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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Ja O Kyilbar. [RY]

Jahabira - The teachings on prana of the Indian mahasiddha Jahabira are instructions on the vital energies (rlung) and on taking the essence of the elements (rasayana or bcud len); through them one can ultimately transform one's ordinary physical aggregates into a rainbow body ('ja' lus). These instructions, gathered by Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo, can be found in volume 30, (A) of RT, p. 311-564, and in the Compendium of Sadhanas (sgrub thabs kun btus, Vol. 11). Instructions on these teachings are also found in the termas of Garwang Dorje (gar dbang rdo rje, 1640-85). A disciple of the mahasiddha Mahanatha (who was considered to be an emanation of Guru Padmasambhava), Jahabira himself had hundreds of disciples, among whom, in Tibet, were Manikanatha and Nesar Jamyang Khyentse Wangchuk (gnas gsar 'jam dbyangs mkhyen brtse dbang phyug, 1524-1568). Jahabira eventually attained the rainbow body. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jain ascetics (gcer bu pa) [LWx] [RY]

Jaina [LW1] [RY]

Jaina [LWx] [RY]

Jalandhara (Skt.). [ZL] [RY]

'jam dpal bshes gnyen - WO1 258 life story [RY]

Jambu Continent ('dzam bu gling) [LW1] [RY]

Jambu Continent ('dzam bu gling). Our known world. The southern of the four continents, so called because it is adorned with the Jambubriksha (rose apple) tree. [ZL] [RY]

Jambu Continent ('dzam bu gling). Our known world. The southernmost of the four continents, in classical Buddhist cosmology, so called because it is adorned with the jambubriksha (rose apple) tree. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Jambu Continent ('dzam bu gling);; expl. [LWx] [RY]

Jambu Continent (T: dzam bu gling) The southern continent or island of the Buddhist world-system named after the jambu (rose-apple) tree. The entire known world was regarded as Jambu Continent. Since the buddha dharma is taught there, it is an auspicious place. [Rain of Wisdom]

Jambu Continent [LWx] [RY]

Jambu Riksha/Briksha, the Rose-apple Tree (Eugenia jambolana), is a legendary tree which grew on the banks of the "Ever Cool Lake," (ma dros mtsho) Anavatapta or Manasarovar. Its fruit falling into the lake made a sound like "jambu!" This gave the name Jambudvipa to the southern continent. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jambu River ('dzam bu chu bo). a mythical river formed by the juice of the fruits of the immense jambu tree (rose apple tree, Eugenia jambolana) growing on Mount Meru, with golden sand. [RY]

Jambubriksha [LW1] [RY]

Jambudvipa ('dzam (bu) gling). The Southern Continent of Indian mythical geography, often identified with the Indian subcontinent; but from the point of view of the characteristics of its human inhabitants, all this Earth is classed as Jambudvipa. I have usually translated it as 'India' or 'our world' according to the context. [RY]

Jambudvipa ('dzam bu gling). Our known world. The southern of the four continents, so called because it is adorned with the Jambubriksha tree. [RY]

Jambudvipa (dzam bu gling). The continent situated to the south of Mount Sumeru, the center of the world in Buddhist cosmology. [RY]

Jamdrak Rinpoche. See Jamyang Drakpa [LW1] [RY]

Jamdrak Rinpoche; see Jamyang Drakpa [LWx] [RY]

Jamdrak. See Jamyang Drakpa [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül (1813-1899) Also known as Lodrö Thaye and by his tertön name Chimey Yungdrung Lingpa. He was at the forefront of the Rimey movement in the 19th century. Renowned as an accomplished master, scholar and writer, he authored more than 100 volumes of scriptures. The most well known are his Five Treasuries, among which are the 63 volumes of the Rinchen Terdzö, the terma literature of the one hundred great tertöns. [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul). (1813-1899). Also known as Lodrö Thaye, Yönten Gyamtso, Padma Garwang and by his tertön name Padma Tennyi Yungdrung Lingpa. He was one of the most prominent Buddhist masters in the 19th century and placed special focus upon a non-sectarian attitude. Renowned as an accomplished master, scholar and writer, he authored more than 100 volumes of scriptures. The most well known are his Five Treasuries, among which are the 63 volumes of the Rinchen Terdzö, the terma literature of the one hundred great tertöns. [ZL] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul). (1813-1899). Also known as Lodrö Thaye, Yönten Gyamtso, Padma Garwang and by his tertön name Padma Tennyi Yungdrung Lingpa. He was one of the most prominent Buddhist masters in the 19th century and placed special focus upon a non-sectarian attitude. Renowned as an accomplished master, scholar and writer, he authored more than 100 volumes of scriptures. The most well known are his Five Treasuries, among which are the 63 volumes of the Rinchen Terdzö, the terma literature of the one hundred great tertöns. [AL] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul); biographical details; Chimey Tennyi Yungdrung Lingpa; details of; Jamgön Rinpoche; on Mahayoga; Padma Garwang; Tennyi Yungdrung Lingpa; Yönten Gyatso [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül ('jam mgon kong sprul); details of; [LWx] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Thaye ('jam mgon kong sprul lo gros mtha' yas). See Jamgön Kongtrül [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Thaye; biographical details; [LWx] [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül the First (byams mgon kong sprul). A great nonsectarian master of the nineteenth century and author of more than one hundred volumes of books. [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül the Great. See Jamgön Kongtrül [LW1] [RY]

Jamgon Kongtrul was anticipated by the Buddha in the King of Samadhi Sutra: “I foretell the one called Lodrö Thaye in whose hand lies the eminent samadhi, and who with boundless renown like Maitreya, will act for the welfare of all beings.” [RY]

Jamgön Kongtrül; [LWx] [RY]

Jamgön Lama ('jam mgon bla ma). In this case the name refers to Mipham Rinpoche. [RY]

Jamgön Lama Rinpoche ('jam mgon bla ma rin po che). See Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Lama Rinpoche; alias Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; [LWx] [RY]

Jamgön Palden Khyentse Öser, Karsey Kongtrül (kar sras kong sprul) [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Palden Khyentse Öser. See Karsey Kongtrül [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Rinpoche ('jam mgon rin po che). See Jamgön Kongtrül [LW1] [RY]

Jamgön Rinpoche; see Jamgön Kongtrül; [LWx] [RY]

Jampa Bumling (byams pa bum gling), the Abode of One Hundred Thousand Maitreyas, which shelered a huge Maitreya statue (said to be 80 meters high), and one hundred thousand smaller molded images of Maitreya. It was founded by Gyalwa Sonam Gyatso. Some say that the large Maitreya statue was erected by the Chinese Princess Wengchen, on her way to Lhasa to wed King Songtsen Gampo, some say that it was a Bönpo statue of Tönpa Shenrap (ston pa gshen rab), which has been turned into a Buddhist image. See AC, Vol.I, pp.311-7. See AC, Vol.I, pp.311-7. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jampal Shenyen ('jam dpal bshes gnyen). A great Indian pandita who became the chief disciple of Garab Dorje. His sanskrit name is Manjushrimitra. [RY]

Jampaling (byams pa gling), a large Gelukpa monastic estate on which stood, before its annihilation by the Chinese, the Great Stupa of the Thousand Images of Maitreya, built by Jampa Lingpa Sonam Namgyal ('byams pa gling pa bsod nams rnam rgyal, 1401-1475). It was an immense stupa, perhaps the largest in Tibet (with Chung Riwoche), sheltering temples inside at each level. In the ground floor temple was an image of Maitreya fifty meters high. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jampaling; (byams pa gling), the Great Kumbum. A very vast Gelukpa monastic estate, when standed (before its total anihilation by the Chinese) the Great Stupa of the Thousand Images of Maitreya build by Jampalingpa Sönam Namgyel (1401-1475). It was an immense stupa with temples inside at each level. In the ground floor temple was a giant 50 m high image of Maitreya. [MR]

Jampel Gyatso ('jam dpal rgya mtsho, 1356-1428); Basowa Chökyi Gyaltsen (ba so ba chos kyi rgyal mtshan, 1409-73); Drupchen Chökyi Dorje (grub chen chos kyi rdo rje, fifteenth century); and Gyalwa Wensapa Lobzang Dondrup (rgyal ba dben sa pa blo bzang don grub, 1504-66). These are four of the "six siddhas of the Ganden Mahamudra." See Willis (1985). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jampudvipa {'dzam bu gling}. The southern continent which is one of the four main continents according to ancient Indian cosmology. It is the world in which we live. [RY]

Jamyang Chöje, (founder of Drepung):1379-1449 [MR]

Jamyang Döny" Gyaltsen: 1310-1344 (2nd son of Sangpo Pal's 6th spouse) [MR]

Jamyang Drakpa ('jam dbyangs grags pa), biographical details by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, Jamdrak Rinpoche [LW1] [RY]

Jamyang Drakpa; biographical details by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche; [LWx] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö [LWx] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö. See Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö [LW1] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo ('jam dbyangs mkhyen brtse'i dbang po). (1820-1892) A great master of the last century and close friend, guru and disciple of Chokgyur Lingpa. [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo ('jam dbyangs mkhyen brtse'i dbang po). (1820-1892). A great master of the last century. He was the last of the Five Great Tertöns and was regarded as the combined reincarnation of Vimalamitra and King Trisong Deutsen. He became the master and teacher of all the Buddhist schools of Tibet and the founder of the Rimey movement. There are ten volumes of his works in addition to his termas. Jamyang means 'Manjushri, gentle melodiousness,' Khyentse Wangpo means 'Lord of loving wisdom.'[AL] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo ('jam dbyangs mkhyen brtse'i dbang po); decoding the Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo; description by Jamgön Kongtrül; Do-ngak Lingpa; Dorje Ziji; Dorje Ziji Tsal; first teacher of Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo; Jamgön Lama Rinpoche; Padma Ösel Do-ngak Lingpa; Shabdrung Rinpoche; short biography; terma teachings of; tertön name [LW1] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo ('jam dbyangs mkhyen brtse'i dbang po, 1820-1892). A great master of the last century. He was the last of the Five Great Tertöns and was regarded as the combined reincarnation of Vimalamitra and King Trisong Deutsen. He became the master and teacher of all the Buddhist schools of Tibet and the founder of the Rimey movement. There are ten volumes of his works in addition to his termas. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo: 1820-1892 [MR]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; decoding the Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo; description by Jamgön Kongtrül; first teacher of Lamrim Yeshe Nyingpo; short biography; terma teachings of; tertön name [LWx] [RY]

Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo; Do-ngak Lingpa [LW1] [RY]

Jamyang Loter Wangpo: 1847-1914 [MR]

Jamyang Shar - Eastern Jamyang ('jam dbyangs shar) is the name of a large mansion near the Jokhang in Lhasa. It was founded in the fifteenth century by Desi Rinpungpa (sde srid rin spungs pa). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jamyang Shepa ('Jam dbyangs bzhad pa nga dbang btson 'drus), founder of Lhabrang Tahsikhyil: [MR]

Jamyang Shepa II, Konchog Jigme Wangpo (dkon mchog 'jigs med dbang po): 1728-1791 [MR]

Jamyang Shepa Losel Jigme Gyatso, The third(blo gsal 'jigs med rgya mtsho, 1796-1855) also known as Lobzang Yignyen Thubten Gyatso (blo bzang dbyig gnyen thub bstan rgya mtsho). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jamyang Shepa Ngawang Tsondru ('jam dbyangs bzhad pa ngag dbang brtson 'grus, 1648-1722). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jamyang Shepa, the 3rd (blo bzang dbyig gnyen thub bstan rgya mtsho, 1796-1855). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jangchub Shönnu of Tsangsar (tshang gsar byang chun gzhon nu). One of the masters in the Barom Kagyü lineage. [RY]

Jangter Gongpa Sangtal. See 'Openness of Realization Tantra.' [RY]

Jarung Kashor - This refers to the story of the poultry woman Shamvara who built the stupa of Jarung Kashor (bya rung kha shor), the present Bodhnath. When she was dying, she enjoined the four sons she had by four different fathers to complete her work. By the merit of her deeds, she attained Buddhahood and manifested as the protectress Pramoha Devi. At the completion of the work, each of those who contributed to it made an aspiration-prayer. In accordance with their vows, the first son became the Abbot, Santarakshita, the second one became the Master, Guru Padmasambhava, the third one became the Dharma King, Trisong Detsen, and the fourth one became the wise minister Bami Trihzi (zhang blon rba mi krhi gzigs), a Buddhist minister of King Trisong Detsen. The ox who had carried earth and stones did not know how to pray and, feeling that his hard work had been forgotten, made the perverse wish to harm the work of the four sons. He became King Langdharma, who attempted to eradicate Buddhism from Tibet, but failed to do so; he was eventually assassinated by Lhalung Palkyi Dorje, himself the rebirth of a crow who had heard the ox make his wicked vow, and had made a wish to be reborn as a Bodhisattva who would assassinate the apostate king. The text of the history of the Jarung Khashor (mchod rten chen po bya rung kha shor gyi lo rgyus thos pas grol ba), is a terma revealed at Samye around the eleventh century by Lhatsun Ngonmo (lha btsun sngon mo) who hid it again because the time for its dissemination was not ripe. It was rediscovered again (yang gter) probably in 1512 (see GC vol.3, p.50) by Ngakchang Sakya Zangpo (sngags 'chang shakya bzang po), who wrote it in its present form. See K. Dowman, The Legend of the Great Stupa (1973) and Franz-Karl Ehrhard (1990 and 1991). Keith Dowman communicated to us the following summary of the conventional history of the Great Stupa: "Both Newari and Tibetan legend place the foundation of The Great Stupa of Bodhnath in antiquity. The Newars believe that the Licchavi king Manadeva (died A.D.505) built the original stupa as a reliquary for his father, King Vrsadeva, after he had unwittingly killed him. The Tibetan legend implies only that the stupa was built before Trisong Detsen invited Guru Padmasambhava to Tibet in the eighth century. A thirteenth-century Tibetan biography of Padmasambhava (Padma bka' thang shel brag ma) provides the first literary reference to the stupa and establishes the earliest Tibetan connection with it. There is no further substantial information concerning Bodhnath until the early sixteenth century, when Sakya Zangpo, a Nyingmapa yogin from Kham, had a vision at Samye, in central Tibet, that induced him to travel to Bodhnath to restore the stupa. However, upon arrival, he had difficulty in identifying the mound of earth that once had been the stupa. Having found the right location, Sakya Zangpo unearthed the Stupa and restored it. It is Sakya Zangpo's sixteenth-century reconstruction that is still extant, although its form has been modified. Sakya Zangpo established a line of incarnate lamas in Yolmo (Helambu) who were the caretaker abbots of the stupa. Thereafter the community of Buddhist Tamangs thrived around the stupa, which also became the principal destination for Tibetan pilgrims outside Tibet. In 1855 the abbacy of Bodhnath was given to a Chinese pilgrim, a Nyingma yogin, who gave service as interpreter to Jung Bahadur during the peace talks following the Nepali-Chinese war. Under the second and third chini Lamas, who also were the Dalai Lama's consuls in Nepal, the abbacy of Bodhnath extended both its spiritual and temporal power. Since the death in 1982 of the last traditional abbot of Bodhnath, the third chini Lama, much of the spiritual authority has devolved upon the Tibetan lamas who have built monasteries in the vicinity of the stupa." [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jarung Khashor (bya rung kha shor), the Great Stupa of Bodhnath in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal. On its history see chap.12, note 23. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jarung Khashor (bya rung kha shor). 'Permission Once Given (Cannot be Taken Back)'. The great white stupa at Boudhanath in the Kathmandu Valley. [ZL] [RY]

Jarung Khashor. [RY]

Jatshon Nyingpo: 1585-1656 [MR]

Jayavarman VII - Thirteenth century Cambodian king who gave strong support to the Dharma [RY]

Je Dharma Rinchen (dhar ma rin chen): 1364-1432 [MR]

Jedren. [RY]

Jedrung Trinley Jampa Jungney:1856-192? [MR]

Jeta Grove at Sravasti where the Buddha and his disciples spent their yearly rainy-season retreat (dbyar gnas)f or nineteen years. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Jeta Grove. A Grove near Shravasti in India, originally owned by Prince Jeta and donated to Shakyamuni Buddha. Side of a monastery, frequently the location of Dharma preachings by the Buddha. [RY]

Jetavana - Grove donated to the Sangha by the Buddha's lay disciple Anathapindaka; also a monastery founded in fourth century in Sri Lanka [RY]

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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

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--Richard 12:43, 12 August 2008 (EDT)