Difference between revisions of "Talk:bcom ldan 'das"

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:Erik PK: [[Kunu Rinpoche Tendzin Gyaltsen]], who was an Indian and educated in Sanskrit, once told Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche that [[Bhagavan]] ('''bcom ldan 'das''') has a different connotation and explanation when used in the Buddhist context compared to the Hindu context, where '''[[bcom ldan]]''' would have been a sufficient translation.
 
:Erik PK: [[Kunu Rinpoche Tendzin Gyaltsen]], who was an Indian and educated in Sanskrit, once told Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche that [[Bhagavan]] ('''bcom ldan 'das''') has a different connotation and explanation when used in the Buddhist context compared to the Hindu context, where '''[[bcom ldan]]''' would have been a sufficient translation.
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[[CJD]]: I'm no sanskrit expert, but it seems that the original sanskrit was simpler than the 3 aspects contained in the tibetan translation. According to monier williams, bhagavat means 1) glorious, illustrious, divine, adorable, or venerable; 2) holy (when applied to gods or saints)...there are other definitions, but these two seem the most relevant. With this in mind "Blessed One" doesn't seem to far off the mark.

Latest revision as of 03:57, 16 August 2007

EPK: Could we possibly have some discussion of suitable English translations?

Erik PK: Kunu Rinpoche Tendzin Gyaltsen, who was an Indian and educated in Sanskrit, once told Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche that Bhagavan (bcom ldan 'das) has a different connotation and explanation when used in the Buddhist context compared to the Hindu context, where bcom ldan would have been a sufficient translation.

CJD: I'm no sanskrit expert, but it seems that the original sanskrit was simpler than the 3 aspects contained in the tibetan translation. According to monier williams, bhagavat means 1) glorious, illustrious, divine, adorable, or venerable; 2) holy (when applied to gods or saints)...there are other definitions, but these two seem the most relevant. With this in mind "Blessed One" doesn't seem to far off the mark.