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The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Net of Thousand Gods and Demons (lha 'dre stong gi drva ba). Name of tantric scripture. [ZL] [RY]

Netang Drolma Lhakang; (sgrol ma lha khang) Netang Drolma Lhakang was the main residence of Jowo Atisha in Tibet, and the place where he died in 1054. One finds there a statue of Atisha, regarded as is own likeness, some bone-relics of Atisha and his dharma robes. [MR]

Neten [LW1] [RY]

Neten Chokling [LW1] [RY]

Neten Chokling Rinpoche was born in Bhutan and recognized as the forth reincarnation of the great tertön Chogyur Lingpa by His Holiness the 16th Karmapa and His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche. He was brought to the Chokling monastery in Bir, India at the age of three. Rinpoche was able to recognize everyone and everything from his previous life. Chogyur Lingpa lived in the early part of the 19th century and was one the most renowned treasure revealers. His termas have been and continue to be practiced widely in both the Nyingma and Kagyu schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Chokling Rinpoche still lives in his monestary in Bir, looking after its well being and caring for the monks. His root teachers are His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche and Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche. He is known amongst his peers as one of the most humorous, gentle and spacious teachers, indicating the great depth of his inner realization. [RY]

Neten Chokling. [RY]

Neten Chokling; [LWx] [RY]

Neten Gompa [LW1] [RY]

Neten Monastery. [RY]

Neten. [RY]

Neudong Dzong; (sne'u gdong rdzong). The site of the palace from which the Phagmodrupa family ruled Tibet during the 14th and 15th centuries. [MR]

Neudong Tse Tsokpa; (sne'u gdong rtse tshog pa) A Sakya monastery (now totally destroyed by the Chinese) situated at the foot of Neudong Dzong. It was founded by the Kasmiri Pandita Sakyashri (1145-1243). The temple sheltered a precious image of Sakyashri who talked as a person on several accasions. [MR]

never-ending adornment wheels (mi zad rgyan 'khor); of body, speech, mind, qualities, and activities; See also 'five never-ending adornment wheels' [LW1] [RY]

never-ending adornment wheels (mi zad rgyan 'khor); of Body, Speech, Mind, Qualities and Activities; of Body, Speech, Mind, Qualities and Activities (sku gsung thugs yon tan phrin las mi zad pa rgyan gyi 'khor lo); see also 'five never-ending adornment wheels'; [Lwx] [RY]

never-ending adornment wheels of Body, Speech, Mind, Qualities and Activities; of Body, Speech, Mind, Qualities and Activities (sku gsung thugs yon tan phrin las mi zad pa rgyan gyi 'khor lo) [RY]

New and Old Schools (gsar rnying). The New Schools are Kagyu, Sakya, and Gelug. The Old School refers to Nyingma. [RY]

New and Old Schools of the Secret Mantra (gsang sngags gsar rnying). See New and Old Schools. [RY]

New Schools (gsar ma). The New Schools are Kagyu, Sakya, and Gelug. [RY]

New Schools (gsar ma); chief tantra of; first masters; systems of explanation [LW1] [RY]

New schools {gsar ma}. Also called New Tradition. All the schools of Tibetan Buddhisn except for the Nyingmapa from the time of the great translator Rinchen Zangpo (957-1055) onwards. [RY]

New Schools of Later Translations (phyi 'gyur gsar ma) [LW1] [RY]

New Schools of Later Translations (phyi 'gyur gsar ma). [RY]

New Schools of Later Translations (phyi 'gyur gsar ma); expl. [LWx] [RY]

New Schools of Secret Mantra (sngags gsar ma) [LW1] [RY]

New Schools of Secret Mantra; first masters; systems of explanation [LWx] [RY]

New Schools; chief tantra of [LWx] [RY]

New Treasures (gter gsar) [LW1] [RY]

New Treasures; mention of [LWx] [RY]

Neykyi Sintig (gnad kyi zin tig). Scripture on Mahamudra. [RY]

Ngadag Nyang (mnga' bdag nyang) / (myang). See Nyang Ral Nyima Özer. [ZL] [RY]

Ngagyur Shechen Tennyi Dargye Ling (snga 'gyur zhe chen bstan gnyis dar rgyas gling). The seat of His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse in Nepal, situated at the Great Stupa of Jarung Khashor in Boudhanath. [ZL] [RY]

Ngakchang Dorje Namgyal (sngags 'chang rdo rje rnam rgyal), was the second incarnation of Tsodu Khenchen Lobzang Trinley ('tsho 'du'i mkhan chen blo bzang phrin las). According to RO, p.555, he had several sons, of whom Shabkar was one. Further incarnations of Lobzang Trinley were recognized. Tsodu (tsho 'du) is one of the five grasslands of the nomad area of Rekong (rong 'brog tsho lnga, see RO, p.560). The name of a Dorje Namgyal also appears in the lineage of the Mindroling tradition which Shabkar received from his Dzogchen master Jampel Dorje ('jam dpal rdo rje). See page ***36* of this autobiography. On Shabkar's lineage for the Khandro Nyingthig, see Appendix 2, table 2, and F.K. Ehrhard, Fluegelschlaege des Garuda, p.37. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

ngakpa (sngags pa) [LW1] [RY]

Ngakpa (sngags pa). See Tantrika. [ZL] [RY]

Ngakpa (Tib. sngags pa, Skt. mantrin) is a practitioner of the Secret Mantrayana. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngakso (sngags gso) [LW1] [RY]

Ngakso; expl.; [LWx] [RY]

Ngaktra Tulku, which should be written sngags grwa sprul sku, means "the Tulku of the Tantric College," and refers to one of the six monastic communities of Sang-ngak Chöling. (Communicated by Sengtrak Rinpoche. See also G.Smith, 1968). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngaktrin Lama (ngag phrin bla ma). The former life of Samten Gyatso. [RY]

Ngamlok (rngam log). A tantra of Mahayoga. [RY]

Ngangchungma (ngang chung ma). The queen of Mutig Tseypo. [ZL] [RY]

Ngari (mnga' ris), details of places in [LW1] [RY]

Ngari Dzong (mnga' ris rdzong) is Dzongka (rdzong kha), which, according to Trulshik Rinpoche should be spelled rdzong dga'. See also Aufschnaiter, 1976, hereafter referred to as MI. Dzongka is the main village in Gungthang (gung thang). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngari Panchen [LW1] [RY]

Ngari Panchen Pema Wangyal; 1487-1542, (mnga' ris pan chen pad ma dbang rgyal), one of the five tertön emanations of King Trisong Deutsen. He was also the author of the famed Domsum Namnge (sdom gsum rnam nges) which explains the three vows of the Pratimoksa, the Bodhisattva, and the Secret Mantra, and how they interrelate. [MR]

Ngari Panchen; quotation by [LWx] [RY]

Ngari Penchen: 1487-1542 [MR]

Ngari Traksang; (mnga' ri grwa tshang) A large Gelukpa monastery built in 1541 under the auspices of the Second Dalai Lama Gedun Gyatso. It stands like a fortress on an eminence dominating the entrance of the Yon Valley. [MR]

Ngari Tratsang (mnga' ris grwa tshang) is a large Gelukpa monastery founded in 1541 under the auspices of the second Dalai Lama, Gedun Gyatso (dge 'dun rgya mtsho, 1475-1542) under the patronage of a king of Guge in Ngari, hence the name of the monastery (see Ferrari, 1958, p.120, n.193). It stands like a fortress on an eminence dominating the entrance to the Yon Valley. See also PP *. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngari; details of places in [LWx] [RY]

Ngawang Chökyi Drakpa. [RY]

Ngawang Jampel Tsultrim (tshe smon gling ngag dbang 'jam dpal tshul khrims), The regent-king from Tsemön Ling in Lhasa (commonly pronounced "Tsomonling"), who ruled from 1819 to 1844. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngawang Lekdrup: 1811- [MR]

Ngawang Lobzang Tendzin (ngag dbang blo bzang bstan 'dzin, 1745-1812), born in Dzogeh (mdzod dge) district in Amdo as a descendent of a highly realized Nyingmapa siddha from Kathok, Ngakchang Dorje Senge (sngags 'chang rdo rje seng ge). He went to central Tibet where, at Mindroling Monastery, he received from Khenchen Orgyen Tendzin (mkhan chen o rgyan bstan 'dzin, b. 1742) the empowerments of the Mindroling tradition, which he conferred here upon Shabkar. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngawang Namgyal / (ngag dbang rnam rgyal) - Seventeenth century bKa' brgyud pa lama who became Dharma king of Bhutan [RY]

Ngawang Nyentrak (ngag dbang snyan grags), the sixty-sixth throne-holder of Ganden. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngawang Tenzing Norbu 1867- [MR]

Ngayab Lingpa (rnga yab gling pa). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Ngayab Palri. [RY]

Ngedon Drubpey Dorje. [RY]

Ngedon Gatsal Ling. [RY]

Ngedön Tenzin Sangpo (nges don bstan 'dzin bzang po): 1759-1792 [MR]

Ngodrup Palbar. [RY]

Ngog Lotsawa Lodrö Sherab: 1059-1109 [MR]

Ngöndro (sngon 'gro). See 'preliminaries.' [Primer] [RY]

Ngöndro (sngon 'gro). See 'preliminaries.' [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Ngondro (sngon 'gro): the preliminary practices of the Mantrayana. For a detail exposition of the Ngondro practice according to the Nyingma tradition, see Patrul Rinpoche's kun bzang bla ma'i zhal lung, translated by Bruyat et al. (1987 and 1994). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngondsok Gyalpo (mngon rdzogs rgyal po). A wrathful manifestation of Samantabhadra. [RY]

Ngor Ewam Chöden (ngor e wam chos ldan) is the second most important monastery of the Sakya school, it was founded in 1429 by Ngorchen Kunga Zangpo (ngor chen kun dga' bzang po, 1382-1444). It became famous for being the seat of the Lamdre teachings, and sheltered a rich library that included a large collection of Sanskrit manuscripts. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Ngor Ewam Chöden; (ngor evam chos ldan) The second most important monastery of the Sakya school was founded in 1429 by Ngorchen Kunga Sangpo (1382-1444). It became famous for being the seat of the Lamdre teachings, and sheltered a rich library which included a large collection of Sanskrit manuscripts. [MR]

Ngorchen Kunga Zangpo: 1382-1457 /44? founded Ngor Monastery [MR]

Ngotön Chökyi Dorje (rngog ston chos kyi rdo rje): 1036-1106 [MR]

Ngulchu [LW1] [RY]

Nichiren - Thirteenth century founder of the Japanese school that bears his name, stressing Lotus Sutra and nationalism [RY]

Niguma (ni gu ma). A great female Indian master and one of the teachers of Khyungpo Naljor. [RY]

Nihilism (chad lta). Literally, 'the view of discontinuance.' The extreme view of nothingness: no rebirth or karmic effects, and the nonexistence of a mind after death. [RY]

Nihilism (chad lta). Literally, 'the view of discontinuance.' The extreme view of nothingness: no rebirth or karmic effects, and the nonexistence of a mind after death.[AL] [RY]

Nihilists [LWx] [RY]

Nikaya - Name for the five divisions of the Suttapitaka of the Pali Canon; some other schools had four nikayas [RY]

Nikaya - Name for the five divisions of the Suttapitaka of the Pali Canon; some other schools had four nikayas. [Tarthang]

Nimba (nim pa). A tree with bitter fruit, Azadirachta indica. Every part of it is used for magical purposes. [RY]

nine actions of the three doors (bya ba dgu phrugs). The outer, inner, and secret activities of body, speech, and mind, which a yogin will give up when engaging in Thögal practice. Three concern the body: 1) outwardly, all worldly, distracting activities, 2) inwardly, all ordinary virtuous deeds such as prostrations and circumambulations, and 3) secretly, all unnecessary movements that scatter one's practice. Three concern speech: 1) outwardly, all worldly, deluded conversations, 2) inwardly, all liturgies and recitations, and 3) secretly, any talking whatsoever. Three concern the mind: 1) outwardly, all worldly, deluded thoughts, 2) inwardly, all mental activity focused on visualizations of the development and the completion stages, and 3) secretly, all movements of the mind. (See Jamgön Kongtrul's snying thig ma bu'i khrid yig, in DZ, vol. Kha, pp. 196-97). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

nine actions of the three doors (bya ba dgu phrugs): all outer, inner, and secret activities of body, speech, and mind, which a yogin will give up when engaging in Thögal practice. Three concern the body: 1) outwardly, all worldly, distracting activities, 2) inwardly, all ordinary virtuous deeds such as prostrations and circumambulations, and 3) secretly, all unnecessary movements that scatter one's practice. Three concern speech: 1) outwardly, all worldly, deluded conversations, 2) inwardly, all liturgies and recitations, and 3) secretly, any talking whatsoever. Three concern the mind: 1) outwardly, all worldly, deluded thoughts, 2) inwardly, all mental activity focused on visualizations of the development and the completion stages, and 3) secretly, all movements of the mind. (See Jamgön Kongtrul's snying thig ma bu'i khrid yig, in DZ, vol Kha, pp. 196-7). [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Nine attributes of a learned person (mkhas pa'i tshul dgu). Being learned, virtuous, and noble; being skilled in exposition, debate, and composition; possessing the three qualities of study, practice, and activity for the benefits of others. [RY]

Nine Categories of Excellence (bzang po'i tshul dgu). Being learned, virtuous, and noble; being skilled in exposition, debate, and composition; possessing the three qualities of study, practice, and activity for the benefits and others. [RY]

nine considerations (brtags pa dgu) [LW1] [RY]

nine considerations (brtags pa rnam pa dgu) [LW1] [RY]

Nine Crescents (zla gam dgu pa). [ZL] [RY]

Nine Cycles of the Bodyless Dakinis; (lus med mkha' 'gro skor dgu): Which were received by Tilopa from the wisdom Dakinis at the Gondhala Temple. These teachings were then transmitted to Naropa, and then partially to Marpa, Milarepa and their followers. Later when Rechungpa went to India he received and brought back to Tibet the entire cycle, which henceforth became part of Rechungpa's lineage, and has been preserved in what is also known as the Surmang Nyengyu (zur mang snyan brgyud) from the name of Surmang monastery in Nangchen, Eastern Tibet, where this tradition had been kept alive. [MR]

Nine Cycles of the Formless (lit. disembodied) Dakini (lus med mkha' 'gro'i skor dgu) were received by Tilopa from the wisdom dakinis at the Gondhala Temple. The teachings were then transmitted to Naropa, and then in part to Marpa, Milarepa and their disciples. Later when Rechungpa went to India he received and brought back to Tibet the entire cycle, which henceforth became part of Rechungpa's lineage. This cycle also became known as the Surmang Nyengyu (zur mang snyan brgyud) from the name of Surmang Monastery in Nangchen, Eastern Tibet, where its tradition has been kept alive. See DZ, vol. 8, and NG, p. 305. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Nine dhyanas of absorption (snyoms 'jug gi bsam gtan dgu). The four dhyanas, the four formless states, and the shravaka's samadhi of peace. [RY]

Nine Glorious Ones (dpal dgu) [LW1] [RY]

Nine Glorious Ones (dpal dgu); expl. [LWx] [RY]


nine graded vehicles (theg pa rim pa dgu). The three sutric vehicles of the Sravakas, the Pratyekabuddhas and the Bodhisattvas, followed by the six vehicles of Kriya, Upa, Yoga, Mahayoga, Anuyoga, and Atiyoga tantras. They can also be grouped into three vehicles, Hinayana which comprises the first two, Mahayana the third, and Vajrayana the last six. For explanations of their approaches, similarities and differences, see Appendix 1. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Nine gradual vehicles (theg pa rim pa dgu). Shravaka, Pratyekabuddha, Bodhisattva, Kriya, Upa, Yoga, Maha, Anu, and Ati. [RY]

Nine Gradual Vehicles (theg pa rim pa dgu). Shravaka, Pratyekabuddha, Bodhisattva, Kriya, Upa, Yoga, Mahayoga, Anu Yoga, and Ati Yoga. The first two are Hinayana; the third is Mahayana; the next three are the Three Outer Tantras; and the last three are called the Three Inner Tantras. [AL] [RY]

Nine kinds of shastras; (bstan bcos dgu) ‘’’1’’’) don dang ldan pa'i -, 2) don log pa'i -, 3) thos pa lhur len pa'i -, 4)don med pa'i -, 5) rtsos pa lhur len pa'i -, ‘’’6’’’) sgrub pa lhur len pa'i -, 7) ngan g.yo'i -, 8) brtse ba dang bral ba'i -, 9) sdug bsngal 'byin pa'i - (= ngan song dang ngan 'gro'i sdug bsngal 'bying par byed pa'i -),, Out of these six are to be discarded and three are valid (1, 6, and 10) [MR]

Nine Lineages (brgyud pa dgu) See 'three lineages' and the 'six lineages.' [RY]

nine means of mental stillness (sems gnas pa'i thabs dgu) [LW1] [RY]

Nine Mountain School - Collective name for the Korean Ch 'an or Son schools established beginning in the seventh century. [Tarthang]

Nine Mountain School - Collective name for the Korean Ch'an or Son schools established beginning in the seventh century [RY]

Nine peaceful expressions (zhi ba'i nyams dgu). The nine qualities of the body, speech and mind of a peaceful deity. [RY]

Nine regions of Tibet and Kham (bod khams gling dgu): The Regions of Jewel Light (rin chen 'od kyi gling) are the three upper districts (stod khams gsum) between the slate and snow mountains which are governed by elephants and deer. The Regions of Four Sogdian Areas (ru bzhi sog pa'i gling) are the three middle districts (bar khams gsum) between rock and meadow mountains which are governed by rock demons and monkeys. The Regions of Peacocks Below (rma bya 'og gling) are the three lower districts (smad khams gsum) between the jungles and forests which are governed by birds and rakshas. At this time there were no human beings. But here, "the center of the nine regions" is defined as being Samye in the center surrounded by the four cardinal and four intermediate directions of Tibet and Kham, altogether nine. This is the view of Jamyang Khyentse as has been told by Jamdrak. [RY]

nine regions of Tibet and Kham (bod khams gling dgu); listing [LW1] [RY]

Nine Root Tantras (rtsa ba'i rgyud dgu). The most important Mahayoga tantras of the Sadhana Section (sgrub sde). Listed in Chapter 19. [ZL] [RY]

Nine Sadhana Sections (sgrub pa sde dgu). The Eight Sadhana Teachings in addition to the teachings connected to Guru Vidyadhara. Sometimes the Assemblage of Sugatas is counted as the ninth. [ZL] [RY]

nine serene states of successive abiding (mthar gyis gnas pa'i snyoms 'jug dgu): From Gongpa Sangtal: There are the four dhyana states of serenity for discarding the thought of desire. The first dhyana is to be free from the conceptual thinking of perceiver and perceived but still be involved in discerning an object and act of meditation. The second dhyana is to be free from conceptual thinking and discernment but still be involved in fixating on savoring the taste of the samadhi of joy. The third dhyana is unmoving mind but with inhalation and exhalation. The samadhi of the fourth dhyana is being totally free from conceptual thinking with unobstructrd clear perception. [267] There are the four formless states of serenity to discard the conceptual thinking of the realm of form. Dwelling on the thought 'all phenomena are like space!' you stray into the (perception-sphere of) Infinite Space. Dwelling on the thought 'consciousness is infinite and directionless!' you stray into Infinite Consciousness. Dwelling on the thought 'the clear cognizance of perception is not present, not absent, and cannot be made an object of the intellect!' you stray into Neither Presence Nor Absence. Dwelling on the thought 'this mind does not consist of any entity whatsoever; it is nonexistent and empty!' you stray into the perception-sphere of Nothing Whatsoever. These states possess the slight defilement of being a conceptualization, a mental fascination, and an experience of dualistic mind. There is the serenity of cessation to discard the concepts of all these states. Analytical cessation is the ceasing within of the six consciousnesses engaging in their objects and the evenly resting in the interruption of the movement of breath and (dualistic) mind. Non-analytical cessation is to arrive at [* gshis kyi / kyis gzhol phyogs]. [268] That is ultimate indifference. Among these nine states of serenity, the four dhyana states are 'the shamatha that produces vipashyana.' Thus the samadhi of these four dhyanas is in harmony with the innate nature and the most eminent among all types of mundane samadhi. [RY]

Nine Serene States of Successive Abiding (mthar gyis gnas pa'i snyoms par 'jug pa dgu). The four dhyanas, the four formless states, and the shravaka's samadhi of peace, also known as the serenity of cessation.[AL] [RY]

nine stages of the path of cultivation (sgom lam gyi sa dgu) [LW1] [RY]

Nine vehicles (theg pa dgu). The nine gradual vehicles: Shravaka, Pratyekabuddha, Bodhisattva, Kriya, Upa, Yoga, Maha, Anu, and Ati. [RY]

Nine Yanas (theg pa dgu). The nine gradual vehicles: Shravaka, pratyekabuddha, bodhisattva, kriya, charya, yoga, maha, anu, and ati. [RY]

ninth level of enlightenment. The ninth level: sadhumati. (legs pa'i blo gros) "Excellent Intelligence". [Peter Roberts]

Nirmanakaya - An aspect or 'embodiment' of the Buddha, associated with the historical manifestation of the Buddha [RY]

Nirmanakaya - see Three Kayas. [RY]

Nirmanakaya (sprul (pa'i) sku). Emanation Body of a Buddha, [RY]

Nirmanakaya (sprul sku). 'Emanation body,' 'form of magical apparition.' The third of the three kayas. The aspect of enlightenment that can be perceived by ordinary beings. [Bardo Guide 91] [ZL] [RY]

Nirmanakaya (sprul sku). 'Emanation body,' 'form of magical apparition.' The third of the three kayas. The aspect of enlightenment that can be perceived by ordinary beings. [AL] [RY] Nirmanakaya (sprul sku). See 'three kayas'.[Primer] [RY] nirmanakaya (sprul sku). See also three kayas; realms; retinue; semi apparent; syllables; teachings; treasure letters; two types of; wisdom; yidams [LW1] [RY]

Nirmanakaya {sprul pa'i sku}. Body of manifestation. The aspect of Buddhahood which manifests out of compassion to help ordinary beings. [RY]

Nirmanakaya master (slob dpon sprul pa'i sku). A respectful way of addressing Guru Rinpoche showing that he is a manifestation of an enlightened being. [RY]

Nirmanakaya of Uddiyana (o rgyan sprul pa'i sku). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Nirmanakaya Padmakara (sprul sku pad ma 'byung gnas). Same as Guru Rinpoche. [RY]

Nirmanakaya Padmasambhava (sprul sku pad ma 'byung gnas). Same as Guru Rinpoche. A respectful way of addressing Guru Rinpoche showing that he is a manifestation of an enlightened being. [ZL] [RY]

nirmanakaya realms; semi-apparent natural; [LWx] [RY]

Nirmanakaya who tames beings ('gro 'dul spul sku) [RY]

nirmanakaya; semi-apparent, expl.; two types of [LWx] [RY]

Nirvana - (mya ngan med pa) lit. 'blowing out'; extinguishing of the emotional fetters; the unconditioned state free from birth and death. [RY]

Nirvana - The extinction of samsara [RY]

Nirvana (mya ngan (las) 'das (pa), in compounds zhi). The cessation of everything samsaric such as ignorance and suffering, the Liberation of an Arhant or a Buddha. Hinayana Nirvana is supremely blissful but unhelpful to others, and the Arhant must eventually abandon that self-absorbed state and enter the Mahayana. 'Nirvana' is also used for the passing away of a buddha (and sometimes for that of other, presumably saintly persons), 'the N.' being the passing of 'the Buddha', Shakyamuni; when we ask buddhas not to enter N., they are of course in N. already in one sense, but we want them to continue manifesting themselves, not to pass away. [RY]

Nirvana (mya ngan las 'das pa). The extinguishing of the causes for samsaric existence. The lesser nirvana refers to the liberation from cyclic existence attained by a Hinayana practitioner. When referring to a buddha, 'nirvana' is the great non-dwelling state of enlightenment which falls neither into the extreme of samsaric existence nor into the passive state of cessation attained by an arhant. [ZL] [RY]

Nirvana Sutra (mdo myang 'das) [LW1] [RY]

Nirvana Sutra (mdo myang 'das); quotation from [LWx] [RY]

Nirvana Sutra (myang 'das kyi mdo). [ZL] [RY]

N continued - N1


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 12:55, 12 August 2008 (EDT)