T continued - T6

From Rangjung Yeshe Wiki - Dharma Dictionnary
Jump to: navigation, search

T

T continued - T continued - T1 - T continued - T2 - T continued - T3 - T continued - T4 - T continued - T5 - T continued - T6


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

-A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z -



Twenty (nyi shu pa) [LW1] [RY]

Twenty defects of bustle ('du rdzi'i skyon gsum). The Sutra Requested by Superior Intention says: "Maitreya, there are twenty defects of bustle. What are these twenty? Maitreya, they are no to have controlled one's body, not to have controlled one's speech, not to have controlled one's mind,to have great desire, to have great hatred, to have great dullness, to be tainted by mundane conversation, to have completely strayed away from supramundane conversation, to associate with people who do not respect the Dharma, to have fully cast away the Dharma, to consequently be harmed by the maras, to associate with people who are careless, to be careless oneself, to be dominated by conception (rtog pa) and discernment (dpyod pa), to completely stray away from great learning, to fail to achieve shamatha and vipashyana, to fail quickly to become brahmacharin, to completely stray away from rejoicing in the Buddha, to completely stray away from rejoicing in the Dharma, to completely stray away from rejoicing in the Sangha. Maitreya, these twenty should be understood as the defects of taking delight in bustle. A bodhisattva after having applied examination will take delight in solitude and never become completely saddened. [RY]

twenty defects of distraction [LW1] [RY]

twenty subsidiary disturbances [LW1] [RY]

Twenty Thousand (nyi khri) [LW1] [RY]

Twenty Thousand [verses of Prajnaparamita]. (nyi khri) [RY]

Twenty Verses; Vimshatika-karika; (nyi shu pa'i rab tu byed pa); Vasubandhu, 4th or 5th century. [PK] [RY]

twenty-eight ishvaris [LW1] [RY]

Twenty-eight shvari goddesses (dbang phyug ma nyer brgyad). Wrathful emanations of the four female gate keepers among the 42 peaceful deities in the mandala of Magical Net; seven for each of the four activities. [ZL] [RY]

Twenty-five disciples. [RY]

Twenty-five great sacred places. [RY]

Twenty-five Main Disciples of Padmasambhava (rje 'bangs nyer lnga)- in various lists these include Vairotsana; Mandarava; Ye shes mTsho rgyal; rGyal ba mchog dbyangs; Nam mkha'i snying po;dPal gyi seng ge; ye shes dbyangs; Ye shes sde; dPal gyi rdo rje; Khri srong lde'u btsan; mKhar chen dpal gyi *dbang phyug; gYu sgra snying po; dPal gyi seng ge; rMa rin chen mchog; Sangs rgyas ye shes; rdo rje bdud 'joms; rGyal ba blo gros; lDan ma rtse mang; sKa ba dPal brtsegs; 'O bran dbang phyug; Jnanakumaravajra; Sog po lHa dpal gzhon nu; Lang gro dKon mchog 'byung gnas; rGal ba byang chub; Dran pa nam mkha' dbang phyug; Khye'u chung mKha' lding; Cog ru Klu'i rgyal mtshan; Ting nge 'dzin bzang po. [RY]

Twenty-five Panditas (mkhas pa nyer lnga). 25 masters in the Dzogchen lineage from Garab Dorje to Guru Rinpoche, Vimalamitra and Vairocana who brought these teachings to Tibet. [RY]

twenty-five qualities of fruition; listing of [LW1] [RY]

Twenty-five tantras (rgyud nyi shu rtsa lnga). Dzogchen tantras belonging to the Mind Section and possibly also the Space Section, taught by Shri Singha to Vairotsana and Lekdrub. Listed in Chapter Fourteen. [ZL] [RY]

Twenty-five Tantras of the Great Perfection (rdzogs chen kyi rgyud nyi shu rtsa lnga). twenty-five tantras, belonging to the Mind Section and possibly also the Space Section, taught by Shri Singha to Vairochana. Listed in Chapter 14. [ZL] [RY]

twenty-four great sacred places (gnas chen nyer gzhi). According to the Hevajra Tantra (see Snellgrove, 1959, 1:70) these are: Jalandhara, Oddiyana, Paurnagiri, Kamarupa, Malaya, Sindhu, Nagara, Munmuni, Karunyapataka, Devikota, Karmarapataka, Kulata, Arbuta, Godavari, Himadri, Harikela, Lampaka, Kani, Saurasta, Kalinga, Kokana, Caritra, Kosala, and Vindhyakaumarapaurika. Other sources, such as the sadhana (sgrub thabs) of the Queen of Great Bliss (yum bka' bde chen rgyal mo) from the Longchen Nyingthig (see Tulku Thondup, 1985), give a different enumeration of these twenty-four sacred places. They abide on the vajra-body inherent in every sentient being, which is symbolized here by the body of Vajrayogini. These twenty-four are divided in three groups: a) Eight celestial abodes (Skt. khagacharya, Tib. mkha' spyod): 1) The crown of the head is Jalandhara, 2) in between the eyebrows is Pulliramalaya, 3) the nape is Arbuta, 4) the urna (the hair at the center of the forehead) is Rameshvara, 5) the right ear is Oddiyana, 6) the left ear is Godavari, 7) the eyes are Devikota, and 8) the shoulders are Malava. b) Eight earthly abodes (Skt. gocharya, Tib. sa spyod): 9) the throat is Lampaka, 10) the underarms and kidneys are Kamarupa, 11) the two breasts are Odra, 12) the navel is Trishanku, 13) the nose-tip is Koshala, 14) the palate is Kalinga, 15) the heart is both Kanchika and 16) Himalaya (Himavat). c) Eight underground abodes (Skt. bhugarbha, Tib. sa 'og gi gnas brgyad), 17) the genitals are Pretapuri, 18) the anus is Grihadeva, 19) the thumbs and big toes are Maru, 20) the thighs are Saurashtra, 21) the calves are Suvarnadvipa, 22) the sixteen other fingers and toes are Nagara, 23) the knees are Kulata, and 24) the ankles are Sindhu. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Twenty-four Great Tantras of the Mental Class

twenty-four major places (gnas chen nyer bzhi) [LW1] [RY]

Twenty-one Adepts (mkhas pa nyer gcig). Masters of the Mind Section and Space Section of Dzogchen. [RY]

Twenty-one Chogdungs (cog brdung nyi shu rtsa gcig). [ZL] [RY]

Twenty-one Genyen (dge bsnyen nyi shu rtsa gcig). A group of powerful spirits indigenous to Tibet. They were converted by Padmasambhava are commanded to serve Buddhism. Today, they are still called upon along with Nyenchen Tanglha and Machen Pomra during Vajrayana rituals in order to guard the doctrine of the Buddha, elevate the status of the Precious Ones, expand the community of the Sangha, increase the life and splendor of the practitioners, raise the banner of fame, blow the conch of renown, and increase our following and prosperity. [ZL] [RY]

Twenty-one Male and Female Yakshas (gnod sbyin pho mo nyi shu rtsa gcig). [ZL] [RY]

Twenty-one Mother Deities (ma mo nyi shu rtsa gcig). [ZL] [RY]

twice-born - Birds are said to be "twice-born," because they are "born" first in an egg and then a second time from the egg. Similarly, religious practitioners are "twice-born," having had both bodily and spiritual births. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Twin Buddhas (sangs rgyas kyi zhal skyin mched) [LW1] [RY]

Twin Buddhas (sangs rgyas kyi zhal skyin mched) means the representatives of the Buddha; the two Jowo Shakyamuni statues in Lhasa. [RY]

Two accumulations (tshogs gnyis). The accumulation of merit and of wisdom. [RY]

Two accumulations (tshogs gnyis). The accumulation of merit with concepts and the accumulation of wisdom beyond concepts. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

TWO ACCUMULATIONS (tshogs gnyis). The accumulation of merit with concepts and the accumulation of wisdom beyond concepts. [AL] [RY]

two accumulations (tshogs gnyis). The accumulations of merit (bsod nams) and wisdom (ye shes), which lead to the realization of the two bodies or kayas of a Buddha. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

two accumulations [LW1] [RY]

two accumulations of merit and wisdom (bsod nams and ye shes kyi tshogs) lead respectively to the realization of the two kayas, the dharmakaya (chos sku, absolute body) and the rupakaya (gzugs sku, manifested body) of a Buddha. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Two accumulations of merit and wisdom (bsod nams dang ye shes kyi tshogs). [RY]

two benefits (don gnyis). The present and ultimate benefit of self and others. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

two bodies or kayas (sku gnyis). The dharmakaya (chos kyi sku), or absolute body, and the rupakaya (gzugs kyi sku), or body of form. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Two Chariots (shing rta gnyis); listing; of bodhisattva precepts [LW1] [RY]

two congregations of the Sangha (dge bdun gyi sde gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

two crowned buddhas (jo bo rnam gnyis). The Jowo Rinpoche (jo bo rin po che), or Jowo Sakyamuni, which is in the Jokhang, the main temple of Lhasa (also known as ra sa 'phrul snang gtsug lag khang); and the Jowo Mikyö Dorje (jo bo mi bskyod rdo rje), which is kept in the temple of Ramoche (ra mo che). These statues, the most venerated in Tibet, were brought to Lhasa by the two wives of Songtsen Gampo, the Nepalese princess Bhrikuti (Tib. lha gcig khri btsun), who founded the Jokhang, and the Chinese princess Wengchen Kungchu, who founded Ramoche. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Two Jamgöns. [RY]

Two kayas (sku gnyis). Dharmakaya and Rupakaya. [RY]

Two kayas (sku gnyis). Dharmakaya realized for the benefit of self and rupakaya manifested for the welfare of others. [RY]

two kayas [LW1] [RY]

two kinds of self-entity (bdag gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

two obscurations (sgrib gnyis). The obscuration of disturbing emotions and the cognitive obscuration. [AL] [RY]

two obscurations; listing of [LW1] [RY]

Two profound stages (zab mo'i rim pa gnyis). The development stage and the completion stage. [RY]

Two rupakayas (gzugs sku gnyis). Sambhogakaya and nirmanakaya. [RY]

Two sections of the sangha (sde gnyis). Refers to monks and ngakpas. [RY]

Two Segments (brtag gnyis), the king of the Sarma Tantras, [RY]

Two Segments (brtag gnyis). The condensed version of the Hevajra Tantra.[EMP] [RY]

Two Segments (brtags pa gnyis pa) [LW1] [RY]

Two stages (rim gnyis). See 'development stage' and 'completion stage.' [ZL] [RY]

Two stages (rim gnyis). The development stage (bskyed rim) during which one visualizes deities and recites their mantras, followed by the completion stage (rdzogs rim), with or without formal representations. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

two stages. See development and completion [LW1] [RY]

two supreme ones (mchog gnyis). Nagarjuna and Asanga, two among the Six Ornaments of the World. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Two supreme shravakas (nyan thos mchog gnyis). Shariputra and Maudgalaputra. Two close disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni. [RY]

Two Truths (bden gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

two truths (bden pa gnyis). Absolute truth and relative truth. Absolute truth (don dam bden pa) is beyond concepts and definitions. Relative truth (kun rdzob bden pa) is considered as deceptive and devoid of any true existence; or, according to the Mantrayana, as the display of innate wisdom, the infinite purity of all phenomena. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

Two truths (bden pa gnyis). Relative truth and ultimate truth. Relative truth describes the seeming, superficial and apparent mode of all things. Ultimate truth describes the real, true and unmistaken mode. These two aspects of reality are defined by the Four Philosophical Schools as well as the tantras of Vajrayana in different ways, each progressively deeper and closer to describing things as they are. [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

TWO TRUTHS (bden pa gnyis). Relative truth and ultimate truth. Relative truth describes the seeming, superficial and apparent mode of all things. Ultimate truth describes the real, true and unmistaken mode. These two aspects of reality are defined by the Four Philosophical Schools as well as the tantras of Vajrayana in different ways, each progressively deeper and closer to describing things as they are. [AL] [RY]

two truths; definition [LW1] [RY]

two types of potential (rigs gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

two types of potential (rigs gnyis); explanation in terms of ground, path and fruition [LWx] [RY]

two vehicles; causal and resultant [LW1] [RY]

two veils (sgrib gnyis) which prevent one from achieving enlightenment are the veil created by the obscuring emotions, and the veil masking ultimate knowledge. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

two veils (sgrib gnyis). The veil created by the obscuring emotions (nyon mongs pa'i sgrib), and the veil masking ultimate knowledge (shes bya'i sgrib). They prevent one from achieving enlightenment. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

two waters and the five enjoyments. The "two waters and five enjoyments" are the usual shrine offerings of bowls, two containing water (one for the mouth and one for the feet), and the five enjoyments are flowers, incense, light, scent and food. The light is usually a metal oil-lamp without a bowl, and an extra bowl is added sometimes to represent flowers as a boundary marker, though Thrangu Rinpoche says that is not necessary here. This extra bowl is often misinterpreted as being the music offering, while in fact the actual musical instruments that one plays fulfill that purpose. [Peter Roberts]

twofold egolessness [LW1] [RY]

Twofold knowledge (mkhyen pa gnyis). The wisdom of knowing the nature as it is and the wisdom of perceiving all that exists. Knowledge of conventional and ultimate phenomena. [RY] twofold purity (dag pa gnyis) [LW1] [RY]

Twofold purity (dag pa gnyis). Inherent or primordial purity and the purity of having removed all temporary obscurations. [RY]

Twofold selflessness (bdag med gnyis). The inherent absence of a self-entity in the individual person as well as in all phenomena. [RY]

Twofold siddhis (dngos grub rnam gnyis). See 'supreme and common siddhis.' [RY]

twofold thought of enlightenment (byang chub kyi sems gnyis). Bodhicitta, the thought or mind of enlightenment, is defined as the intention to achieve Buddhahood for the sake of all beings. It has two aspects, relative and absolute. The relative mind of enlightenment (kun rdzob byang chub kyi sems) is itself divided into two steps: the wish to attain ultimate perfection to become able to free all beings from suffering (smon pa'i sems bskyed), and the entry into spiritual practice in order to actualize this wish ('jug pa'i sems bskyed). The absolute mind of enlightenment (don dam byang chub kyi sems) is the realization of emptiness and the recognition that the Buddha-nature abides in every sentient being. [MR-ShabkarNotes]

twofold welfare; listing of [LW1] [RY]


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

Go To:

-A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z -


--Richard 13:21, 12 August 2008 (EDT)