pha rol tu phyin pa

From Rangjung Yeshe Wiki - Dharma Dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This is the RYI Dictionary content as presented on the site http://rywiki.tsadra.org/, which is being changed fundamentally and will become hard to use within the GoldenDict application. If you are using GoldenDict, please either download and import the rydic2003 file from DigitalTibetan.

Or go directly to http://rywiki.tsadra.org/ for more upcoming features.

ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པ
Paramita. Literally, 'paramita' means 'reaching the other shore.' Particularly, it means transcending concepts of subject, object and action [RY]

1) go to the other side/ paramita, end, "gone across", "gone to the other shore", perfection, transcendental/ transcending (action/ virtue ways of overcoming (limitations [IW]

true consummation; usu. perfection [RB]

paramita [JV]

paramita, "gone across", "gone to the other shore", perfection, transcendental / transcendent / transcending [action / virtue]. transcendent perfection [RY]

paramita. Literally, 'paramita' means 'reaching the other shore.' Particularly, it means transcending concepts of subject, object and action. The Paramita vehicle (phar phyin gyi theg pa) is the Mahayana system of the gradual path through the five paths and ten bhumis according to the Prajnaparamita scriptures. See also 'six paramitas.' [RY]

Skt. pāramitā. 1) transcendental practice, transcendental perfection, transcendent practice, transcendent perfection; 2) far-reaching practice, far-reaching perfection; 3) wide-ranging practice, wide-ranging perfection; 4) consummate practice, consummate perfection. "Perfection", despite being the most common English rendering of this term, is quite flawed. These in fact usually refer to the ongoing, unperfected cultivated applications of those who practice the bodhisattva path. The core meaning is 'transcendent(-al)', as these are not the ordinary kinds of generosity, patience and so on, but rather those practices which are made 'transcendental' (or "perfected") by way of the bodhisattva's bodhicitta (byang chub kyi sems) and view of emptiness (stong pa nyid); in particular through the sixth pāramitā, the Transcendental Practice of Discerning Insight or prajñā-pāramitā. [Erick Tsiknopoulos]