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[[Mahayana]] - ([[theg pa chen po]]) lit. 'Great Vehicle'; the way of those who follow the Bodhisattva ideal, intent on achieving liberation for the purpose of freeing all beings from the misery of samsara. Two paths lead to the realization of the Bodhisattva: the Sutrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras, and the Mantrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras and Tantras. [RY][[
 
[[Mahayana]] - ([[theg pa chen po]]) lit. 'Great Vehicle'; the way of those who follow the Bodhisattva ideal, intent on achieving liberation for the purpose of freeing all beings from the misery of samsara. Two paths lead to the realization of the Bodhisattva: the Sutrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras, and the Mantrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras and Tantras. [RY][[
  
[[Mahayana]] - The Great Vehicle of Realization, followed by all [[Buddha]]s [RY]
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'''[[M continued]]'''
 
 
[[Mahayana]] ([[theg pa chen po]]). The 'Great Vehicle' - the way of a Bodhisattva, and the schools that emphasize it in their teaching. [RY]
 
 
 
[[Mahayana]] ([[theg pa chen po]]). 'Greater vehicle.' When using the term 'greater and lesser vehicles,' Mahayana and Hinayana,' Mahayana includes the tantric vehicles while Hinayana is comprised of the teachings for shravakas and pratyekabuddhas. The connotation of 'greater' or 'lesser' refers to the scope of aspiration, the methods applied and the depth of insight. [Bardo Guide 91][ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana (theg pa chen po). 'Greater vehicle.' When using the term 'greater and lesser vehicles,' Mahayana and Hinayana, Mahayana includes the tantric vehicles while Hinayana is comprised of the teachings for shravakas and pratyekabuddhas. The connotation of 'greater' or 'lesser' refers to the scope of aspiration, the methods applied and the depth of insight. Central to Mahayana practice is the bodhisattva vow to liberate all sentient beings through means and knowledge, compassion and insight into emptiness. Mahayana's two divisions are known as [[Mind-Only]] and Middle Way. The sevenfold greatness of Mahayana mentioned in Maitreya's Ornament of the Sutras are explained by Jamgön Kongtrül in his All-encompassing Knowledge: "The greatness of focus on the immense collection of Mahayana teachings, the greatness of the means of accomplishing the welfare of both self and others, the greatness of wisdom that realizes the twofold egolessness, the greatness of diligent endeavor for three incalculable aeons, the greatness of skillful means such as not abandoning samsaric existence and enacting the seven unvirtuous actions of body and speech without disturbing emotions, the greatness of true accomplishment of the ten strengths, the fourfold fearlessness, and the unique qualities of the awakened ones, and the greatness of activity that is spontaneous and unceasing."[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana (theg pa chen po). The vehicle of bodhisattvas striving for perfect enlightenment for the sake of all beings. For a detailed explanation, see Maitreya's Abhisamayalamkara or Jewel Ornament of Liberation. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana (theg pa chen po). The vehicle of bodhisattvas striving for perfect enlightenment for the sake of liberating all sentient beings. Mahayana has two aspects: Sutra emphasizing the extensive teachings and Mantra emphasizing the profound. For a detailed explanation of Sutrayana, see Maitreya's Abhisamayalamkara or Gampopa's Jewel Ornament of Liberation. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana (theg pa chen po); difference from Hinayana; listing the sevenfold greatness; the result; two divisions of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana {theg pa chen po}. Greater Vehicle.  The Mahayana practitioner is motivated by the altruistic intention to liberate others from suffering and lead them to Buddhahood. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana sutras (theg pa chen po'i mdo). [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana teachings (theg pa chen po'i chos). The Buddha's teachings comprised of the second and third turning of the wheel of Dharma as well as the commentaries upon them by the great scholars of India and Tibet. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayana vow See bodhisattva. [Rain of Wisdom]
 
 
 
Mahayana; difference from Hinayana; listing the sevenfold greatness; the result; two divisions of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayanasutralankara; of Asanga; Ed. and translation by J.W. De Jong, Paris, 19 (Buddhica, Premiere Serie: Memoires, t. IX). [MR]
 
 
 
Mahayoga - Second of the three inner Tantras of the rNying ma tradition [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga - Second of the three inner Tantras of the rNying-ma tradition. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor) means great yoga [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor); approach and accomplishment; as Father Tantra; details of; Eight Sadhana Teachings; meaning of; meaning of Wisdom Essence; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor); approach and accomplishment; Father Tantra; listing of Eight Sadhana Teachings; literal meaning; meaning of Wisdom Essence [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'three inner tantras.' It empasizes the development stage. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'Three Inner Tantras.' Mahayoga as scripture is divided into two parts: Tantra Section and Sadhana Section. The Tantra Section consists of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras while the Sadhana Section is comprised of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Jamgön Kongtrül says in his Treasury of Knowledge: "Mahayoga emphasizes means (upaya), the development stage, and the view that liberation is attained through growing accustomed to the insight into the nature of the indivisibility of the superior two truths." The superior two truths in Mahayoga are purity and equality: The pure natures of the aggregates, elements and sense factors are the male and female buddhas and bodhisattvas. At the same time, everything that appears and exists is of the equal nature of emptiness. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the 'Three Inner Tantras.' Mahayoga as scripture is divided into two parts: Tantra Section and Sadhana Section. The Tantra Section consists of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras while the Sadhana Section is comprised of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Jamgön Kongtrül says in his Treasury of Knowledge: "Mahayoga emphasizes means (upaya), the development stage, and the view that liberation is attained through growing accustomed to the insight into the nature of the indivisibility of the superior two truths." The superior two truths in Mahayoga are purity and equality — the pure natures of the aggregates, elements and sense factors are the male and female buddhas and bodhisattvas. At the same time, everything that appears and exists is of the equal nature of emptiness.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mahayoga of the Mahayoga" and so on. They are the Mahayoga of the Mahayoga. The Anuyoga of the Mahayoga. The Atiyoga of the Mahayoga. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mahayoga; expl. [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Maheshvara (dbang phyug chen po). One of the chief Hindu divinities. [RY]
 
 
 
Mahinda - In the Theravadin tradition, the son of Ashoka and leader of the mission that established the Dharma in Sri Lanka [RY]
 
 
 
Mahinda - In the Theravadin tradition, the son of Asoka and leader of the mission that established the Dharma in Sri Lanka. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Mahoraga (lto 'phye chen po). 'Great serpent', a class of demons. [RY]
 
mahoraga [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Main part of practice (nyams len gyi dngos gzhi). Refers to the practice that follows the preliminaries: either yidam practice or, here, the actual practice of Mahamudra or Dzogchen. According to Jigmey Lingpa, 'main part' literally means 'actual basis' in the sense that 'basis' means to have full intellectual comprehension of the practice and 'actual' means to have direct experience of its meaning. [RY]
 
 
 
main temple of Samye, the three stories of which were each built in a different style--Indian, Tibetan, and Khotanese (li yul). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
 
 
[[Maitreya]] - The coming [[Buddha]], now a [[Bodhisattva]] in [[Tushita]] heaven; author of the five treatises preserved by [[Asanga]]. Sometimes known as - Maitreyanatha [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya (byams pa) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya (byams pa), the Loving One. The bodhisattva regent of Buddha Shakyamuni, presently residing in the Tushita heaven until becoming the fifth buddha of this kalpa. [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya (byams pa). 'The Friendly', n. of a Bodhisattva now residing in Tushita, who is to appear on Earth as the next Universal Buddha. [RY]
 
 
 
[[Maitreya]] ([[byams pa]]). 'The Loving One.' The [[bodhisattva]] regent of [[Buddha Shakyamuni]], presently residing in the Tushita heaven until becoming the fifth buddha of this [[aeon]]; author of five treatises preserved by [[Asanga]]. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya {byams pa}. A Bodhisattva who is supposed to be the next Buddha of this aeon. [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya Temple (byams pa gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Maitreya; quotation by; quote by; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Maitripa (mai tri pa). A great Indian master and one of the teachers of Marpa the Translator. [RY]
 
 
 
Maitripa: (1012-1097) [MR]
 
 
 
[[Majestic Blazing Retreat Tantra]] ([[gzi ldan 'bar ba mtshams kyi rgyud]]). One of the [[Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras]]. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Major and minor circles of Tögal (thod rgal gyi thig le thig phran). The details of this should be received through the oral instructions of one's teacher. [RY]
 
 
 
Major and Minor Gathering Tantra (tshogs rgyud che chung). A Mahayoga scripture explaining the ritual of a ganachakra. See also 'feast offering.' [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Major and minor marks (mtshan dpe). The thirty-two major and eighty minor marks of excellence that characterize the perfect physical form of a nirmanakaya or sambhogakaya buddha. A universal ruler is also said to possess a resemblance of these marks. [RY]
 
 
 
Major and Minor Nectar Display (bdud rtsi rol pa che chung). One of the Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Major and Minor Torma Tantra (gtor lung che chung gi rgyud). A Mahayoga scripture. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Major lie - A lie that can cause a fully-ordained monk to lose his vows is pretending to be a realized person when he is not; also claiming falsely to have had visions of deities, to have miraculous powers, etc.. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Malaya; Peak of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maldro (mal gro). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Male classes (pho rgyud). One of the three classes of Dharma protectors. [RY]
 
 
 
Maledictory Fierce Mantra (dmod pa drag sngags); transmission of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maledictory Fierce Mantra (rmod pa drag sngags). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Maledictory Fierce Mantra, Möpa, (dmod pa); transmission of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mamaki. Second of the four Sublime Mothers. [RY]
 
 
 
Mamo (ma mo). 1) See under Mundane Mother Deities. 2) A class of semi-divine beings who sometimes act as protectors of the Dharma. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
MAMO (ma mo). Abbreviation of 'Mundane Mother Deities' ('jig rten ma mo). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Female divinities manifested out of dharmadhatu but appearing in ways that correspond to mundane appearances through the interrelationship between the mundane world and the channels, winds, and essences within our body. They have both an ultimate and relative aspect. The chief figure in this mandala is Chemchok Heruka, the wrathful form of Buddha Samantabhadra in the form known as Ngöndzok Gyalpo, the King of True Perfection. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mamo Bötong [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mamo Chidu. [RY]
 
 
 
Manarasovar - Southern Gate of the Thaw (khrus sgo lho) is thus called because this is the last area of the lake to become frozen and is the first to thaw. It normally freezes at the beginning of the twelfth Tibetan month and thaws at the beginning of the third month. The Gelukpa monastery built on that shore took this name (khrus sgo dgon pa). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Manarasowar Sutra (ma dros pa'i mdo). [EMP] [RY]
 
 
 
Manasarovar - monasteries - There were eight monasteries around Manasarovar, five of which have been rebuilt since 1981: 1) ser ra lung, "Hailstorm Valley," to the east, founded by the great yogin Drigung Dordzin Konchok Gyudzin ('bri gung rdor 'dzin dkon mchog rgyud 'dzin);  2) mnyes 'go, "Started with Pleasure," in the southeast, so called because Atisha was overjoyed when he visited the place, remaining there for a few days. Later Ngorchen Kunga Lhundrup (ngor chen kun dga' lhun grub) had a vision of Guru Padmasambhava there and built a monastery that was subsequently held by the Sakya school;  3) khrus sgo, the "Gate of the Thaw," in the south. See above, note 5;  4) 'go tshugs, "The Initiator," in the southwest, so called because it was there that, after meditating for three months in a cave, Gyalwa Götsangpa began the propagation at Kailash of the Drukpa Kagyu tradition ('brug pa bka' rgyud);  5) byi'u, "Little Bird," in the west, built in the form of the Glorious Copper-colored Mountain (zangs mdog dpal ri) upon a heart-shaped rock. It was blessed by Guru Padmasambhava, who is said to have spent seven days there on his way to Chamara, when leaving Tibet; 6) gser gyi bya skyib, "Golden Bird-shelter," in the north-west, a place said to have been first blessed by the Buddha and his five hundred arhats, afterwards by Drigung Chen-nga Lingpa ('bri gung spyan snga gling pa) and his five hundred great meditators, then by Tsang Nyön Heruka (gtsang smyon he ru ka, 1452-1507) who established a retreat center there; 7) glang sna, "Elephant Trunk," in the north, so called because it was built on a hill shaped like an elephant's trunk. It was founded by two Drigung masters, Drupthob Nyemowa Samten Phuntsok (grub thob snye mo ba bsam gtan phun tshogs) and his reincarnation Kunga Lodrö Nyingpo (kun dga' blo gros snying po); 8) bon ri, "Bön Mountain", in the north-east, a seat of the Gelukpa school. It was founded by the great meditator Khedrup Lobzang Norbu (mkhas grub blo bzang nor bu) on Bönri, the hill which Milarepa had given to Naro Bönchung as a dwelling place after winning the ownership of Mt Kailash in a contest of miracles. See MK, pp. 73-76. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
[[Mandala]] ([[dkyil 'khor]]) lit. 'concentric circle'; a mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [RY]
 
 
 
[[mandala]] ([[dkyil 'khor]]), literal meaning of; special meaning of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
[[Mandala]] ([[dkyil 'khor]]). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a [[deity]] along with its surrounding environment. A mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) A mandala offering is an offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala (dkyil 'khor). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a deity along with its surrounding environment. A mandala is a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) A mandala offering is an offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of offerings in tantric ritual. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala (dkyil 'khor). 1) 'Center and surrounding.' Usually a symbolic, graphic representation of a tantric deity's realm of existence. 2) An offering visualized as the entire universe, as well as the arrangement of the shrine in a tantric ritual. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala (dkyil 'khor). Literally means 'center and surrounding,' but should be understood according to context. Usually a deity along with its surrounding environment. [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala (dkyil 'khor, 'khor lo, mandal). 'Circle, disk,'esp. the 'circle' composed of a deity and her or his emanations, attendants and environment; also the disk of an entire universe visualized as an offering, and the round plate or tray that serves as physical support for this practice. [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala {dkyil 'khor}. The universe visualized as an offering. During the genration phase it refers to the place where the deities reside, such a the Buddha palace and its surroundings. [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo). A gathering of deities as one mandala. [RY]
 
mandala. Here mandala refers to the rimmed metal disc used for offerings, not to the diagrammatic representation of a deity's palace, which is the more well known use of the word. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
mandala; literal meaning of; special meaning of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
mandala-chakra. Mandala-chakra, which is described in Tsewang Norbu's commentary as meaning the [[Ati Yoga]]. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo) means the lower gate of another's body, the phonya path of great bliss. [RY]
 
 
 
mandala-circle (dkyil 'khor gyi 'khor lo); expl. [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandara, mandarava. The coral tree, Erythrina indica, one of the five trees of paradise, with brilliant scarlet flowers. [RY]
 
 
 
Mandarava (man da ra ba me tog). Princess of Zahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. One of his five main consorts. Her name refers to the coral tree, Erythrina Indica, one of the five trees of paradise, which has brilliant scarlet flowers. She is said to be identical with the dakini Niguma and the yogini by the name Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli, Jamgön Kongtrül says, "Born as the daughter of Vihardhara, the king of Zahor, and Queen Mohauki accompanied by miraculous signs, (and because of her great beauty), many kings from India and China vied to take her as their bride. Nevertheless, she had an unshakable renunciation and entered the gate of the Dharma. Padmasambhava perceived that she was to be his disciple and accepted her as his spiritual consort, but the king, fearing that his bloodline would be contaminated, had the master burned alive. When Padmasambhava showed the miracle of transforming the mass of fire into a lake, the king gained faith and without hesitation offered his entire kingdom and the princess. When the king requested teachings, Padmasambhava showered upon twenty-one disciples the great rain of the Dharma by transmitting the tantras, scriptures and oral instructions of Kadü Chökyi Gyamtso, the Dharma Ocean Embodying All Teachings. Thus, the master established the king and his ministers on the vidyadhara levels. Guru Rinpoche accepted her as his consort and in Maratika, the Cave of Bringing Death to and End, both master and consort displayed the manner of achieving the unified vajra body on the vidyadhara level of life mastery. Mandarava remained in India and has directly and indirectly brought a tremendous benefit to beings. In Tibet, she appeared miraculously at the great Dharma Wheel of Tramdruk where she exchanged symbolic praises and replies with Guru Rinpoche. The details of this are recorded extensively in the Padma Kathang. An independent life story of Mandarava is found in the collected writings of Orgyen Lingpa. Mandarava was a wisdom dakini among whose different names and manifestations are counted the yogini Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments, (Mirükyi Gyenchen), at the time of Lord Marpa, Risülkyi Naljorma at the time of Nyen Lotsawa, and Drubpey Gyalmo at the time of Rechungpa. Mandarava is also accepted as being Chushingi Nyemachen, the consort of Maitripa, as well as the dakini Niguma. Her compassionate emanations and her blessings are beyond any doubt and since she attained the indestructible rainbow body she is surely present (in the world) right now." [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandarava [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandarava Flower 1. (man da ra ba me tog). Princess of Zahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. One of his five main consorts. Her name refers to the coral tree, Erythrina Indica, one of the five trees of paradise, which has brilliant scarlet flowers. She is said to be identical with the dakini Niguma and the yogini by the name Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments. In The Precious Garland of Lapis Lazuli (p. 352), Jamgön Kongtrül says, "Born as the daughter of Vihardhara, the king of Zahor, and Queen Mohauki accompanied by miraculous signs, (and because of her great beauty), many kings from India and China vied to take her as their bride. Nevertheless, she had an unshakable renunciation and entered the gate of the Dharma. Padmasambhava perceived that she was to be his disciple and accepted her as his spiritual consort, but the king, fearing that his bloodline would be contaminated, had the master burned alive. When Padmasambhava showed the miracle of transforming the mass of fire into a lake, the king gained faith and without hesitation offered his entire kingdom and the princess. When the king requested teachings, Padmasambhava showered upon twenty-one disciples the great rain of the Dharma by transmitting the tantras, scriptures and oral instructions of Kadü Chökyi Gyamtso, the Dharma Ocean Embodying All Teachings. Thus the master established the king and his ministers on the vidyadhara levels. Guru Rinpoche accepted her as his consort and in Maratika, the Cave of Bringing Death to and End, both master and consort displayed the manner of achieving the unified vajra body on the vidyadhara level of life mastery. Mandarava remained in India and has directly and indirectly brought a tremendous benefit to beings. In Tibet, she appeared miraculously at the great Dharma Wheel of Tramdruk where she exchanged symbolic praises and replies with Guru Rinpoche. The details of that are recorded extensively in the Padma Kathang. An independent life story of Mandarava is found in the collected writings of Orgyen Lingpa. Mandarava was a wisdom dakini among whose different names and manifestations are counted the yogini Adorned with Human Bone Ornaments, (Mirükyi Gyenchen), at the time of Lord Marpa, Risülkyi Naljorma at the time of Nyen Lotsawa, and Drubpey Gyalmo at the time of Rechungpa. Mandarava is also accepted as being Chushingi Nyemachen, the consort of Maitripa, as well as the dakini Niguma. Her compassionate emanations and her blessings are beyond any doubt and since she attained the indestructible rainbow body she is surely present (in the world) right now." [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mandarava. Princess of Sahor and close disciple of Guru Rinpoche. [RY]
 
[[Mangalam]] ([[bkra shis shog]]). "May all be auspicious." [RY]
 
 
 
Mangje Selnang of Bey (sbas mang rje gsal snang). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mang-yul (mang yul). The area north of the Kathmandu valley, between Trisuli and the present border to Tibet. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mang-yul between Nepal and Tibet. [Daki] [RY]
 
 
 
Mani chanting - Traditionally, once a year, the whole population of a village and its surroundings would gather and recite together a hundred million mani mantras. i.e. the mantra of Avalokitesvara, om mani padme hum. During this time, a lama would give daily teachings on the Dharma. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mani mantras. [RY]
 
 
 
Manibhadra (nor bzang). A great bodhisattva of a past aeon. [RY]
 
 
 
Manifest Dharmata (chos nyid mngon sum). The first of the four visions in Dzogchen practice. [RY]
 
 
 
Manifold capacity (thugs rje sna tshogs). The capacity for manifesting manifold phenomena and perceptions. See 'eesence, nature, and capacity.' [RY]
 
Manika. [RY]
 
 
 
Ma-ning (ma ning) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manis {ma ni}. Om Mani Padma Hum Hri. The mantra of Avalokiteshvara {spyan ras gzigs}, the deity of compassion, the most popular deity of Tibet. Though Avalokiteshvara is mentioned as one of the three main Bodhisattvas, according to Vajrayana he is a fully enlightened Buddha. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjughosa ('jam dbyangs). 'The Sweet-voiced', a form of Manjushiri. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjughosa (soft or sweet voiced) A common epithet of Manjushri. [Rain of Wisdom]
 
 
 
Manjugosha. Same as Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjugosha. See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjugosha; alias Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri ('Jam dbyangs) Bodhisattva of Wisdom. Manjushri manifested in Tibet as King Khri srong 'de'u bstan in order to help the Tibetans firmly establish the Dharma. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs). One of the eight main bodhisattvas. He is the personification of the perfection of transcendent knowledge. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri ('jam dpal dbyangs). One of the eight main bodhisattvas. He is the personification of the perfection of transcendent knowledge. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri ('jam dpal). n. of a Bodhisattva, who represents particularly Wisdom and is depicted flourishing a blazing wisdom sword in the right hand and holding a lotus that supports a book in the left. He is called 'the Youthful' (kumara (-bhuta), gzhon nu(rgyur pa) because of his everlastingly youthful appearance; the same title is sometimes taken to mean 'Crown Prince'. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri (Yamantaka); transmission of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri {'jam dpal dbyangs}. A tenth level Bodhisattva who embodies the knowledge and wisdom of all the Buddhas. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Body ('jam dpal sku) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Body ('jam dpal sku). The heruka of the Tathagata Body family or the tantric teachings connected to this deity among the 'Eight Sadhana Teachings.' Also known as Yamantaka, the wrathful form of Manjushri. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Heruka ('jam dpal khrag 'thung). Same as Yamantaka. One of the Eight Heruka Sadhanas. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Kumara ('jam dpal gzhon nu). The peaceful aspect of Manjushri. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Namasangirti Tantra Expressed in Songs of Praise ('jam dpal gyi mtshan yang dag par brjod pa bstod pa glur blangs pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga known to all Tibetan Buddhists as Jampal Tsenjö. Translated as Chanting the Names of Manjushri, A. Wayman, Shambhala Publications. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Root Tantra. The Arya Manjushri Mula Tantra ('phags pa 'jam dpal gyi rtsa ba'i rgyud). This is text 543 in the Derge Kangyur and has 36 chapters. It begins on page 105 of volume Na and takes up the rest of the volume. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Manjushri Tantra of Immaculate Wisdom Being ('jam dpal ye shes sems dpa' dri ma med pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Tantra of Sharp Intelligence ('jam dpal shes rab rnon po'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Temple ('jam dpal gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Web-cutting Tantra ('jam dpal drva ba gcod pa'i rgyud). A tantra belonging to Kriya Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Yamantaka ('jam dpal gshin rje bshed). The wrathful aspect of Manjushri. One of the eight Heruka Sadhanas. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri Yamantaka; transmission of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushri; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen). An Indian master of the Dzogchen lineage and disciple of Garab Dorje. Same as Jampal Shenyen. [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushrimitra ('jam dpal bshes gnyen); mention of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Manjushrimitra 1. ('jam dpal bshes gnyen, pron. Jampal Shenyen). An Indian master in the Dzogchen lineage and the chief disciple of Garab Dorje. In his role as a master in the lineage of the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga, he received the transmission of Yamantaka in the form of the Secret Wrathful Manjushri Tantra and other texts. Manjushrimitra was born in the Magadha district of India and was soon an adept in the general sciences and the conventional topics of Buddhism. After having become the most eminent among five hundred panditas, he received many teachings and empowerments from Garab Dorje, Lalitavajra, and other masters and reached the unified level of enlightenment, indivisible from Manjushri. Yamantaka appeared to him in person, conferred empowerment and transmitted the tantras and oral instructions. Among his chief recipients of this teaching were Hungkara, Padmasambhava, and Hanatela. There seem to have been several masters with this name, but Guru Tashi Tobgyal in his Ocean of Wondrous Sayings to Delight the Learned Ones views them as being magical emanations of the same master. See also Sadhana Section. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mansion of Complete Victory (rnam par rgyal ba'i khang bzang) is the name of the palace of the celestial beings of the thirty-threefold god-realm. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mansion of Secret Mantra (gsang sngags pho brang) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra - syllables and words whose sounds can communicate the nature of tantric deities, grant super normal powers, or lead to purification and realization. [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra  The secret mantras (gsang sngags), the vidya mantras (rigs sngags), and the dharani mantras (gzungs sngags) have many different connotations such as secret mantras being Father Tantra, vidya mantras being Mother Tantra, and dharani mantras being Nondual Tantra. Here all the root mantras, essence and quintessence mantras taught in the Father, Mother and Nondual Tantras are secret mantras. The six-syllable mantra, the GATE mantra (om ga gate paragate etc)  are vidya mantras. The Vajra Vidarana, Vajra Subduer, [rnam 'joms] mantra and so forth are dharani mantras. [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra (mantra (rig) sngags; vidya, rig pa; guhya mantra, gsang sngags). Because mantras play such a key role in its practice, Tantra or Vajrayana is often called Mantra, or the M. Vehicle. Their nature is discussed in many books, such as Lama Govinda's. [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra (sngags). 1) A synonym for Vajrayana. 2) A particular combination of sounds symbolizing and communicating the nature of a deity and which lead to purification and realization, for example Om mani padme hung. There are chiefly three types of mantra: guhya mantra, vidya mantra and dharani mantra. [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra (sngags). 1) A synonym for Vajrayana. 2) A particular combination of sounds symbolizing the nature of a deity, for example Om mani padme hung. [RY]
 
 
 
MANTRA (sngags). 1) A synonym for Vajrayana. 2) A particular combination of sounds symbolizing and communicating the nature of a deity and which lead to purification and realization, for example OM MANI PADME HUNG. There are chiefly three types of mantra: guhya mantra, vidya mantra and dharani mantra. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra and Philosophy (sngags dang mtshan nyid). Mantra is synonymous with Secret Mantra or Vajrayana while Philosophy refers to the 'causal vehicles of philosophy:' Hinayana and Mahayana. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
[[Mantra and Philosophy]] - 'Mantra' means Vajrayana while the 'Vehicle of Philosophy' includes both [[Hinayana]] and [[Mahayana]]. [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra Mahamudra (sngags kyi phyag chen). The Mahamudra practice connected to the Six Doctrines of Naropa. [RY]
 
 
 
MANTRA, VEHICLE OF (sngags; sngags kyi theg pa). Same as Mantrayana. See under Vajrayana.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantra. See Mantrayana, Sutra and Mantra [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantradhara (sngags 'chang). An adept of tantric rituals. [ZL] [RY]
 
mantras (sngags); three types [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
mantras of multiplication. Mantras of multiplication increase the effect of subsequent mantras that are recited, so that for example, one mantra will become equivalent to a hundred thousand. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
mantras; explanation of three types; three types of; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrayana - see Vajrayana. [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrayana - The vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Tantras and proceeds from the point of view of the goal [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrayana - The Vehicle of Realization which depends on the teachings of the Tantras and proceeds from the point of view of the goal. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Mantrayana (sngags kyi theg pa). Syn. for Secret Mantra or Vajrayana. [RY]
 
 
 
MANTRAYANA (sngags kyi theg pa). Syn. for Secret Mantra or Vajrayana.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrayana (sngags kyi theg pa); comparison with the Sutra system; eleven special qualities; explanation of cognitive obscuration; five special qualities of; meaning of Wisdom Essence; outer and inner sections; scriptures for the stages of the path; listing of seven special qualities of; special version of the Three Jewels; superiority of; tradition of bodhichitta vow [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantric (sngags kyi). Of or pertaining to Vajrayana. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
mantrika (sngags pa) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrika (sngags pa). A practitioner of Vajrayana. [RY]
 
 
 
MANTRIKA (sngags pa). A practitioner of Vajrayana.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrika (sngags pa). A practitioner of Vajrayana.[Primer] [RY]
 
 
 
Mantrika (sngags pa). See tantrika. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Many Birds (bya mang po) is a place near the Divine Lake of the Raksas (lha mtsho srin mtsho) in Gungthang. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mara - lord of the desire realm, master of illusion who attempted to prevent the Buddha from attaining enlightenment at Bodh Gaya. [RY]
 
 
 
Mara - The lord of illusion, ruler of the desire realm, whom the Buddha defeated before attaining enlightenment [RY]
 
 
 
Mara - The lord of illusion, ruler of the desire realm, whom the Buddha defeated before attaining enlightenment. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud), of the Realm of Desire [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud), the devil, the personification of ego. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud). Demon or demonic influence that creates obstacles for practice and enlightenment. Mythologically said be a powerful god who dwells in the highest abode in the Realm of Desire; the master of illusion who attempted to prevent the Buddha from attaining enlightenment at Bodhgaya. For the Dharma practitioner, Mara symbolizes one's own ego-clinging and preoccupation with the eight worldly concerns. Generally, there are four maras or obstructions to practice of the Dharma: those of defilements, death and the aggregates, and the godly mara of seduction. Sometimes the four maras are mentioned by name; Lord of Death, Godly Son, Klesha and Skandha. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud). Demon or demonic influence that creates obstacles for practice and enlightenment. Mythologically said to dwell in the highest abode in the realm of desire master of illusion who attempted to prevent the Buddha from attaining enlightenment at Bodh Gaya. For the Dharma practitioner, Mara symbolizes one's own ego-clinging and preoccupation with the eight worldly concerns. [RY]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud). Demon or demonic influence that creates obstacles for practice and enlightenment. Mythologically said be a powerful god who dwells in the highest abode in the Realm of Desire; the master of illusion who attempted to prevent the Buddha from attaining enlightenment at Bodhgaya. For the Dharma practitioner, Mara symbolizes one's own ego-clinging and preoccupation with the eight worldly concerns. Generally, there are four maras or obstructions to practice of the Dharma: those of defilements, death and the aggregates, and the godly mara of seduction. Sometimes the four maras are mentioned by name; Lord of Death, Godly Son, Klesha and Skandha. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mara (bdud). Lit. 'death'. 1. The Evil One, a powerful god ruling the highest heaven of the Desire Realm, who habitually tries to distract and hinder Buddhas and bodhisattvas. since each world-system has its own set of heavens, it is possible to speak of infinitely many such Evil Ones. 2. The four maras or obstructions to practice of the Dharma: those of defilements, death and the aggregates, and the god mara. 3. Mara's whole army of followers are also called Maras or maras after him; they act as evil spirits, obstructing Dharma practice. [RY]
 
 
 
mara [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mara of meritorious action (bsod nams kyi las kyi bdud). The seduction to aim one's spiritual practice towards selfish ends. Virtuous deeds that are not embraced by renunciation or bodhicitta. [RY]
 
 
 
Mara's Subjugation Cave : the principal among the four main caves of Lachi (bdud 'dul phug, ze phug, lung bstan tshal chen phug, and sbas phug), where Jetsün Milarepa subjugated all evil forces. It is also the cave where Jetsün Milarepa spent 6 months in complete seclusion, blocked by snows which had fallen form 18 days and nights, and where Jetsün Milarepa transformed his body into water and vice-versa. Later other greats saint meditated in this cave: Rechungpa, Nyö Lhanangpa (mnyos lha nang pa, ko brag pa, g.yag ru dpal grags, la phyi pa nam mka' rgyal mthan, tsang myongs, sharkha ras chen). One finds around several footprints of Mirarepa. [MR]
 
 
 
Mara-Taming Mantra Temple (bdud 'dul sngags pa gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Maratika ('chi ba mthar byed). The sacred place in eastern Nepal where Guru Rinpoche and Mandarava were blessed with immortal life by Buddha Amitayus. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Maratika Cave [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maratika. The sacred place in eastern Nepal where Guru Rinpoche was bless with immortal life by Buddha Amitayus. [RY]
 
 
 
Mardza Ridge [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Margyenma; see Queen Margyenma; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Markham Ridge [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Marks and Signs (laksananuvyanjana, mtshan (dang) dpe (byad)). The thirty-two characteristic Marks and eighty minor signs of a Great Being (a Universal Monarch or a Buddha), such as thousand-spoked wheels on the palms and soles, the hairs of the body pointing upwards, and copper-colored nails. [RY]
 
 
 
Marks and signs (mtshan dpe). A perfect buddha's 32 major and 80 minor marks of excellence. [RY]
 
 
 
Marpa (mar pa). The great forefather of the Kagyü lineage. See Life of Marpa the Translator, Shambhala Publications. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
Marpa (mar pa). The great Tibetan master and disciple of Naropa who brought the teachings of Mahamudra and the Six Doctrines to Tibet. See the book "Life of Marpa the translator." [RY]
 
 
 
Marpa Lotsawa / Mar pa lo tsa ba - Tibetan disciple of Naropa and master of Mi la ras pa; founder of the bKa' brgyud school [RY]
 
 
 
Marpa Lotsawa; Chökyi Lodrö 1012-1097. (mar pa lo tsa ba chos kyi blo gros) Born in Khodrak, in southern Tibet, he first studied with Drogmi Lotsawa then travelled to India three times to meet his root teacher the mahasiddha pandit Naropa, as well as his other gurus, Jnanagharba, Kukkuripa and Maitripa. [MR]
 
 
 
Marpa the Translator (mar pa lo tsa ba). The great forefather of the Kagyu lineage. See 'Life of Marpa the Translator,' Shambhala Publications. [RY]
 
 
 
Marpa: 1012-1097 [MR]
 
 
 
Marut (rlung lha). Perhaps 'flashing or shining one'. Brahmanical god of the wind, and the numerous Vedic storm-gods. [RY]
 
 
 
Marvelous Emanated Scriptures (ngo mtshar sprul pa'i glegs bam), see Appendix 5. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Marvels (rmad du byung ba); aspect of excellent speech [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
MASTER (bla ma). In the Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo, Padmasambhava says: "The vajra master, the root of the path, is someone who has the pure conduct of samaya and vows. He is fully adorned with learning, has discerned it through reflection, and through meditation he possesses the qualities and signs of experience and realization. With his compassionate action he accepts disciples." In short, someone with the correct view and genuine compassion. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Master (bla ma, slob dpon). Title given to spiritual teachers and learned scholars. In this book, master often refers to Guru Rinpoche. [RY]
 
 
 
master (slob dpon, bla ma); characteristics of; expl. qualities; how to follow [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Master Bodhisattva (slob dpon bo dhi sa tva). See 'Shantarakshita.' [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Master of ceremonies. [RY]
 
 
 
MASTER OF UDDIYANA (o rgyan gyi slob dpon). Another name for Padmasambhava.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Master of Uddiyana. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]
 
Master Padmakara; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Master, acarya, (slob dpon). title given to spiritual teachers and learned scholars. [RY]
 
 
 
master; characteristics of; expl. qualities; how to follow [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
masteries; eight; eight (zil gnon brgyad), expl.; ten (dbang bcu); ten (dbang bcu), expl. [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Matchless King of the Shakyas, Buddha Shakyamuni 84 [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Matchless King of the Shakyas. See Buddha Shakyamuni [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Matchless King of the Shakyas; alias Buddha Shakyamuni; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
material finality [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
material finality [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Material substance (bem po) are the earth, stones, mountains and rocks etc. [RY]
 
 
 
Mathura - An early Buddhist center; later the location of an important school of art [RY]
 
 
 
Mathura - An early Buddhist center; later the location of an important school of art. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Matrceta - A convert to Buddhism after being defeated in debate by Aryadeva; author of many famous stotras and other works [RY]
 
 
 
Matrceta - A convert to Buddhism after being defeated in debate by Aryadeva; author of many famous stotras and other works. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Matrul Thegchog Jigme Pawo 5th : 1856-1915 [MR]
 
 
 
maturation; qualities of (rnam smin yon tan); [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
maturation; qualities of maturation (rnam smin yon tan) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maturing instructions {smin khrid}. Maturing instructions are given while one actually does the practice. If they are given over a period of time one does the practice after the instructions are given and relates one's experience to one's master from time to time. Upon that the master gives the subsequent instructions. [RY]
 
 
 
Maudgalyayana - One of the Buddha's two chief disciples, said to excel in attainments [RY]
 
 
 
Mauryan Empire - First great historical Indian empire, founded late in the fourth century B.C. [RY]
 
 
 
Mawey Senge (smra ba'i seng ge). Lion of Speech. One of the 12 manifestations. He is Guru Rinpoche inseparable from Manjushri. [RY]
 
 
 
Maya - The mother of Sakyamuni Buddha. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Maya - The mother of Shakyamuni Buddha [RY]
 
 
 
Maya (sgyu ma). Magical illusion.[Primer] [RY]
 
 
 
Maya (sgyu 'phrul). See also Magical Net [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maya Jala. [Daki] [RY]
 
 
 
Maya Sections, Eight (sgyu 'phrul sde brgyad) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maya Tantra (sgyu 'phrul) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Maya Tantra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mayajala (sgyu 'phrul drva ba) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mayajala Tantras (sgyu 'phrul gyi rgyud) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mayajala Tantras (sgyu 'phrul gyi rgyud) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Meadow of Mönkha (mon kha ne'u ring). Possibly identical with Mönkha Senge Dzong, a cave situated to the east of Bumthang in Bhutan which was used by Padmasambhava and later by Yeshe Tsogyal as a sacred place for the sadhana of Vajra Kilaya. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meaning (don). See 'symbol, meaning, and sign.' [RY]
 
 
 
Meaningful Lasso Tantra (don yod zhags pa'i rgyud). A tantra focused on Avalokiteshvara; belongs to Kriya Yoga and is also known as Amogha Pasha. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meaningful to Behold (mthong ba don ldan) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Meaningful to Behold (mthong ba don ldan) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Means (thabs; Skt. upaya). The methods or skillful means that are the practical application of the Buddhist teachings. Can also refer to the seventh of the ten paramitas. [RY]
 
 
 
Means , Method (upaya, thabs). The conventional aspect of the practice of Dharma, equivalent to Compassion, as contrasted with the ultimate aspect, wisdom. In Tantra, it is symbolized by the vajra and the male aspect. Also counted as seventh of the ten Perfections. [RY]
 
 
 
means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab); as terma signs; e and vam; in Vajrayana; union of; unity of; vowels and consonants [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab); Skt. prajna and upaya. Buddhahood is attained by uniting means and knowledge; in Mahayana, compassion and emptiness, relative and ultimate bodhichitta. In Vajrayana, means and knowledge are the stages of development and completion. According to the Kagyu schools, means refers specifically to the 'path of means,' the Six Doctrines of Naropa and knowledge to the 'path of liberation,' the actual practice of Mahamudra. According to Dzogchen, 'knowledge' is the view of primordial purity, the Trekchö practice of realizing the heart of enlightenment in the present moment, while 'means' is the meditation of spontaneous presence, the Tögal practice of exhausting defilements and fixation through which the rainbow body is realized within one lifetime. [RY]
 
 
 
means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab); Skt. prajna and upaya. Buddhahood is attained by uniting means and knowledge; in Mahayana, compassion and emptiness, relative and ultimate bodhichitta. In Vajrayana, means and knowledge are the stages of development and completion. According to the Kagyu schools, means refers specifically to the 'path of means,' the Six Doctrines of Naropa and knowledge to the 'path of liberation,' the actual practice of Mahamudra. According to Dzogchen, 'knowledge' is the view of primordial purity, the Trekchö practice of realizing the heart of enlightenment in the present moment, while 'means' is the meditation of spontaneous presence, the Tögal practice of exhausting defilements and fixation through which the rainbow body is realized within one lifetime.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Means and knowledge (thabs dang shes rab, prajna and upaya). Generally, buddhahood is attained by uniting the two aspects of means and knowledge; in Mahayana, compassion and emptiness; and in Vajrayana, the stages of development and completion. According to the Kagyu schools in particular, these two aspects are the 'path of means,' referring to the Six Doctrines and the 'path of liberation,' referring to the actual practice of Mahamudra. [RY]
 
 
 
means and knowledge; as terma signs; e and wam; expl.; in Vajrayana; union of; unity of; vowels and consonants; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
means and liberation (thabs grol); of Mahayoga [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
means and liberation; of Mahayoga [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
means. Means:- Sanskrit: upaya. Tibetan: thabs. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
meat-eating - According to some Hinayana treatises, meat-eating is tolerated to a certain extent, under the so-called "three conditions": 1) that one has not killed the animal oneself; 2) that one has not ordered its killing; 3) that it has not been purposely killed for one's own consumption. The Mahayana view understands that meat is sold purely because of consumer demand. Therefore, only the meat of animals who have died of natural or accidental causes is suitable to be eaten, a rare occurrence. In Mahayana sutras it is explained that applying the "three conditions" to oneself is a method that should result in one's becoming more aware and responsible, and thus help one to stop eating meat. It is not intended to suggest that, even though these "three conditions" may have been met, eating meat is suitable for a Buddhist practitioner. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Medicine Buddha {sangs rgyas sman lha}. When he was a Bodhisattva he promised to cure the illnesses of those who recite his mantra. [RY]
 
 
 
Medicine drubchen (sman gyi sgrub chen). sman sgrub, [RY]
 
medicine" made of eight primary and a thousand secondary ingredients. Medicine here is another name for amrita, specifically the kind manufactured from the thousand and eight ingredients [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
medicine. Medicine is the term used for amrita when it is offered together with torma and rakta. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Meditating (sgom pa). In the context of learning, contemplating and meditating, it means the act of assimilating the teachings into one's personal experience, growing accustomed to them through actual practice. [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation (dhyana, bsam gtan). The fifth Perfection, see Dhyana; (dhyana, mnyam bzhag). Gesture of both hands flat with palms upward, right fingers resting on the left, thumbs slightly bent with the tips touching. [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation (sgom pa). In the context of Mahamudra or Dzogchen practice, meditation is the act of growing accustomed to or sustaining the continuity of the recognition of our buddha nature as pointed out by a qualified master. In the context of learning, contemplating and meditating, it means the act of assimilating the teachings into one's personal experience, growing accustomed to them through actual practice. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
MEDITATION (sgom pa). In the context of Mahamudra or Dzogchen practice, meditation is the act of growing accustomed to or sustaining the continuity of the recognition of our buddha nature as pointed out by a qualified master. In the context of learning, contemplating and meditating, it means the act of assimilating the teachings into one's personal experience, then growing accustomed to them through actual practice. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation (sgom pa). In the context of Mahamudra practice, meditation 'the act of growing accustomed' or 'sustaining the continuity.' [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation Accomplishment Scripture (bsgom don grub pa'i lung). One of the Eighteen Major Scriptures of the Mind Section of Dzogchen. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation and postmeditation (mnyam bzhag dang rjes thob). 'Meditation' here means resting in equanimity free from mental constructs, like pure space. 'Postmeditation' is when distracted from that state of equanimity, and one conceptually regards appearances as an illusion, mirage, dream, etc. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation and postmeditation (mnyam bzhag dang rjes thob). 'Meditation' here means resting in equanimity free from mental constructs. 'Postmeditation' is when being distracted from that state of equanimity. [RY]
 
 
 
meditation state of the solitude of mind (yid dben mnyam bzhag) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Meditation Temple (bsam gtan gling). A temple at Samye. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Meditator (sgom chen). A person who spends all the time on meditation practice, often in mountain retreats. The special connotation is a full time practitioner of ordinary mind or unfabricated naturalness. [RY]
 
 
 
Medium Prajnaparamita (yum bar ma) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Medium Prajnaparamita (yum bar ma); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Melong Dorje (me long rdo rje). (1243-1303) A great Tibetan master in the Oral Lineage of the Nyingma School. [RY]
 
 
 
Melong Dorje: 1243-1303 [MR]
 
 
 
Menander - Most powerful Bactrian king; portrayed in The Questions of King Milinda as a convert to Buddhism [RY]
 
 
 
Menander - Most powerful Bactrian king; portrayed in The Questions of King Milinda as a convert to Buddhism. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Mending-purification (gso sbyong). A ritual for mending vows and purifying breaches.[EMP] [RY]
 
 
 
Men-ngag De. [RY]
 
 
 
Mental body (yid kyi lus). An immaterial body formed of habitual tendencies, quite like the imagined physical form we have while dreaming. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
mental cognition (yid kyi rnam shes). See also mind consciousness [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mental constructs (spros pa). [RY]
 
 
 
Menyag-rab Ridge [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Merit (bsod nams). The positive karmic result from virtuous actions. [RY]
 
 
 
Merit (punya, bsod nams; sometimes dge ba); Field of (Accumulation of) M. Tshogs zhing); Merits and Wisdom (tshogs (gnyis)). [RY]
 
 
 
Meru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the world surrounded by four continents of which the southern in our known world, Jambudvipa. [RY]
 
 
 
Meru (rme ru) included the New and Old Residences (rme ru rnying pa and rme ru gsar pa). The Old Meru was the seat of the Nechung State Oracle. Shi De (bzhi sde) is the area where resided Reting Rinpoche (rwa sgreng). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Meru, Mount (ri rab (lhun po), lhun po ). Giant mountain at the center of the world, where the two lowest classes of gods of the Desire Realm live. It is said to rise 84000 leagues above sea-level. [RY]
 
 
 
Merutse (me ru tse). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mesho Dzomnang. [RY]
 
 
 
Mesho. [RY]
 
Metaphors for the Graded Path, "Heap of Jewels" (dpe'i lam rim rin chen spungs pa) was composed by Geshe Potowa (dge bshes po to ba, 1031-1105), a great Kadampa master. The text consists of hundreds of metaphors on all aspects of the path. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Metok Trengdze. [RY]
 
 
 
Meu-po - Chinese monk who established Buddhism in Vietnam [RY]
 
 
 
Meu-po - Chinese monk who established Buddhism in Vietnam. [Tarthang]
 
 
 
Meyshö [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Middle (dbu ma). Same as [[Madhyamaka]]. [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Dharma Wheel. See Dharma Wheels [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Dharma Wheel; expl. [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Way (dbu ma). See [[Madhyamaka]]. [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Way (dbu ma); as the sugata essence; Great Middle; Padmasambhava's definition; view of; viewpoint of the noble potential [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Way (dbu ma); Skt. madhyamaka. The highest of the four Buddhist schools of philosophy. The Middle Way means not holding any extreme views, especially those of eternalism or nihilism. [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Way. Skt. madhyamaka. The highest of the four Buddhist schools of philosophy. The Middle Way means not holding any extreme views, especially those of eternalism or nihilism.[Primer] [RY]
 
 
 
Middle Way; as the sugata essence; expl.; view of; viewpoint of the noble potential [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mighty Lotus (padma dbang chen). Same as the tantric deity Hayagriva, the chief heruka of the padma family. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mighty Lotus Tantra (padma dbang chen gyi rgyud). Several Mahayoga tantras with resembling names occur in Vol. HA of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mighty Padma (pad ma dbang) (Hayagriva); transmission of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mighty Padma (pad ma dbang); transmission of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Migrators, Migrating beings, jagat, ('gro ba) or ('gro rnams). Sentient beings, wandering continually from one samsaric existence to another. [RY]
 
 
 
Miktsema (dmigs brtse ma), a prayer to Je Tsongkhapa (1357-1419), considered as inseparable from Avalokitesvara, Manjusri, and Vajrapani. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mikyö Dorje, Karmapa VIII: 1507-1554 [MR]
 
 
 
Mila Phuk in Nyelam; (mi la phug) Near Pelgyeling Monastery (the Place of Increase and Expansion, a name given by Milarepa himself). The monastery was built upon one the Namkha Ding; Phug (Garuda Cave /Hovering in Space) where Milarepa meditated during several years, in the Nyelam valley (near the village of Shongang.) A litlle above is the Rechungpa's cave. Nyelam; means the Path of Hell, referring to the tortuous passage dwon the Po Chu gorge to Shammo. [MR]
 
 
 
Milarepa (mi la ras pa) 1040-1123. One of the most famous yogis and poets in Tibetan religious history. Much of the teachings of the Karma Kagyü schools passed through him. For more details read The Life of Milarepa and The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, Shambhala Publications. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
MILAREPA (mi la ras pa). (1040-1123). One of the most famous yogis and poets in Tibetan religious history. Much of the teachings of the Karma Kagyü schools passed through him. For more details read The Life of Milarepa and The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa (Shambhala Publications). His name means 'Cotton-clad Mila.'[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Milarepa (mi la ras pa). A great yogin and major Kagyu lineage holder. Tibetan master and the chief disciple of Marpa. See the book "The Life of Milarepa" translated by L. Lhalungpa, Shambhala Publications. [RY]
 
 
 
Milarepa / Mi la ras pa - Disciple of Marpa; Tibet's greatest mystic poet [RY]
 
 
 
Milarepa [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Milarepa: 1040- 1123 (1052-1135?) [MR]
 
 
 
Milky Lake ('o ma can gyi rgya mtsho) in the south-western direction [RY]
 
 
 
Mind and prana (rlung sems). 'Prana' here is the 'wind of karma,' the current of conceptual thinking, as well as the energy-currents in the body. 'Mind' is the dualistic consciousness of an unenlightened being. These two are closely related. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind and Space Sections (sems klong kyi sde). The first two of the three sections of Dzogchen. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam par shes pa). According to Abhidharma, one of the eight consciousnesses. Its function is to discriminate and label things. [RY]
 
 
 
mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam par shes pa); conceptual (yid shes rtog bcas); definition of; expl.; explanation of two aspects; two aspects of; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
mind consciousness (yid kyi rnam shes); definition of; explanation of two aspects; two aspects of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
mind consciousness; conceptual (yid shes rtog bcas); [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind essence (sems ngo). (sems nyid), The nature of mind, synonym for 'buddha nature.' It should be distinguished from 'mind' (sems), which refers to ordinary discursive thinking based on ignorance. 'Mind essence' is the basic space from and within which these thoughts take place. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind essence (sems nyid). (sems ngo). The nature of mind. A synonym for 'buddha nature.' [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Lineage of the Victorious Ones (rgyal ba dgongs brgyud). The first of the three lineages of the Nyingma School. Usually, it refers to the transmission from Buddha Samantabhadra to Garab Dorje of teachings beyond words and symbols. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa), Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of India. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa), Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of Buddhist philosophy propagated by the great master Asanga and his followers. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra and other scriptures, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. Positively, this view relinquishes the fixation on a solid reality. Negatively, there is still clinging to a truly existing 'mind' within which everything takes place.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School (sems tsam pa); definition of name; detailed; expl. view; viewpoint of the noble potential [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School of Equal Number Perceiver and Perceived (gzung 'dzin grangs mnyam pa'i sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School of Nondual Variety (sna tshogs gnyis med pa'i sems tsam rnam bden pa). [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School of Nondual Variety (sna tshogs gnyis med sems tsam rnam bden pa) [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only School of Split Egg Shell (sgo nga phyed 'tshal sems tsam rnam bden pa) [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only. Chittamatra. A Mahayana school of India. Founded on the Lankavatara Sutra, its main premise is that all phenomena are only mind, i.e. mental perceptions that appear within the all-ground consciousness due to habitual tendencies. Positively, this view relinquishes the fixation on a solid reality. Negatively, there is still clinging to a truly existing 'mind' within which everything takes place.[Primer] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Only; definition of name; detailed expl.; expl. view; viewpoint of the noble potential [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Seat of Chokgyur Lingpa [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Section (sems sde). The first of the Three Sections of Dzogchen. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Section (sems sde). The first of the Three Sections of Dzogchen. In this book twenty-five tantras and eighteen major scriptures are mentioned. Most are found in the first three volumes of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Section (sems sde); of Dzogchen [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Section of Dzogchen (rdzogs chen sems sde). The first of the three sections of Dzogchen. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Section; of Dzogchen [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind sections {sems sde}. Aspect of the Dzogchen tantras. [RY]
 
 
 
MIND TERMA (dgongs gter). A revelation directly within the mind of a great master, without the need for a terma of material substance. The teachings revealed in this way were implanted within the 'indestructible sphere' at the time when the master in a former life was one of Padmasambhava's disciples.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Training (blo sbyong). See Lojong. [RY]
 
 
 
mind training (blo sbyong); detailed; tong-len practice [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Training on Cutting All Ties of Attachment. This refers to the legs bshad zhen 'khris kun gcod one of the many blo sbyong teachings written by Chen-ngawa Lodrö Gyaltsen (1402-72). See Translator's Introduction, p.xxi. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
mind training; detailed expl.; tong-len practice [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Treasure (dgongs gter); among the seven transmissions [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind Treasure (dgongs gter); among the seven transmissions [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind treasures (dgongs gter) are termas concealed by Guru Padmasambhava in the mind-stream of the Treasure-discoverer (gter ston). They manifest clearly to the Tertön at the appropriate time. (See Appendix 1). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mind, Sign and Hearing Lineages (dgongs brda snyan brgyud). See Three Lineages. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind, Space and Instruction Sections (sems klong man ngag gi sde gsum). After Garab Dorje established the six million four hundred thousand tantras of Dzogchen in the human world, his chief disciple, Manjushrimitra, arranged these tantras into three categories: the Mind Section emphasizing luminosity, the Space Section emphasizing emptiness, and the Instruction Section emphasizing their inseparability. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-Attainment Secret-Union Secret-Document Essential-Instructions". Mind-Attainment Secret-Union Secret-Document Essential-Instructions: "Mind-Attainment" in Tibetan is thugs sgrub, and refers to Padmakara practices. This terma is quoted from repeatedly in this instruction-text, though with variations in the title, none of which are listed in Kongtrül's "Treasury of Termas". : "In practicing me, all Buddhas are practiced, Seeing me, all Buddhas are seen, I am the union of the Sugatas." [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mind-Attainment. Mind-Attainment: thugs sgrub. A Padmasambhava practice of the terma tradition. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mind-essence (sems nyid). The nature of one's mind which is taught to be identical with the essence of all enlightened beings, the sugata garbha. It should be distinguished from 'mind' (sems) which refers to ordinary discursive thinking based on ignorance of the nature of thought. [RY]
 
 
 
Mindfulness (dran pa). Has different connotation according to the different vehicles. Here, it means nondistraction. [RY]
 
 
 
Mindfulness of deliberate attention (rtsol bcas 'du byed kyi dran pa). Artificial or forced mindfulness. [RY]
 
 
 
mind-lineage of the Buddhas. The mind-lineage of the Buddhas, the first part of the transmission of the higher Nyingma teachings, is the direct mind transmission that takes place in the unsurpassable Buddha realm, Akanishta. The transmission is from the Dharmakaya Buddha to Bodhisattvas of complete realisation, who are themselves sambhogakaya deities, who are inseparable from the Dharmakaya. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mind-only School (sems tsam pa, cittamatra). A Mahayana school of India. [RY]
 
 
 
Mindröl Ling [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mindröl Ling Monastery [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mindrol Ling. [RY]
 
 
 
Mindröl Ling; expl. [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mindröl Norbu Ling [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mindroling (smin grol gling) was founded in 1670, by Terdak Lingpa (see chap.1, note 38) and is one the six principal Nyingma monasteries in Tibet (see Glossary of Enumerations). On the Mindroling tradition see NS, p.825. The throne of Mindroling is traditionally held by successive descendants of Terdak Lingpa. The Jetsunmas are his female descendants, who have always played an important role in the preservation of the teachings. Many of them have been remarkable teachers themselves. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mindroling Gonpa built: 1670 [MR]
 
 
 
mind-stream (rgyud, sems rgyud). [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-stream (sems rgyud). The individual continuity of cognition. [RY]
 
 
 
Mind-treasure. [RY]
 
 
 
Ming (chinese) 1360-1644. [RY]
 
 
 
Minling Chung Rinpoche. [RY]
 
 
 
Minling Dorsem; terma given to Rigdzin Terdag Lingpa at ngam shod gnam lcags brag by Ekajati in person. Also called:zhi ba rdo rje dbyings gsang chen rigs gcig dpal rdo rje sems dpa' thugs kyi sgrub pa. [more info: Terdzö KHA/KHA 66-68] Placed as the first sadhana in the Rinchen Terdzö since Vajrasattva is the pervader of all mandalas. [RY]
 
 
 
Minling Lochen Dharma Shri: 1654-1717 [MR]
 
 
 
Minling Terchen Terdag Lingpa, Gyurme Dorje (smin gling gter chen gter bdag gling pa 'gyur med rdo rje): 1646-1714. [MR]
 
 
 
Minling Terchen Terdak Lingpa, Gyurme Dorje (smin gling gter chen gter bdag gling pa 'gyur med rdo rje, 1646-1714). A disciple as well as a teacher of the fifth Dalai Lama, Terdak Lingpa revealed major termas, compiled the canonical scriptures of the Nyingma tradition (rnying ma bka' ma), and, with his brother Minling Lochen Dharma Shri (smin gling lo chen dharma sri, 1654-1718), played a major role in ensuring the continuity of the exegetical tradition of the Guhyagarbha Tantra (Tantra of the Secret Quintessence, NGB, vol. 14, no. 187). See NS, pp. 825-34. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Minling Trichen. [RY]
 
 
 
Mipham Gönpo (mi pham mgon po). Identical to Bomting Chöje Miphampa, the incarnate lama who requested the teachings presented in this book. A great master of the Drukpa Kagyü lineage.[EMP] [RY]
 
 
 
Mipham Rinpoche (1846-1912) A student of Jamgön Kongtrül, Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Paltrul Rinpoche. Blessed by Manjushri, he became one of the greatest scholars of his time. His collected works fill more than 30 volumes. His chief disciple was Shechen Gyaltsab Pema Namgyal. Mipham was a close student of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and regarded as a direct emanation of Manjushri. [RY]
 
 
 
Mipham Rinpoche (mi pham rin po che). Great Nyingma master and writer of the last century. [RY]
 
 
 
Mipham Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mipham Rinpoche; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
miraculous power of mastery over wind and mind [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Miraculous powers (rdzu 'phrul). [RY]
 
 
 
Mirror of Magical Display (sgyu 'phrul me long) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mirror of Magical Display; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mirror of Mindfulness by Tsele Natsok Rangdröl, Shambhala Publications, Boston. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mirror-like wisdom (me long lta bu'i ye shes). One of the five wisdoms. The transmutation of anger. [RY]
 
 
 
Misdeeds (sdig pa), mi dge ba'i las). This word refers chiefly to the ten unvirtuous actions. [RY]
 
 
 
misdeeds (sdig pa). See also karma; sub-aspects of [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
misdeeds [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
misdeeds; sub-aspects of [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
mistaken cognition ('khrul pa'i sems); as synonym for the all-ground [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
mistaken dependent phenomena ('khrul pa'i gzhan dbang) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mitra Yogin; (mi tra dzo gi). A siddha from India who received teachings from Chenrezig who appeared to him. The transmission of his "Six Vajra Yogas" is still alive and can be found in Volume 16 (Ma) of the gdams ngag mdzod of Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul blo gros mtha' yas, 1813-1899). [MR]
 
 
 
Mitradzoki. [RY]
 
 
 
Miyowa. [RY]
 
 
 
Mleccha (kla klo). Barbarian, one ignorant of Sanskrit. [RY]
 
 
 
Momentary defilement (glo bur gyi dri ma). The obscurations that are not intrinsic to the buddha nature, like clouds are not inherent in the sky. [RY]
 
 
 
Mon (mon) Name for lands to the south and southwest of Tibet. [Rain of Wisdom]
 
 
 
Mön [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Monastic study center. [RY]
 
 
 
Mön-gong Cave (mon gong brag phug). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Monkey Meditator (sprel sgom) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Monkey Meditator (sprel sgom) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Monkey meditator (sprel sgom), [RY]
 
 
 
Monkey-faced Chieftain of Shang (zhang blon sprel zha can). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mönkha (mon kha). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Monkha Senge Dzong (mon kha seng ge rdzong). a cave situated to the east of Bumthang in Bhutan which was used by Padmasambhava and later by Yeshe Tsogyal as a sacred place for sadhana. [RY]
 
 
 
Month of miracles. The first month of the lunar year, the first two weeks of which is said to be the time that the Buddha manifested miracles at Shravasti to overcome the challenges of non-Buddhist teachers. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Möntha Dragtha Tramo (mon mtha' brag mtha' khra mo). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Moon with a garland of stars (zla ba skar phreng). The first of 'four aspects of approach and accomplishment.' [RY]
 
 
 
Moons of Speech. Syn. buddha [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Moons of Speech; alias buddha [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Moral discipline {tshul khrims}. One of the six transcending perfections. [RY]
 
 
 
Morality (shila, tshul khrims). The second Perfections. [RY]
 
 
 
Most of the money circulating in Tibet in the second half of the eighteenth century was Nepalese silver coins. Although some were made of pure silver and some of 50 per cent alloy, they all circulated in Tibet at the same value (see Rhodes 1980). In 1768-69, Prithvi Narayan Shah, chief of Gorkha (a principality thirty miles west of Kathmandu) overthrew the Newari rulers in Kathmandu Valley and conquered most of the other areas of what is now Nepal. He then demonetized the debased coins, which became valued at half of those made of fine silver. This devaluation was not accepted by Tibetans, to whom it would have caused great losses. Trouble broke out in 1786, just after the regent-king of Tibet, Tsemön Ling Ngawang Tsultrim, had been invited to China. In 1788, the Gorkhali army invaded Tibet. In 1789 a treaty was signed in favor of the Gorkhalis, who withdrew their troops. Returning from China, the Tsemön Ling regent scolded his ministers for their feebleness in dealing with the Gorkhalis, but he died in 1791. In one incident, Tibetan negotiators who had come to Nyanang were killed, or taken prisoner by the Gorkhalis in a trap set on the occasion of a religious festival, during which Gorkhali soldiers had disguised themselves as merchants and coolies. In 1791, a strong Gorkhali army of eighteen thousand men again invaded Tibet as far as Tashi Lhunpo. The Tibetan army counterattacked and pushed the Gorkhali forces back to Nyanang. At that point, thirteen thousand Manchu troops arrived in Tibet and joined the ten thousand Tibetans soldiers. Together they drove the Gorkhalis back to within twenty miles of Kahtmandu. In 1792, a treaty was signed between Nepal, Tibet, and China. In Lhasa, the populace began to protest against the presence of the Chinese army, which, they said, had entered Tibet unasked for, and had caused more harm to the Tibetans than the Gorkhalis themselves. Following this, the two Ambans were removed for misconduct and returned to China. The new Ambans sent to Lhasa retained a little power for some time, but this power vanished soon after the death of Emperor Qianlong in 1796. After a period of intrigue, one of the Ambans was returned to China in chains and the other one exiled to Chinese Turkestan. A few more Ambans were sent to Lhasa. The last one was expelled in 1912, under the thirteenth Dalai Lama. After this, the Chinese lost their influence in Tibet until the 1950 invasion (See Shakabpa, 1976 and 1984). [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Most Secret and Unsurpassable Dagger (phur pa yang gsang bla med): rediscovered by Chögyal Ratna Lingpa (chos rgyal ratna gling pa, 1403-78). Ratna Lingpa is said to be the only Tertön who always met with perfectly auspicious circumstances (rten 'brel) and could thus find the complete set of termas that were prophecied to him. On the life-story of this master and the account of his revelations, see Collected Rediscovered Teachings of Ratna gLing-pa, vols. 1 and 2, as well as NS, pp. 793-95. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Most Secret Vajra Tantra (rdo rje rab tu gsang ba'i rgyud). One of the Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Most Supreme (che mchog). Chemchok Heruka. Usually identical with Nectar Quality, the chief heruka of the ratna family. Sometimes, in the case of Assemblage of Sugatas, the Most Supreme is the heruka who embodies all the buddha families. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Most Supreme Display Root Tantra (che mchog rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga; focused on Nectar Quality. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Deities (ma mo). See mamo. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Deities Assemblage Tantra (ma mo 'dus pa'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. Found in Vol. A of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Deities Display Root Tantra (ma mo rol pa rtsa ba'i rgyud). Tantra belonging to the Sadhana Section of Mahayoga. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother luminosity (ma'i 'od gsal). The ground luminosity of the natural state inherent as the enlightened essence of all sentient beings. [RY]
 
 
 
Mother of Knowledge by Namkhai Nyingpo, translated by Tarthang Tulku, Dharma Publishing, Berkeley. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Scripture (Prajnaparamita) (yum) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Scripture (Prajnaparamita); quotation from [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Tantra (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which place emphasis on completion stage or prajna. Sometimes equivalent of Anu Yoga. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Tantra (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which place emphasis on completion stage. [RY]
 
 
 
MOTHER TANTRA (ma rgyud). One of the three aspects of Anuttara Yoga which places emphasis on completion stage or prajna. Sometimes equivalent to Anu Yoga. [AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother tantra (ma rgyud). Tantras of the Anuttara yoga class are divided into Father tantras such as the Guhyasamaja, which emphasize the Method side, the practice of the Illusory Body; and Mother tantra such as the Samvara and hevajra, which emphasize more the Wisdom side, the indivisibility of Bliss and Emptiness. [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Tantra (ma rgyud); as Anu Yoga [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Tantra [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mother Tantra Anu Yoga (ma rgyud a nu yo ga) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Hepori (has po ri). See Hepori. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Kailash 1.  Usually accessed via Purang (Taklakot). On the circumambulation path of the mountain itself there used to be four monastery, Gyangtra to the south, Nyenri to the west (*), Dri ra Phuk to the norht and Zutrul Phuk to the south. All four were practically destroyed during the Chinese invasion but are now under restoration (exept for Nyenri). The starting point for the circumambulation is Darchen, a sheep-trading center and the main village in the area. After a few hours westward one reaches Tarpoche a grassy valley filled with prayer flags where Buddhist festival used to be held. One hour north of Tarpoche are the ruins of Nyenri Monastery and Langchen Phuk a cave blessed by Guru Padmasambhava. At Chugu there are a lot of mani stones and Pema Phuk a cave blessed by Buddha Shakyamuni. Then come accross a large rock known as Guru Padmasambhava' torma. Then one passes three peaks associated with the three deities of longevity (Amitayus, White Tara, and Vijaya). [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Kailash 2. The one reaches Dira Phuk from where one can see the northern face of Mt Kailash and the mountains of the Protectors of the Three Kinds of Beings (Mnajushri to the west, and Avalokiteshvara and Vajrapani to the east). Then cross the Drolma La (5670 m). On the way up to the pass is Vajrayogini Cemetery, still used to deposit the bodies of those who die while on pilgrimage. After the pass one sees the Tukje Chenpo Lake (Gori Kund). From the bottom of the slopes one takes the eastern valley for five hours to Zutrul Phuk. The monastery has been recently rebuild around the cave itself. From there in 5-6 hrs one reaches back to Darchen. North from Darchen on can go to Gyangtra, now rebuilt by Drigung monks, and then to the ruins of Sera Lung Monastery. From there to go closer to the mountain itself one needs to have completed 13 circumambulations of the moutain. One then reaches the moraines of the south face of Kailash. There used to be there 13 stupas with relics of Patriarchs of the Drigung lineage. Slightly off this route are the two small lakes of Tso Kapala. [MR]
 
 
 
Mount Malaya (ri bo ma la ya). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Meru - world axis; the mountain at the center of a world system, ringed by chains of lesser mountains lakes, continents, and oceans. [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Meru (ri rab). Same as 'Mt. Sumeru.' [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Meru {ri rab}. The axis of the universe according to traditional Hindu-Buddhist cosmology. [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Potala (ri bo gru 'dzin). [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Potala. See Potala [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Sumeru (ri rab lhun po). The mythological giant mountain at the center of our world-system surrounded by the four continents, where the two lowest classes of gods of the Desire Realm live. It is encircled by chains of lesser mountains, lakes, continents, and oceans and is said to rise 84000 leagues above sea-level. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the world surrounded by the four continents. [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Sumeru [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
MOUNT SUMERU AND THE FOUR CONTINENTS MOUNT SUMERU (ri rab lhun po gling bzhi dang bcas pa). The mythological giant mountain at the center of our world-system surrounded by the four continents, where the two lowest classes of gods of the Desire Realm live. It is encircled by chains of lesser mountains, lakes, continents, and oceans and is said to rise 84,000 leagues above sea-level. Our present world is situated on the southern continent called Jambudvipa.[AL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mount Tisey [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mountain Dharma (ri chos), intended for those living simple lives meditating in the mountains, where they would not be able to perform elaborate rituals. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mountain Pile (ri bo brtsegs pa). See Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mrdanga (rdza rnga). A kind of large drum. [RY]
 
 
 
Mt. Sumeru (ri rab). The mountain in the center of the world surrounded by the four continents. [RY]
 
 
 
Mudra (phyag rgya) gestures symbolizing particular spiritual attributes or steps toward perfection. There are technically four types of mudra: the symbolic seal (Skt. Upayamudra, Dam tshig phyag rgya); the female partner in tantric practices or the visualized partner who represents Pristine Awareness (Skt. Karmamudra or Jnanamudra, Las kyi phyag rgya or Ye shes kyi phyag rgya); the seal of the Absolute (Skt. Dharmamudra, Chos kyi phyag rgya); and the Great Seal (Skt. Mahamudra, Phyag rgya chen po). [RY]
 
 
 
Mudra (phyag rgya). Can mean either 'hand gesture,' spiritual consort, or the 'bodily form' of a deity. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mudra (phyag rgya). Lit. 'seal, token.' 1. A symbolic hand gesture, endowed with power not unlike a mantra. 2. A tantric consort. [RY]
 
 
 
Mudra of equanimity (mnyam bzhag gi phyag rgya). The hands placed in the gesture of meditation just as Buddha Amitabha. [RY]
 
 
 
Mudra of expounding the Dharma (chos 'chad pa'i phyag rgya) [RY]
 
 
 
mudra yoga. The mudra or "seal" yoga, means the visualisation of the deity's body. [Peter Roberts]
 
 
 
Mukhale [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mulasarvastivadin - One of the eighteen schools, preserved as a Vinaya lineage of Tibet [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane beings are the six classes of sentient beings. [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane dakinis. [Daki] [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane dhyana ('jig rten pa'i bsam gtan). A meditation state characterized by attachment, especially to bliss, clarity and nonthought, and lacking insight into the emptiness of a self-entity. [RY]
 
 
 
mundane dhyanas ('jig rten pa'i bsam gtan) [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
mundane dhyanas [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane Mother Deities' ('jig rten ma mo). [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane Mother Deities ('jig rten ma mo). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. Female divinities manifested out of dharmadhatu but appearing in ways that correspond to mundane appearances through the interrelationship between the mundane world and the channels, winds, and essences within our body. They have both an ultimate and relative aspect. The chief figure in this mandala is Chemchok Heruka, the wrathful form of Buddha Samantabhadra in the form known as Ngöndzok Gyalpo, the King of True Perfection. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane samadhis ('jig rten pa'i ting nge 'dzin). Similar to 'mundane dhyana.' [RY]
 
 
 
mundane wisdom resulting from meditation (sgom byung 'jig rten pa'i ye shes) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane Worship ('jig rten mchod bstod). One of the Eight Sadhana Teachings. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mundane Worship (mchod bstod) [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mune Tsenpo: 774- [MR]
 
 
 
Muney Tsenpo (mu ne btsan po). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Muney Tsenpo, son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]
 
 
 
Muni (thub pa). The six munis are the six emanations of Samantabhadra which tame the beings of the six realms. [RY]
 
 
 
Murderous Yakshas (srog gcod gnod sbyin). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Muri Tsenpo (mu ri btsan po) [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tsenpo Son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tsenpo. [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tseypo (mu rub btsad po). The youngest son of Trisong Deutsen also known as Prince Virtuous Protector. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tseypo. Also incarnated as Do Drubchen. [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tseypo; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Murub Tseypo; background information on the past life of Chokgyur Lingpa by H.H. Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche; Prince Damdzin; Prince Translator [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mustang - The ancient Tibetan kingdom of Lo Mantang or Mustang, incorporated into Nepal in the late eighteenth century, following the Gurkha war. Ngari Panchen Pema Wangyal (mnga' ris pan chen padma dbang rgyal, 1487-1542), as well as many learned Sakya teachers, originated from Mustang. See D.P. Jackson, The Mollas of Mustang, LTWA, 1984. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mutig Tseypo (mu tig btsad po). The second son of Trisong Deutsen also known as Seyna-lek Jing-yön. [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
Mutri Tsenpo, son of King Trisong Deutsen. [RY]
 
 
 
Mutri Tseypo. See Murub Tseypo [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
Mutri Tseypo; [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
Mutsamey (mu tsa me). [ZL] [RY]
 
 
 
mutually co-operating cause (lhan cig byed pa'i rgyu); in terms of ignorance [LWx] [RY]
 
 
 
mutually cooperating cause (lhan cig byed pa'i rgyu); in terms of ignorance [LW1] [RY]
 
 
 
myrobalan - all-victorious myrobalan (rnam rgyal a ru ra, Lat. Terminalia chebula), renowned as the panacea, is a dry fruit used in the preparation of many herbal and sacramental medicines. [MR-ShabkarNotes]
 
 
 
Mysteries of body, speech and mind (sku gsung thugs kyi gsang ba). The vajra body, speech and mind. [RY]
 
 
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'''[[The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity]]''' (Front Cover)
 
'''[[The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity]]''' (Front Cover)

Revision as of 16:07, 12 February 2006

M


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Machen - The mighty Amnye Machen Range, the "Great Peacock Ancestor" (a myes rma chen), also called Magyal Pomra (rma rgyal spom ra), or Machen Pomra (rma chen spom ra), stands in the great curve of the Machu River (which becomes the Yellow River in China), to the east of two great lakes, known in Mongolian as Tsaring Nor and Oring Nor (Tib. skya rangs mtsho and sngo rangs mtsho). This sacred mountain is said to be the abode of Machen Pomra, a powerful protector of the Dharma who, after having being subjugated by Guru Padmasambhava, became a Bodhisattva of the tenth spiritual level (bhumi). In his History of the Dharma Protectors (dam can bstan srung rgya mtsho'i rnam thar, vol. 1, p.142), Lelung Shepai Dorje (sle lung bzhad pa'i rdo rje, b.1697) presents Magyal Pomra as the chief of 360 surrounding mountain-gods, led by four main ones, one in each of the four directions (among whom is gnyan chen thang lha, in the north). Magyal Pomra is said to be married to Gungmen Lhari (gung sman lha ri) and to have nine sons and nine daughters. When, at Samye, Guru Padmasambhava bound under oath the devas and raksas, he omitted to subjugate Machen Pomra. The Bönpos rejoiced greatly, but after Guru Padmasambhava made the summoning mudra, Machen came, arrogantly putting one foot on top of Hepori at Samye and keeping one foot in Amdo. Guru Padmasambhava bound Machen under oath, yet the latter remained one of the haughtiest among the wild spirits. There are eight great peaks in the Machen range, of which the three most prominent are: Amnye Machen itself, in the center, the lowest of the three, at 6282 meters; Chenrezi (spyan ras gzigs), to the south, the medium peak; and Dradul Lung Shok (dgra 'dul rlung gshog), to the north, the highest. It takes a week to perform the circumambulation of the whole range on foot, and more than a month when making prostrations the entire way, as many faithful pilgrims do. Pilgrims gather in especially great numbers every twelve years, in the Horse Year. See K. Buffetrille (1992) and Galen Rowell (1984). The ruins of Shabkar's stone hermitage are still clearly recognizable (see Buffetrille, 1992). Pilgrims who perform the circumambulation of Amnye Machen often visit the site, which is located at a place called Mowatowa (mo ba gto ba), on the west side of the range, in between the Height of the Supreme Horse (rta mchog gong pa) and before the Great Hanging Brocade Image (gos sku chen mo), a cliff of various hues, said to be the door curtain of Magyal's palace. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Machen Pomra (rma chen spom ra). A powerful local spirit from the area of Kham, the chief of twenty-one major local divinities. [ZL] [RY]

MACHIG LABDRÖN (ma gcig lab sgron). (1031-1129). The great female master who set down the Chö practice, cutting through ego-clinging. Disciple and consort of the Indian master Phadampa Sangye. Machig Labdrön means 'Only Mother Lamp of Dharma.'[AL] [RY]

Machik Labdron (ma gcig lab sgron). The great female master who set down the Chö practice. [RY]

Machik Labdrön : 1055-1143 (other dates found,:birht in 1099, or 1102; passed in 1155) [MR]

Machik Labdronma / Ma gcig Slab sgron ma - Disciple and consort of the Indian master Dam pa sang rgyas; leading figure in transmission of Zhi byed schools [RY]

Machik Lapkyi Drönma (ma gcig lab gyi sgron ma, 1055-1143?), the famed incarnation of Yeshe Tsogyal who became the consort and chief disciple of Padampa Sangye and spread the teachings of Chöd in Tibet. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Machu [LW1] [RY]

[[Madhyamaka]] (dbu ma). 'Middle Way System', highest philosophical system of Indian buddhism. [RY]

Madhyamaka (dbu ma); see 'Middle Way' [LWx] [RY]

Madhyamaka, "the middle", [RY]

Madhyamaka - Philosophical school linked to the Prajnaparamita; developed on the basis of Nagarjuna's teachings [RY]

Madhyamaka (dbu ma), the Middle Way, is the corpus of the highest philosophical view of the Mahayana, free from all limiting concepts. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Madhyamaka (dbu ma). The Middle (Way). The highest of the four buddhist schools of philosophy. The Middle Way means not holding any extreme views, especially those of eternalism or nihilism. [RY]

Madhyamaka (dbu ma). The Middle Way. The highest of the four Buddhist schools of philosophy. The Middle Way means not holding any extreme views, especially those of eternalism or nihilism. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Madhyamaka {du ma chen po}. Middle way. Madhyamaka has two main schools, Svatantrika and Prasangika. The first one considers that, in terms of absolute truth, phenomena have no true existence whatsoever; but in terms of relative truth, phenomena appear through the combination of causes and conditions, perform their function, and have a verifiable conventional existence. The second school asserts that, from both an absolute and a relative point of view, phenomena are totally devoid of existence and cannot be characterized by any concept such as "existent," "nonexistent," "both existent and nonexistent," or "neither existent nor nonexistent." For the Prasangikas, absolute truth is the nondual pristine wisdom of the Buddhas, free from conceptual elaboration. [RY]

Madhyantika - A disciple of Ananda who established the teachings in Kashmir; sometimes regarded as an eight patriarch [RY]

Madhyantika - A disciple of Ananda who established the teachings in Kashmir; sometimes regarded as an eighth patriarch. [Tarthang]

Magadha - Most powerful kingdom at the time of the Buddha; scene of many important events in the Buddha's life; later the home of Nalanda and other great universities [RY]

Magars, one of the largest Nepalese tribes. Of Tibetan origin, the Magars are often craftsmen, blacksmiths, bridge makers, salt traders, or warriors. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Magic wand. [RY]

Magical city of sign script (brda yig sprul pa'i grong khyer) because a city comprised of numerous words and meanings of treasure teachings are perceived within each single symbolic character. (H.H. DKR) [RY]

Magical display of the four conversions ('dul ba bzhi'i cho 'phrul) possessed by a nirmanakaya: Converting through the perfect deeds of his Body endowed with great merit; such as the Twelve Deeds (mdzad pa bcu gnyis) and so forth. Conversion through the direct perception of the great super-knowledges of his Mind which are the six super-knowledges (mngon shes drug). Conversion through the great miraculous power of his inconceivable Qualities and Activities which are the various magical displays of the deeds of his Three Secrets (gsang gsum). Conversion through the knowledge of teaching the five vehicles of his Speech or conversion through the Mahayana teaching of his Speech. The five vehicle are for gods, humans, shravaka and pratyekabuddhas, bodhisattvas, and the Secret Mantra. [RY]

magical display of the fourfold conversion ('dul ba bzhi'i cho 'phrul) [LW1] [RY]

magical display of the fourfold conversion ('dul ba bzhi'i cho 'phrul); expl. [LWx] [RY]

Magical Display of the Peaceful and Wrathful Ones (sgyu 'phrul zhi khro), Skt. Shanti Krodha Mayajala. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Display of the Peaceful and Wrathful Ones (zhi khro sgyu 'phrul). [EMP] [RY]

Magical Mirror (me long sgyu 'phrul). One of the eight divisions of Mayajala Tantras (sgyu 'phrul gyi rgyud). [RY]

Magical Net (Gyütrül) [LWx] [RY]

magical net (sgyu 'phrul drva ba) [LW1] [RY]

Magical net (sgyu 'phrul drva ba), mayajala. A collective term for the manifestations of enlightenment to tame whoever needs in whichever way is necessary. In particular, it refers to the various divinities and vidyadharas who are manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Magical Net (sgyu 'phrul). A collective term for the manifestations of enlightenment to tame whoever needs in whichever way is necessary. In this book the term refers to a collection of tantric scriptures belonging chiefly to Mahayoga. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Net {sgyu 'phrul dra ba}. Tantra of the Magical Net. Skt: mayajala-mahatantraraja. [RY]

Magical net of emanations (sprul pa'i sgyu 'phrul drva ba). See Magical Net. [RY]

Magical Net of Manjushri ('jam dpal sgyu 'phrul drva ba) [LW1] [RY]

Magical Net of Manjushri ('jam dpal sgyu 'phrul). A Mahayoga scripture. Vol. BA of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Net of Manjushri ('jam dpal sgyu 'phrul). A Mahayoga scripture. Vol. BA of the Nyingma Gyübum. Possibly identical with the Manjushri Namasangirti. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Net of Manjushri; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

Magical Net of the Goddess (lha mo sgyu 'phrul). A Mahayoga scripture. Vol. BA of the Nyingma Gyübum. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Net of the Vidyadharas (rig 'dzin sgyu 'phrul drva ba) [LW1] [RY]

Magical Net of Vairochana (rnam snang sgyu 'phrul drva ba). A Mahayoga scripture which functions as subsidiary support for engaging in yogic activities connected to the mandala. See Eighteen Mahayoga Tantras. [ZL] [RY]

Magical Net; Eight Sections [LW1] [RY]

Magical samadhi (sgyu ma lta bu'i ting nge 'dzin). The second of the three samadhis the nature of which is luminosity and compassion, spontaneous like the light of the sun shining in the sky. See also 'three samadhis.' [RY]

magic-weapon torma (thun gtor) [RY]

Magyal Phomra. [RY]

Magyü Sangwey Lamkyer (ma rgyud gsang ba'i lam khyer). Terma of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Maha (rnal 'byor chen po). The first of the Three Inner Tantras. [RY]

Maha (Skt., chen po). The usual abbreviation for 'Mahayoga.' [RY]

Maha {ma ha}. The first of the three inner yogas, which correspond to the seventh of the nine Vehicles according to the Nyingmapa school. [RY]

Maha ati (rdzogs chen). The third of the three inner tantras. For the most part synonymous with Dzogchen. [RY]

Maha ati. [RY]

Maha Ati. Within the Nyingma classification of six Tantrayanas, the three highest, the three "inner" Tantrayanas, are the Mahayoga, the Anuyoga and the Atiyoga, the Ati being the highest. [RY]

Maha Shri Heruka (dpal chen he ru ka) [LW1] [RY]

Maha, Anu, and Ati, - literal meaning of; See also 'Three Inner Tantras' [LW1] [RY]

Maha, anu, and ati. Mahayoga (chen po'i rnal 'byor) means great yoga. Anu Yoga (rjes su rnal 'byor) means subsequent yoga. Ati Yoga (shin tu rnal 'byor) means perfect yoga. [RY]

Mahabodhi (byang chub chen po), statue of the Buddha [LW1] [RY]

Mahabodhi [LWx] [RY]

Mahabodhi Temple (byang chub chen po). The enormous shrine in front of the bodhi tree at Vajra Seat, Bodhgaya. [ZL] [RY]

Mahabrahma (tshangs po chen po). 'Great Brahma', = Brahma. [RY]

Mahadeva - Monk said in several accounts to have originated the five points of controversy which led to the division into eighteen schools. [Tarthang]

Mahadeva (lha chen). A form of Shiva. [RY]

Mahadevas [LW1] [RY]

Mahaguru Orgyen Tötreng Tsal (ma ha gu ru o rgyan thod phreng rtsal). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Mahaguru Padma Tötreng Tsal (ma ha gu ru pad ma thod phreng rtsal). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Mahaguru Padmakara (ma ha gu ru pad ma 'byung gnas). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Mahaguru Padmakara. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]

Mahaguru Padmakara; the names of [LWx] [RY]

Mahaguru Padmasambhava. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]

Mahaguru Padmasambhava; [LWx] [RY]

Mahakala - great wrathful tantric deity; wrathful aspect of Avalokiteshvara. [RY]

Mahakalpa (bskal pa chen po). A great aeon during which the entire universe is formed, remains, disintegrates and is void. [RY]

Mahakarunikaya (thugs rje chen po'i sku). The 'embodiment of great compassion,' Avalokiteshvara. [RY]

Mahakarunikaye (Skt.). Together with the 'namo,' it means "Homage to the Great Compassionate One," Avalokiteshvara. [RY]

Mahakashyapa - () The disciple to whom the Buddha entrusted the care of the Sangha; the first of the patriarchs [RY]

Mahakashyapa ('od srung chen po). [ZL] [RY]

Mahakasyapa - The disciple to whom the Buddha entrusted the care of the Sangha; the first of the patriarchs. [Tarthang]

Mahamadyamika (dbu ma chen po). See 'madhyamika.' [RY]

Mahamaya (sgyu ma chen mo); great illusion. A tantra of the anuttara tantra. [Rain of Wisdom]

Mahamudra - (phyag rgya chen po) lit. 'Great Gesture' or 'Great Seal'; all-encompassing, and unchanging; the indivisible unity of the Developing and Perfecting Stage; attainment of Pristine Awareness. [RY]

Mahamudra (phyag chen, phyag rgya chen po). In the context of this book, 'mahamudra' refers to the 'supreme attainment of mahamudra' which is synonymous with complete enlightenment or to the 'vidyadhara level of mahamudra,' the third of the four vidyadhara levels. [ZL] [RY]

Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po) [LW1] [RY]

Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po), the Great Seal, is the main system of practice for recognizing the nature of mind in the Kagyu traditions. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po). In the context of this book, 'mahamudra' either refers to the 'supreme attainment of mahamudra' which is synonymous with complete enlightenment, or to the 'mahamudra form of the yidam deity' mentioned below. [RY]

Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po). Literally, the "great seal," the most direct practice for realizing one's buddha nature. A system of teachings which is the basic view of Vajrayana practice according to the Sarma schools, the New Schools of Kagyu, Gelug, and Sakya. [RY]

Mahamudra (phyag rgya chen po). Literally, the 'great seal,' the most direct practice for realizing one's buddha nature. A system of teachings which is the basic view of Vajrayana practice according to the Sarma or 'new' schools of Kagyü, Gelug, and Sakya. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Mahamudra {phya rgya chen po}. Lit. Great seal. It refers to the seal of the absolute nature on all phenomena. The term is used for mahamudra teaching and practice, and for supreme accomplishment. [RY]

Mahamudra Bindu (phyag chen thig le). A tantric text. [RY]

Mahamudra form of the yidam deity (yi dam lha'i phyag chen kyi lus). The attainment, chiefly through Mahayoga Tantra, of the illusory wisdom body on the vidyadhara level of mahamudra which corresponds to the path of cultivation. It is a divine form of a deity endowed with the complete major and minor marks and through which the yogi is able to benefit beings in an extent that is equal to the sambhogakaya. [RY]

Mahamudra level of the path of cultivation (sgom lam phyag rgya chen po). Same as the vidyadhara level of mahamudra. [ZL] [RY]

Mahamudra of Dispelling the Darkness of Ignorance (phyag chen ma rig mun sel). [EMP] [RY]

Mahamudra of Unconfined Vastness (phyag chen klong yangs mtha' bral). [EMP] [RY]

Mahamudra Prayer (phyag chen smon lam) written by the 3rd Karmapa, Rangjung Dorje (rang 'byung rdo rje, 1284-1339). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mahamudra Teachings of the Gedenpas (dge ldan bka' brgyud rin po che'i phyag chen rtsa ba rgyal ba'i gzhung lam), by Lobzang Chökyi Gyaltsen (blo bzang chos kyi rgyal mtshan), see DZ, vol.4 pp. 489-98. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Mahamudra vidyadhara level. See vidyadhara level [LW1] [RY]

Mahamudra vidyadhara level; [LWx] [RY]

Mahamudra; [LWx] [RY]

Mahanirvana (mya ngan las 'das pa chen po). The state of final buddhahood that dwells neither in samsaric existence nor in the passive nirvana of an arhant. [RY]

Mahanirvana Sutra; quotation from; [LWx] [RY]

mahapandita (great schlar, teacher) [Rain of Wisdom]

Mahaparinirvana Sutra (myang 'das chen po) [LW1] [RY]

Mahasamghika - The great assembly; one of the earliest Buddhist schools, usually contrasted with the Sthavira [RY]

Mahasamghika - The great assembly; one of the earliest Buddhist schools, usually contrasted with the Sthavira. [Tarthang]

Mahasandhi (rdzogs pa chen po). Same as Dzogchen. Literally, 'great perfection,' the most direct practice for realizing one's buddha nature according to the Nyingma, or Old School. [RY]

Mahasandhi (Skt., rdzogs pa chen po). See 'Dzogchen.' [RY]

Mahasandhi. Mahasandhi (Tibetan: rdzogs chen) "The Great Completion" is the highest teaching amongst the early Tantras. [Peter Roberts]

Mahasattva. 'Great Being', standard epithet of Bodhisattvas. [RY]

Mahasiddha (grub chen). 'Great perfected one', realized Tantric practitioner. [RY]

Mahasudarsana - Last of the seven patriarchs; taught extensively in south and east; also known as Sudarsana. [Tarthang]

Mahasudarshana - Last of the seven patriarchs; taught extensively in south and east; also known as Sudarshana [RY]

Mahasukha Natha (dgon po bde ba chen po) [LW1] [RY]

Mahasukha Natha (dgon po bde ba chen po) [LWx] [RY]

Mahasukha Padmasambhava, the Lotus-Born of Great Bliss. See Padmasambhava [LW1] [RY]

Mahasukha Padmasambhava; [LWx] [RY]

Mahasukhakaya (bde ba chen po'i sku). Of the five kayas, the 'body of great bliss.' [RY]

Mahatma (bdag nyid chen po). One of noble nature, exceedingly wise, etc. [RY]

Mahavajra (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

Mahavibhasa - Great compilation of Abhidharma teachings associated with the Third Council; basis of the Vaibhashika school [RY]

Mahavihara - Monastery founded in Sri Lanka bv King Devanampiya Tissa; leading center of the Theravadin tradition. [Tarthang]

Mahavihara - Monastery founded in Sri Lanka by King Devanampiya Tissa; leading center of the Theravadin tradition [RY]

Mahayana - (theg pa chen po) lit. 'Great Vehicle'; the way of those who follow the Bodhisattva ideal, intent on achieving liberation for the purpose of freeing all beings from the misery of samsara. Two paths lead to the realization of the Bodhisattva: the Sutrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras, and the Mantrayana, the way of those who follow the teachings of the Sutras and Tantras. [RY][[

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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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