nom snang) [LW1] [RY]

subsequent intellect [LWx] [RY]

subsequent mind (de ma thag yid) [LW1] [RY]

Subsequent Tantra of the Bathing Elephant (glang po chur 'jug gi rgyud phyi ma). [EMP] [RY]

Subsequent True Enlightenment Tantra (phyi ma mngon par byang chub pa'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. found in Vol OM of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Subsidiary empowerments (yan lag gi dbang). [RY]

Substance of accomplishment (dngos grub kyi rdzas). The shrine articles such as amrita and torma of which a small portion is partaken of on the morning of the last day of a retreat practice. [RY]

Succession of Former Lives (skyes pa'i rabs); aspect of excellent speech [LW1] [RY]

Suchandra (chos rgyal zla ba bzang po) [LW1] [RY] Suchness (de bzhin nyid), Skt. tattva. Synonym for emptiness or the 'nature of things,' dharmata, it can also be used to describe the unity of dependent origination and emptiness. [ZL] [RY]

suchness (de bzhin nyid); defiled (dri bcas); in relation to sugata essence; tatha [LW1] [RY]

Suchness (Skt. tattva, de bzhin nyid). Synonym for emptiness or the 'nature of things,' dharmata, it can also be used to describe the unity of dependent origination and emptiness. [RY]

Suchness (tattva, de kho na nyid). Ultimate Nature, lack of true existence. [RY]

Suchness samadhi (de bzhin nyid kyi ting nge 'dzin). The first of the three samadhis. [RY]

sudden jump (thod rgal) [LW1] [RY]

Sudden jump, (thod rgal), here means to jump to a higher level while skipping the grades or steps in between. [RY]

Suddhodhana - King of the Sakyas; father of Sakyamuni Buddha. [Tarthang] suffering (sdug bsngal); explanation of the three types of; of change; of formations; of suffering [LW1] [RY]

Suffering of change ('gyur ba'i sdug bsngal). 'That which is pleasant when arising and remaining but painful when ceasing.' Mainly the suffering of the three higher realms. [RY]

suffering of formations; all-pervasive, expl. [LWx] [RY]

Suffering upon suffering (sdug bsngal gyi sdug bsngal). 'That which is painful when arising and remaining but pleasant when ceasing.' Mainly the suffering of the three lower realms. [RY]

Sugata (bde (bar) gshegs (pa), bder gshegs). 'One who has fared well', i.e. A Buddha. [RY]

Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' Same as a buddha.[Primer] [RY]

Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' 1) The historical Buddha Shakyamuni. 2) Any fully enlightened being. [ZL] [RY]

Sugata (bde bar gshegs pa). 'Blissfully gone.' Same as a buddha. [RY]

Sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po) applies to the aspect of the mind essence present as the indivisibility of the [two] truths as itself the essence of buddhahood. [RY]

Sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po). Another word for buddha nature, the enlightened essence inherent in sentient beings. [RY]

sugata essence (bde gshegs snying po); as unfabricated continuous instant; definition of; explanation of five special qualities; four qualities of; in relation to the all-ground; in terms of essence, nature, and capacity; in terms of ignorance; in terms of Proponents of Concrete Existence; nine analogies for; qualities in terms of fruition; root text definition of; synonyms for; synonyms in general context; synonyms in Vajrayana context; three reasons for [LW1] [RY]

Sugatagarbha (bde bar gshegs pa'i snying po). 'Sugata essence.' The most common Sanskrit term for what in the West is known as 'buddha nature.' [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

sugatagarbha. See sugata essence [LW1] [RY]

Sugatas' Offspring, sugata suta, (bde gshegs sras po). Bodhisattva. [RY]

Sugatas: "Those who have gone to Bliss". An epithet of the Buddhas. [Peter Roberts]

Sukha Dharma (bde chen chos sgron). The consort of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Sukhavati (bde ba can) [LW1] [RY]

Sukhavati (bde ba can) is the Pure Realm of Buddha Amitabha; [MR-ShabkarNotes]

sukhavati (bde ba can) The western buddha field of Amitabha. [Rain of Wisdom]

Sukhavati (bde ba can). 'Blissful Realm.' The pure realm of Buddha Amitabha. [ZL] [RY]

Sukhavati (bde ba can). 'Blissful', n. of Amitabha's Pure Land. [RY]

SUKHAVATI (bde ba can). See 'Blissful Realm.'[AL] [RY]

Sukhavati, the Blissful Realm (bde ba can) etc is celestial, [RY]

Sulphuk (zul phug). [ZL] [RY]

Sülpo (srul po). A type of hideous hungry ghost. [ZL] [RY]

Sum of the Great Vehicle, theg pa chen po'i mdo bsdu pa [MR]

Sumeru - see Meru. [RY]

Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the four continents. See 'Meru.' [RY]

Sumeru, Mount (ri rab). = Meru [RY]

Summit (rtse mo). One of the 'four aspects of ascertainment' on the path of joining. [RY]

summit of existence (srid pa'i rtse mo) [LW1] [RY]

Summit of existence (srid pa'i rtse mo). The highest of the four formless realms. [RY]

Summit Tantra of Letterless Great Space (nam mkha' che yi ge med pa rtse mo'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY] sun and moon box (nyi zla ga'u). This is in the form of a small, round box, the lower half being white (made of the moon) and the upper half, or lid, being red (made of the sun). [Peter Roberts]

Sun and Moon Union Tantra (nyi zla kha sbyor). One of the 17 Dzogchen tantras. [RY]

Sundha Jnanaya (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

Superficial truth (kun rdzob kyi bden pa). [RY]

Superior Body (lus 'phags po); Continent [LW1] [RY]

superior indivisibility of the two truths (lhag pa'i bden gnyis dbyer med) [LW1] [RY]

superior intention (lhag bsam); definition of; of bodhichitta; on the path of accumulation [LW1] [RY]

Superknowledge (mngon par shes pa). Usually refers to the six 'higher perceptions' including clairvoyance, knowledge of other's minds etc. See 'six superknowledges.' [RY]

Superknowledge (mngon shes). Divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, capacity for performing miracles, and, in the case of accomplished practitioners, the 'cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.' [ZL] [RY]

Superknowledges (mngon shes). Divine sight, divine hearing, recollection of former lives, cognition of the minds of others, capacity for performing miracles, and, in the case of accomplished practitioners, the 'cognition of the exhaustion of defilements.'[EMP] [RY]

superknowledges (mngon shes). See also six superknowledges; six; listing [LW1] [RY]

Superknowledges, five or six (abhijna, mngon shes). The s. of magical power (of levitation, transmutation and control of one's feelings), divine hearing, knowing other's thoughts, remembering past lives, and knowing the death and rebirth of sentient beings; and (in Arhants and Buddhas only) knowledge of the exhaustion of the contaminations. [RY]

supplementary numbers. Supplementary numbers are in order to make good any mantras that may not have been correctly recited. Traditionally, the supplementary numbers are a tenth of the total, then a tenth of that tenth is added on, etc. until reaching one. [Peter Roberts]

Supplication to Guru Rinpoche in Seven Chapters (gsol sdebs le'u bdun ma), the Prayer for the Spontaneous Fulfillment of Aspirations (bsam pa lhun grub ma), and The Sadhana of the Lineage of Awareness-Holders (rig 'dzin gdung sgrub) belong to the cycle of practices focused upon Guru Padmasambhava rediscovered by Rigdzin Gödem (rig 'dzin rgod ldem, 1337-1408) and are part of what is known as the Northern Terma (byang gter). See NS, pp. 780-3. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

support and the supported (rten dang brten pa) [LW1] [RY]

Support for the Accumulations (tshogs rten) Same as the objects of refuge. [RY]

Supported shamatha (rten bcas zhi gnas). See 'shamatha with support.' [RY]

Supporting ceremonies (zhabs brten). [RY]

Supportive rituals (zhabs brten). Rituals performed to remove obstacles for life and health. [ZL] [RY]

Supramundane beings are the triple sangha of shravakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas as well as the vidyadhara sangha such as the Five Eminent Ones (drva ma lnga). [RY]

Supramundane Scripture ('jig rten las 'das pa'i mdo). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras; focused on Vishuddha Mind. Vol. RA in the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme and common accomplishments. See 'siddhis.' [RY]

Supreme and common siddhis (mchog dang thun mong gi dngos grub). Enlightenment and mundane accomplishments. [RY]

supreme and common siddhis, expl. [LW1] [RY]

Supreme attainment of Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi dngos grub). 1) Supreme enlightenment. 2) The third of the four vidyadhara levels. [RY]

Supreme Attribute (chos mchog). The fourth of the four aspects of ascertainment on the path of joining. The highest spiritual attainment within samsaric existence. [RY]

Supreme Dharma of Intent Mindfulness (Skt. Saddharmanusmrityupastana, Tib. dam pa'i chos dran pa nye bar gzhag pa, T 287). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Supreme enlightenment (byang chub mchog), (byang chub snying po). Same as 'buddhahood.' [RY]

Supreme enlightenment(byang chub snying po) (byang chub mchog),. Same as 'buddhahood.' [RY]

Supreme Essence Sutra (snying po mchog gi mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Supreme Hundred Families (dam pa rigs brgya). Name of a sadhana text composed by Guru Rinpoche focused on the hundred peaceful and wrathful deities. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme King Scripture (rje btsan dam pa'i lung). One of the Eighteen Major Scriptures of the Mind Section of Dzogchen. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme Knowledge Tantra (rig pa mchog gi rgyud), Skt. Vidyottama Tantra. A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme Medicinal Nectar of the Garland of Questions and Answers (zhu len sman mchog bdud rtsi phreng ba), was written by Lodrak Drupchen Lekyi Dorje (lho brag grub chen las kyi rdo rje also known as Namkha Gyaltsen nam mkha' rgyal mtshan, 1326-1401). (see GC, vol.3, pp. 282-96). This great Nyingmapa siddha had many visions of Guru Padmasambhava and Vajrapani, whom he used to meet as if meeting real people. He was the Dzogchen master of Tsongkhapa (tsong kha pa, 1357-1419). These Questions and Answers are those that were put by Tsongkhapa to Lodrak Drupchen. The latter would, in turn, ask Vajrapani and then give the answers to Tsongkhapa. On these history and contents of these dialogues, see Ehrhard (1992) and NS, pp. 923ff. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Supreme Mountain (ri mchog). Same as Sumeru. [RY]

Supreme mundane attribute ('jig rten chos mchog). The fourth of the four aspects of ascertainment on the path of joining. The highest spiritual attainment within samsaric existence. [RY]

Supreme mundane quality ('jig rten chos mchog). Same as 'supreme attribute.' [RY]

Supreme nirmanakaya (mchog gi sprul sku). An emanation to appear as a fully enlightened buddha enacting twelve deeds. [RY]

Supreme Objects of Compassion (snying rje'i yul mchog). Refers to all the sentient beings of the six classes, especially the ones in the lower realms. [RY]

Supreme siddhi (mchog gi dngos grub). The state of complete enlightenment. [RY]

Supreme siddhi of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi dngos grub). See supreme siddhi. [RY]

Supreme Steed Display (rta mchog rol pa). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme Steed Display Root Tantra (rta mchog rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. Two versions are found in Vol. HA of Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Supreme vidyadhara (rig 'dzin mchog). See vidyadhara. [RY]

Supreme vidyadhara level of mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po mchog gi rig 'dzin). 1) Supreme enlightenment. 2) The third of the four vidyadhara levels. See 'vidyadhara level of mahamudra.' [ZL] [RY]

Supreme vidyadhara level. [Daki] [RY]

Sur, burnt offering (gsur): an offering of smoke produced by burning tsampa (barley flour) mixed with the "three whites" (milk, butter, and cheese), the "three sweets" (sugar, molasses and honey), and blessed substances. This smoke, accompanied by a meditation upon Avalokitesvara, the Buddha of Compassion, in the form of Khasarpana, and the recitation of his mantra, om mani padme hum, relieves the pangs of hunger and thirst of the pretas (yi dwags), or hungry ghosts. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sur, burnt offering; (gsur) : and offering of smoke produced by burning barley flour, tsampa, mixed with the "three whites" (milk, butter, and cheese), the "three sweets" (sugar, molasses and honey), and blessed substances. This smoke, accompanied with a meditation upon the Buddha of Compassion, Avalokiteshvara in the form of Kasarpani and the recitation of his mantra, Om mani padme hum, relieves from the unending pangs of hunger and thirst of the hungry ghosts, the pretas. [MR]

Surmang Monastery. [RY]

Surmang Tenga Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Susiddhikara (legs par grub pa). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]

Susiddhikara Tantra (legs par grub pa'i rgyud) [LW1] [RY]

Sustainer of Bliss. [Daki] [RY]

Sustainer of Peace (zhi ba 'tsho). [ZL] [RY]

Sustaining freshness (sor zhugs). The Dzogchen version of vipashyana. [RY]

Sustaining the essence (ngo bo skyong ba). An expression used in Mahamudra and Trekcho teachings as a substitute for 'meditation.' [RY]

Sutra - A discourse of the Buddha. The Sutras of the Buddha are classified in accord with the Three Turnings. [RY]

Sutra - discourses given by the Buddha on the Dharma. [RY]

Sutra (mdo (sde)). A Discourse of the buddha, scripture of the Sutra pitaka; also, all exoteric teachings of Buddhism (the three Pitakas and their commentaries) as opposed to the esoteric, Tantric teachings. [RY]

Sutra (mdo), (mdo sde). 1) A discourse by or inspired by the Buddha. 2) A scripture of the Sutra pitaka within the Tripitaka. 3) All exoteric teachings of Buddhism belonging to Hinayana and Mahayana, the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment, as opposed to the esoteric, tantric teachings. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]

SUTRA (mdo), (mdo sde). 1) A discourse by or inspired by the Buddha. 2) A scripture of the Sutra pitaka within the Tripitaka. 3) All exoteric teachings of Buddhism belonging to Hinayana and Mahayana, the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment, as opposed to the esoteric, tantric teachings. [AL] [RY]

Sutra (mdo). Discourse or teaching by the Buddha. Also refers to all the causal teachings that regard the path as the cause of enlightenment. Compare with 'Mantra.' [RY]

Sutra and Mantra (mdo sngags). Sutra refers to the teachings of both Hinayana and Mahayana. Mantra refers to Vajrayana. Sutra means taking the cause as path. Tantra means taking the result as path. [ZL] [RY]

Sutra and Mantra (mdo sngags); Dharma of Statement and Realization; hundred teachers of; one hundred teachers of; unexcelled [LW1] [RY]

Sutra and Mantra; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Sutra and Tantra (mdo rgyud). Sutra refers to the teachings of both Hinayana and Mahayana. Tantra refers to Vajrayana. Sutra means taking the cause as path. Tantra means taking the result as path. [RY]

Sutra and Tantra (mdo rgyud). Synonymous with Sutra and Mantra. [RY]

Sutra and Tantra. See Sutra and Mantra [LW1] [RY]

Sutra Designed as a Jewel Chest: (za ma tog bkod pa'i mdo) Skt. Ratnakaranda sutra; sutra on Avalokitesvara's life). [MR]

Sutra Discriminating between the Path of Virtue and the Path of Vice (Skt. Subhasubhakarmavipaka-nirdesa-sutra, Tib. dge ba dang mi dge ba'i lam gyi rnam par smin pa bstan pa'i mdo, T 355). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra Foretelling Goodness (bzang po lung bstan pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]

Sutra Lamkara (mdo sde rgyan). 'The Ornament of the Sutras,' one of the Five Teachings of Maitreya. [RY]

Sutra Lamkara [LWx] [RY]

Sutra Mahamudra (mdo'i phyag chen). The Mahamudra system based on the prajnaparamita scriptures and emphasizing shamatha and vipashyana and the progressive journey through the five paths and ten bodhisattva bhumis. [RY]

Sutra of Compassion's White Lotus (Skt. mahakaruna-pundarika-sutra, Tib. snying rje chen po padma dkar po'i mdo, T 111-12). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of Entering the City of Vaishali (yangs pa'i grong khyer du 'jug pa) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of Entering the City of Vaishali, (yangs pa'i grong khyer du 'jug pa'i mdo), [RY]

Sutra of Great Liberation (Skt. ghanaja-mahabhricaphulakarma avirnasodhaya bhudharakusumasancaya sutra, Tib. thar pa chen po'i phyogs su rgyas pa'i mdo, T 264). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of Inconceivable Secrets (gsang ba bsam gyis mi khyab pa'i mdo). [ZL] [RY]

Sutra of Individual Liberation (Skt. Pratimoksa-sutra, Tib. so sor thar pa'i mdo, T 2). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of Inexhaustible Intellect; Akshayamatinirdesha-sutra; (blo gros mi zad pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of King-like Concentration; Samadhiraja-sutra; (mdo ting 'dzin gyal po). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of Manjusri's Perfect Emanation (Skt. manjusri-vikridita-sutra, Tib. 'jam dpal rnam par rol pa'i mdo, T 96). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of One Hundred Karmas (mdo sde las brgya pa). [RY]

Sutra of Prajnaparamita in Eight Thousand Verses ( mdo brgyad stong pa) (see The Perfection of Wisdom in 8,000 Lines (RiBa) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of Predictions in Magadha (dbus 'gyur lung bstan gyi mdo). [ZL] [RY]

Sutra of the Arrayed Tree (sdong po bkod pa'i mdo, Gandhavyuha). [EMP] [RY]

Sutra of the Cloud of the Three Jewels; Ratnamegha-sutra; (dkon mchog sprin gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Dense Array (stug po bkod pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Descent to Lanka, Lankavatara Sutra (lang kar gshegs pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Good Aeon (mdo sde bskal bzang); Kangyur 94. [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Heap of Jewels; Ratnakuta-sutra; (dkon mchog brtsegs pa). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Heart of Wisdom (Skt. prajnaparamitahridaya, Tib. mdo shes rab snying po, T 21). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of the King of Samadhi (ting 'dzin rgyal po); expl. of [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the King of Samadhi (ting 'dzin rgyal po'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]

Sutra of the Lion's Roar of Queen Shrimala [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son (yab sras mjal mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son, (Skt. pitaputra-samagamana, Tib. yab dang sras mjal ba'i mdo, T 60), which is part of the Ratnakuta. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of the Meeting of Father and Son, (yab sras mjal mdo), [RY]

Sutra of the Meeting of the Father and Son; Pitaputra-samagamana-sutra; (yab sras mjal ba'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Ornament of the Light of Wisdom; Jñanalokalamkara-sutra; (ye shes snang brgyen gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Power of the Elephant; (glang po'i rtsal gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Sublime Victory Banner (mdo rgyal mtshan dam pa) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra of the Ten Dharmas (Skt. dasadharmaka-sutra, Tib. chos bcu pa'i mdo, T 53). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of the Ten Wheels of Ksitigarbha (sa'i snying po 'khor lo bcu pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]

Sutra of the Vast Display; Lalitavistara-sutra; (rgya cher rol pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Visit to Lanka; Lankavatara-sutra; (lang par gshegs pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the White Lotus of the Holy Dharma; Saddharma-pundarika-sutra; (dam pa'i chos pad dkar po'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra of the Wise and the Foolish (Skt. damomurkha-nama-sutra, Tib. mdza' blun zhes bya ba'i mdo, T 341) is a sutra that contains fifty-one narratives of the previous lives of the Buddha. For a translation into English, see Frye (1981). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Sutra of Unraveling the Intent (dgongs pa nges 'grel). [EMP] [RY]

Sutra on Blossoming in the Direction of the Great Liberation (thar pa chen po'i phyogs tu rgyas pa'i mdo). [RY]

Sutra on Magical Perception. [Daki] [RY]

Sutra on the Application of Mindfulness (dran nyer, mdo dran pa nyer bzhag) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra on the Benefits of Circumambulating Stupas; (mchod rten bskor ba'i phan yon gyi mdo). [PK] [RY]

SUTRA ON THE FURTHERANCE OF VIRTUE (mdo dge rgyas).[AL] [RY]

Sutra on the Inconceivable Secret (gsang ba bsam gyis mi khyab pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra on the Recollection of the Three Jewels (dkon mchog rjes dran gyi mdo). [RY]

Sutra Pitaka (mdo yi sde snod) [LW1] [RY]

SUTRA PITAKA (mdo'i sde snod). See under 'Sutra.'[AL] [RY]

Sutra Pitaka {mdo sde}. One of the three Pitakas, containing concise texts spoken by the Buddha. [RY]

Sutra requested by Crown Jewel; Ratnachudaparipriccha-sutra; (gtsug na rin po ches zhus pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra Requested by Maitreya (byams zhus mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra requested by Maitri Simhanada; (byams pa seng ge'i sgra'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra requested by Sagaramati; Sagaramatiparipriccha-sutra; (blo gros rgya mtshos shus pa'i mdo). [PK] [RY]

Sutra Requested by Sagarmati {blo gros rgya mtshos zhus pa'i mdo}. Name of a sutra. [RY]

Sutra Requested by Tagmo (stag mos zhus mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra Requested by the King of Dharanis (gzungs kyi rgyal zhus pa'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

SUTRA REQUESTED BY UNENDING INTELLIGENCE (blo gros mi zad pas zhus pa'i mdo).[AL] [RY]

Sutra Requested by Wisdom Ocean (ye shes rgya mtsho zhus pa'i mdo). [RY]

Sutra system (mdo lugs) [LW1] [RY]

Sutra system (mdo lugs). Refers in this context to the progressive bodhisattva path. [RY]

Sutra to Inspire Superior Intention (lhag pa'i bsam pa bskul ba'i mdo) [LW1] [RY]

Sutralamkara (mdo sde rgyan). One of the five works of Maitreya. [RY]

Sutralamkara. See Ornament of the Sutras [LW1] [RY]

Sutras (mdo). The discourses and teachings given by Buddha Shakyamuni. [RY]

sutras of definitive meaning [LW1] [RY]

Sutrayana - The vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Sutras [RY]

Sutrayana - The Vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Sutras. [Tarthang]

Suvarnabhumi - Land to the east of India where Ashoka sent missionaries; often associated with Burma [RY]

Svabhavakaya. Or Svabhavavikaya. (ngo bo nyid kyi sku). "The Essence Kaya". This is a term for the inseparability of the other three kayas. [Peter Roberts]

Svabhavikakaya (ngo bo nyid kyi sku). The 'essence body.' Sometimes counted as the fourth kaya, the unity of the first three. [RY]

Svatantrika (rang rgyud pa). Branch of the Madhyamaka, distinguished by use of conventional forms of philosophical reasoning [RY]

Svatantrika Madhyamaka School (dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]

Svatantrika School Asserting Ultimate Illusion (sgyu ma don dam par 'dod pa'i dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]

Svatantrika School of Complete Nondwelling (rab tu mi gnas pa'i dbu ma rang rgyud pa). [RY]

Swayamjnana (rang byung ye shes). "Self-existing" or "self-born wisdom." The name was given by Tulku Urgyen in 1981. Since 1985, 'Rangjung Yeshe' has been used. [RY]

Swift feet (rkang mgyogs). The yogic art of being able to walk extremely fast, covering a huge distance in a short time, through control over the inner currents of energy. [ZL] [RY]

syllables (yi ge); audible syllables of utterance; definition of; divisions of; e and vam; explanation of four types according to Longchen Rabjam; final syllables of fruition; function of; identity of; nadi syllables abiding in the body; nature of; the letter 'a'; ultimate syllables of the natural state [LW1] [RY]

symbol, meaning and sign offerings. Symbol, meaning and sign, is a common division of the aspects of a Tantric deity. They are described towards the end of "General Points that Should be Known", in the longer instruction text "The Oral Instructions of Padmasambhava". Here these three offerings are made to those respective aspects. The offerings and also the praises which follow are found in sequence in the sadhana text. The symbol offering begins "Si-sum tong-ki tor-shong du.." in which all worlds and their beings are offered as a torma. The primordial torma bowl being the three levels of existence: above, upon and below the earth. The meaning offering commences "Tong-sum tong-ki tor-shong du.." in which blazing mount Merus are offered as a torma. The torma-bowl being a thousand billion-world systems, as a Mount Meru is the centre of each world. The sign offering commences "Ban-da bar-way tor-shong du.." in which the flesh, blood, heads and fat of enemies and obstacle-makers is offered as a torma. The torma-bowl being a blazing skull-bowl. [Peter Roberts]

Symbol, meaning, and sign (brda' don rtags gsum). Three aspects of Vajrayana teachings. [RY]

Symbol, meaning, and sign (brda' don rtags gsum). Three aspects of Vajrayana teachings. For example, the peaceful and wrathful deities depicted are the symbol. The meaning they symbolize is the enlightened qualities spontaneously present within the buddha nature. The sign is that they naturally manifest during the bardo of dharmata. [RY]

Symbolic attribute (brda' rtags). For example, a vajra or a wheel. [RY]

Symbolic Being, samaya sattva, (dam tshig sems dpa'). Visualized image of the deity, with which the Tantric practitioner identifies herself. [RY]

Symbolic Graded Path Heap of Jewels (dpe'i lam rim rin chen spungs pa), composed by Geshe Potowa (Po to ba), 1031-1105, a great Kadampa Master. Here dpe'i approximately rendered by "symbolic" means that the teachings presented in it are indications leading to the ultimate truth - not yet the ultimate truth itself as it is expounded in the The Ultimate Graded Path Blue Lapis Vase (don gi lam rim be'u bum sngon po), also composed by Potowa. [MR]

symbolic letters (brda yig). See also sign script, dakini script [LW1] [RY]

symbolic letters; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Symbolic wisdom (dpe'i ye shes). The wisdom which is the unity of bliss and emptiness of the third empowerment and which is used to introduce the 'true wisdom' of the fourth empowerment. [RY]

System of Phakshab, ('phags zhabs kyi bzhes pa), is the tradition of Nagarjuna and his spiritual sons Aryadeva and Chandrakirti. [RY]


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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