rang bzhin gsum

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the three natures. 1) kun brtags - imputations. 2) gzhan dbang - dependent phenomena, 3) yongs grub - thoroughly established phenomena; Three Natural Categories. Three essential characteristics of the imaginary, dependent and absolute. the three natures. 1) kun brtags imputations, mentally fabricated - parikalpita. 2) gzhan dbang dependent phenomena, relative / dependency nature - paratantra, 3) yongs grub thoroughly established phenomena, ideally absolute - parinispanna; three natural expressions. the three essential categories. Three Natural Categories. Three essential characteristics of the imaginary, dependent and absolute. the three natures. 1) kun brtags mentally fabricated - parikalpita, 2) gzhan dbang relative / dependency nature - paratantra, 3) yongs grub ideally absolute - parinispanna [RY]

the three natures [IW]

the three natures [1) kun brtags - imputations, 2) gzhan dbang - dependent phenomena, 3) yongs grub - thoroughly established phenomena - three natural expressions the three essential categories Book 1, p - three natural categories three essential characteristics of the imaginary, dependent and absolute see studies of the lank vat ra by dt suzuki, p 154-163 - the three natures 1) [[kun brtags mentally fabricated - parikalpita, 2) gzhan dbang relative/dependency nature - paratantra, 3) [[yongs grub - ideally absolute - parinispanna [IW]

Three natures (mtshan nyid gsum). The aspects of phenomena as set forth by the Chittamatra and Yogachara schools: the 'imagined,' the 'dependent,' and the 'absolute.' The imagined (kun brtags) is the two kinds of self-entity. The dependent (gzhan dbang) is the eight collections of consciousness. The absolute (yongs grub) is the empty nature of things, suchness [RY]