Obscuration

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Obscuration [RY]

sgrib pa - Obscuration. The two veils of disturbing emotions and dualistic perception that cover one's buddha nature [RY]

sgrib pa - Obscurations. The veils that covers one's direct perception of the nature of mind. In the general Buddhist teachings several types are mentions: the obscuration of karma preventing one from entering the path of enlightenment, the obscuration of disturbing emotions preventing progress along the path, the obscuration of habitual tendencies preventing the vanishing of confusion, and the final obscuration of dualistic knowledge preventing the full attainment of buddhahood [RY]

sgrib pa gsum - Three Obscurations. The obscurations of the knowable, of conflicting emotions and of propensities. 1) {rnam smin gyi sgrib pa}. 2) {las kyi sgrib pa} 3) {nyon mongs pa'i sgrib pa} the three obscurations, the three veils [RY]

nyon mongs pa'i sgrib pa - Obscuration of disturbing emotions. The emotions of the five poisons: anger, desire, stupidity, pride and envy [RY]

bag chag gyi sgrib pa - Obscuration of habitual tendencies. The propensity for apprehending attributes occurring in the mind of even highly developed bodhisattvas [RY]

Obscuration (sgrib pa). The two veils of disturbing emotions and dualistic knowledge that cover one's buddha nature. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Obscuration (sgrib pa). The two veils of disturbing emotions and dualistic perception that cover one's buddha nature. [RY]

obscuration (sgrib pa); four types; of disturbing emotions; of mental fabrications; temporary [LW1] [RY]

Obscuration of conceptual knowledge (shes bya'i sgrib pa). The subtle obscuration of holding on to the concepts of subject, object and action. [RY]

Obscuration of disturbing emotions (nyon mongs pa'i sgrib pa). The emotions of the five poisons: anger, desire, stupidity, pride and envy. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

obscuration of disturbing emotions [LWx] [RY]

Obscuration of dualistic knowledge (shes bya'i sgrib pa). The subtle obscuration of holding on to the concepts of subject, object and action. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Obscuration of habitual tendencies (bag chag gyi sgrib pa). The propensity for apprehending attributes occurring in the mind of even highly developed bodhisattvas. [RY]

obscuration of transference (pho ba) [LW1] [RY]

obscuration of transference ('pho sgrib); expl. [LWx] [RY]

obscuration of union (snyoms 'jug gi sgrib pa) [LW1] [RY]

obscuration of union; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Obscuration Wands of thousand Gods and Demons (lha 'dre stong gi sgrib shing srung ba). [ZL] [RY]

Obscurations (sgrib pa). The veils that covers one's direct perception of the nature of mind. In the general Buddhist teachings several types are mentions: the obscuration of karma preventing one from entering the path of enlightenment, the obscuration of disturbing emotions preventing progress along the path, the obscuration of habitual tendencies preventing the vanishing of confusion, and the final obscuration of dualistic knowledge preventing the full attainment of buddhahood. [RY]

Obscurations, the two (avarana, sgrib (pa)). Those of defilements (klesha) and of knowables (jnyeya). [RY]

Obscuring emotions (Skt. klesa, Tib. nyon mongs), the eighty-four thousand kinds of confusions that obscure the mind, prevent the realization of the lack of existence of individual self, or ego, and of phenomena, and thus perpetuate suffering in samsara. They can be condensed into five: anger, desire, ignorance, pride, and jealousy, which are often called the "five poisons." [MR-ShabkarNotes]