Chapter XXIX — Approaches (RiBa)

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Chapter XXIX

~Approaches~

What is more, Subhuti, a Bodhisattva approaches the perfection of wisdom as follows: Through non-attachment to any and all dharmas. From the non-differentiatedness of any and all dharmas. From the fact all dharmas cannot possibly come about. In the conviction "any and all dharmas are equal in remaining unaffected by change." One recognizes by innate wisdom as pure buddha-nature, all dharmas as without self, give us no hint [about their true nature or intentions].

In the conviction "any and all talk about dharmas [is extraneous to them], consists in mere words, mere conventional expressions, - but these conventional expressions do not refer to anything real, are not derived from anything real, nor are these conventional expressions anything real." In this conviction "any and all dharmas lie outside conventional expression and discourse, and it is not these which are conventionally expressed or uttered." The Bodhisattva approaches the perfection of wisdom from unlimitedness of any and all dharmas. [476] By penetration into any and all dharmas. From the fact any and all dharmas are perfectly pure in their original nature. From the fact any and all dharmas are beyond words.

Even the different kinds of forsaking are equal [in value and kind], since any and all dharmas can never be stopped. Suchness is everywhere sameness, since any and all dharmas are already realized Nirvana. In this conviction "any and all dharmas do not come, nor do these go; these cannot be generated, these are unborn...this non-birth being absolute." One such as this observes neither oneself nor others. In this conviction "any and all dharmas are holy Arhats, perfectly pure in this original nature." In this conviction "any and all dharmas laid down this burden, as no burden has ever been taken on by these." Such ones approach prefection of wisdom from the fact any and all dharmas have neither place nor locality.

For form, feeling, perception, impulses, and consciousness, are without place and locality, in accordance with the own-being of original nature which is no-being. One is exhilarated by the cessation of any and all dharmas. One feels neither content nor discontent. One is neither impassioned nor dispassionate. For form, etc., in their nature reality, in their own-being, are not either impassioned or dispassioned. In the conviction "the original nature [of any and all dharmas], is perfectly pure." In the conviction, "all dharmas are non-attached, free from both attachment and non-attachment." [477] In the conviction "any and all dharmas are essentially enlightenment, as these are equally understood by Buddha-cognition."

From the Emptiness, Signlessness and Wishlessness of all dharmas. In the cognition "any and all dharmas are essentially a healing medicine, as controlled by friendliness and accord." In the conviction "all dharmas are dwellers in friendliness, dwellers in compassion, dwellers in sympathetic joy, dwellers in impartiality." In the conviction "all dharmas are identified as this supreme universal spirit, as in simply being no faults can arise, as in essential being all faults remain unproduced." In the conviction "all dharmas are equally neither hopeful nor hostile."

One approaches this boundlessness of perfection of wisdom through [the analogy of] boundlessness of the ocean; through [the analogy of] multicolored brilliance of Meru. One approaches boundlessness of perfection of wisdom: from boundlessness of form, feeling, perception, impulses, consciousness; through [analogy of] boundless illumination shed by the circle of the sun's rays; from boundlessness of all sounds; from boundlessness of the final achievement of any and all dharmas of a Buddha; from boundlessness [of the excellence] of the equipment of any worlds of limitless beings with merit and cognition; from boundlessness of element earth; and so from boundlessness of elements water, fire, air, space and consciousness. [478]

One approaches unlimitedness of perfection of wisdom from unlimitedness of the collection of wholesome and unwholesome dharmas; from unlimitedness of the collection of all dharmas.

One approaches boundlessness of perfection of wisdom: through acquisition of boundlessness of concentration on all dharmas; from boundlessness of all Buddha-dharmas; from boundlessness of all dharmas; from boundlessness of emptiness; from boundlessness of thought and constituents; from boundlessness of thoughts and actions.

One approaches measureless perfection of wisdom from measureless wholesome and unwholesome dharmas. One approaches resounding declarations of perfection of wisdom through the [analogy of the] roaring of the lion's roar.

One approaches the fact that perfection of wisdom cannot be shaken by outside factors from the fact that any and all dharmas cannot be shaken by outside factors. For form, etc., is like the ocean. Form, and each skandha, is like firmament; like brilliant and multicolored Meru; like production of the rays of the disk of the sun; boundless like all sounds; boundless like the whole world of beings; boundless like final achievement of the dharmas of a Buddha; boundless like equipment with merit and cognition of all beings in all worlds; [479] this is like earth, like water, fire, air, space and consciousness; this has no definite boundary like collection of all wholesome and unwholesome dharmas; this has no definite boundary like collection of all dharmas. Form is departure [into Buddhahood], the own-being of form is Buddha-dharma which is essentially Suchness of form; etc., to: consciousness is departure [into Buddhahood], the own-being of consciousness is the Buddha-dharma which is essentially Suchness of consciousness.

Form, and each skandha, is boundless true nature of any and all dharmas; Suchness as empty, boundless true nature [of things]; boundlessness of thought and constituents; which merely appears to give rise to thought and action; which is apprehended as wholesome or unwholesome until non-apprehension; it is as the lion's roar; it cannot be shaken by outside factors.

In such ways a Bodhisattva approaches perfect wisdom. [480] As the Bodhisattva approaches perfect wisdom in this way, apperceives this, enters into this, understands this, reflects on this, examines, investigates, and develops this, -with acts of mind which abandon any and all deception and deceit, any and all conceit, any exaltation of self, any and all laziness, any deprecation of others, notion of self, any notion of a being, gain, honor and fame, the five hindrances, envy and meanness, and any and all vacillation, - so this is not hard for one to gain full perfection of all virtues, of the Buddha-field and of supreme dharmas of a Buddha.


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