Difference between revisions of "Wu-t'ai shan"

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*Sacred mountain in northern China, especially associated with Manjushri and with practice of Mantrayana.
 
*Sacred mountain in northern China, especially associated with Manjushri and with practice of Mantrayana.
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Mount Wutai (五台山 ''Wǔ-tái-shān'', ‘Five-Peaked Mountain’) in China, a mountain most sacred to the Bodhisattva Mañjuśrī (-kumārabhūta) according to both Chinese and Tibetan tradition. It is located in Shanxi Province (山西省 ''Shān-xī shěng'' in northeastern China. In Tibetan it is known as (''shar phyogs kyi'') [[spang ri rtse lnga]] or more commonly, [[ri bo rtse lnga]], 'the Five-Peaked Mountain (of the eastern direction)'. This is usually identified with Mount Wutai (五台山 ''Wǔ-tái-shān'', ‘Five-Peaked Mountain’) in China, according to both Chinese and Tibetan tradition.
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སངས་རྒྱས་ཕལ་པོ་ཆེའི་མདོ་ལས་ཀྱང་ཤར་ཕྱོགས་ཀྱི་སྤང་རི་རྩེ་ལྔ་ལ་གནས་ཤིང་བྱང་ཆུབ་སེམས་དཔའ་ཁྲི་དང་ལྷན་ཅིག་ཏུ་བཞུགས་པར་འབྱུང་ངོ༌།
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"And in the ''Buddha’s Flower Adornment Scripture'' (''[mahāvaipulya]-buddhāvataṃsaka-sūtra'') too, it is stated that he (Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta) resides on the five-peaked grassy mountain in the eastern direction, and lives there together with ten thousand bodhisattvas."
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[Erick Tsiknopoulos]

Latest revision as of 21:15, 25 June 2020

Wu-t'ai shan (ri bo rtse lnga). Five-Peaked Mountain.

  • mountain with 5 peaks in China
  • Sacred mountain in northern China, especially associated with Manjushri and with practice of Mantrayana.

Mount Wutai (五台山 Wǔ-tái-shān, ‘Five-Peaked Mountain’) in China, a mountain most sacred to the Bodhisattva Mañjuśrī (-kumārabhūta) according to both Chinese and Tibetan tradition. It is located in Shanxi Province (山西省 Shān-xī shěng in northeastern China. In Tibetan it is known as (shar phyogs kyi) spang ri rtse lnga or more commonly, ri bo rtse lnga, 'the Five-Peaked Mountain (of the eastern direction)'. This is usually identified with Mount Wutai (五台山 Wǔ-tái-shān, ‘Five-Peaked Mountain’) in China, according to both Chinese and Tibetan tradition.

སངས་རྒྱས་ཕལ་པོ་ཆེའི་མདོ་ལས་ཀྱང་ཤར་ཕྱོགས་ཀྱི་སྤང་རི་རྩེ་ལྔ་ལ་གནས་ཤིང་བྱང་ཆུབ་སེམས་དཔའ་ཁྲི་དང་ལྷན་ཅིག་ཏུ་བཞུགས་པར་འབྱུང་ངོ༌། "And in the Buddha’s Flower Adornment Scripture ([mahāvaipulya]-buddhāvataṃsaka-sūtra) too, it is stated that he (Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta) resides on the five-peaked grassy mountain in the eastern direction, and lives there together with ten thousand bodhisattvas."

[Erick Tsiknopoulos]