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D continued - D3


The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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Dosher Trelchung (mdo gzher sprel chung). A minister of King Trisong Deutsen; also spelled Dershey Trelchung (sder bzhed sprel chung). [ZL] (RY)

dough triangles. Small dough-triangles (theb kyus) made by squeezing some dough between the tips of the thumb and the index-finger. Each represents an additional torma (gtor ma) offering, so that a great number of tormas can be offered. (Peter Roberts)

downfall, pitfall {ltung ba}. Breaking of precepts. (RY)

Dra Thalgyur Root Tantra (sgra thal 'gyur rtsa ba'i rgyud). This tantra explains how to attain the level of nirmanakaya and how to accomplish the welfare of others through practices related to sound. (RY)

Drag Yangdzong (bsgrags kyi yang rdzong). See also 'Crystal Cave of Drag Yangdzong' and Ü and Tsang. ZL (RY)

Dragon Orient 08.jpg
Dragon ('brug). Sanskrit naga(s). A mythical snake like being, usually said to be living in the oceans. Dragons are believed to have miraculous powers and to cause rain to fall in the world. (RY)

Drak Yangdzong (sgrags yang rdzong), see chap.10, pg. 272, note 59, in The Life of Shabkar. (MR) See also Ü and Tsang and Eight Classes of Herukas.

Drak Yerpa (brag yer pa) - This is the holy place of Guru Padmasambhava related to the speech aspect. It is also said to be the "life tree" (srog shing), or spiritual axis, of Lhasa. There are over eighty caves where many great beings from all lineages meditated. On the top are the cave of Guru Padmasambhava, the Rock that is Hard to Reach (brag gi yang bgrod dka'), and Yeshe Tsogyal's Secret Cave (gsang phug). Below is the Moon Cave (zla ba phug), another cave of Guru Padmasambhava; the Dharma King's Cave (chos rgyal phug), King Songtsen Gampo's cave; the great cave where the eighty siddhas of Yerpa (i.e., Guru Padmasambhava's disciples) meditated together; and Lord Atisha's cave, the Cave of Auspicious Coincidence (rten 'brel phug), thus named because when Atisha entered it, a rain of flowers fell. See Gegyepa Tendzin Dorje (1988) and Keith Dowman (1988, hereafter abbreviated as PP). In some enumerations, instead of Drak Yangdzong (see chap.10, pg. 272, note 59, in The Life of Shabkar), Drak Yerpa is given as the holy place related to the body aspect of Guru Rinpoche. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drakar Dzongchung. (RY)

Drakmar Yama Lung, see chap.10, pg. 272, note 59. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drakpa Gyaltsen (grags pa rgyal mtshan). Tibetan master of the Sakya Lineage and close disciple of Sakya Pandita. [RY]

Drakpa Senge (grags pa seng ge), Shamar I): 1283-1349 or 1350 [MR]

Drampa Gyang; (gram pa rgyangs) One of the twelve missionary temples (mtha' 'dul gtsug lag khang) built in the 7th century by King Songtsen Gampo. Nearby was the Gyang Bumoche, an immense Trashi Gomang Stupa (many-doored stupa) build by Thangthong Gyalpo and the Sakya master Sönam Tashi/Sonam Tashi (1352-1412). Nearby is a small valley with Gyang Lompo Lhung, a cave blessed by Guru Rinpoche. (MR)

Drampa Lhatse; (gram pa lha rtse). (RY)

drawing in of the life-forces. (tshe 'gugs). (Peter Roberts)

Dream (rmi lam). Here specifically referring to one of the Six Doctrines of Naropa. (RY)

Drekpa (dregs pa). A certain type of malevolent spirit. [RY]

Dremo Valley ('bras mo ljong) (LW1) (RY)

Dremong (dred mong), the Brown Bear or Snow Bear - (Lat. Ursus isabellinus), of which Tibetans distinguish two kinds: the dangerous steppe dweller (byang dred), and the forest dweller (nags dred), smaller in size, which does not attack humans unless provoked. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drenka (bran ka). Tibetan translator predicted by Padmasambhava. ZL (RY)

Drenpa Namkha (dran pa nam mkha'). Tibetan translator and disciple of Padmasambhava. At first he was an influential Bönpo priest, but later he studied with Padmasambhava and also learned translation. Due to his miraculous power, he is said to have tamed a wild yak simply by a threatening gesture. He offered numerous Bön teachings to Padmasambhava who then concealed them as a terma treasure. Drenpa Namkha means 'Space of Mindfulness.' [ZL] [RY]

Drepung ('bras spungs) was founded in 1416 by Jamyang Chöje ('jam dbyangs chos rje), Sera (se ra) was founded in 1419 by Jamchen Chöje (byams chen chos rje), and Ganden (dga' ldan) in 1409 by Je Tsongkhapa (rje tsong kha pa). (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drey (bre). Tibetan volume measure equivalent of about one liter or two pints. One drey of gold would weighs about 13 kilos. ZL (RY)

Drib (grib). Defilement, obscuration caused by contact with impure people or their things.[AL] [RY]

Drichu [LW1] [RY]

Drigom Shigpo: 1208- [MR]

Drigung Chotrak (chos kyi grags pa): 17th C. (MR) Also: Drigung Chötrak ('dri gung rig 'dzin chos kyi grags pa), 17th century. (RY)

Drigung Chung Tsang VI, (bstan 'dzin chos kyi blo gros): 1868- [MR]

Drigung Father and Son are the senior and the junior incarnates of Drigung Monastery, Drigung Chetsang (che tshang) and Chungtsang (chung tshang). The former was here Drigung Kyabgön Tendzin Padma Gyaltsen ('bri gung skyabs mgon bstan 'dzin pad ma rgyal mtshan, born in 1770), the twenty-seventh hierarch of Drigung and the reincarnation of Jigten Gonpo ('jig rten mgon po, 1143-1217). The latter was the reincarnation of Drigung Rigdzin Chökyi Trakpa ('bri gung chung tshang rig 'dzin chos kyi grags pa, 1597-1659). See Tendzin Pemai Gyaltsen's Account of the Various Masters of the 'bri gung bka' brgyud pa School. About their authority over Lapchi, see LNY and chap.11, pgs. 342-343, note 10 in (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drigung Jigten Gonpo ('jigs rten mgon po) - Rinchen Pal, Shedang Dorje (zhe sdang rdo rje) or Drigung Kyopa(1143-1212 or 1217), a (Disciple of) Phagmo Drupa)(1110-1170) who was an highly accomplished siddha who founded the Drigung monastery and Drigung school. (MR)

Drigung Konchog Rinchen (dkon mchog rin chen):1590- [MR]

Drigung Rinchen Phuntsok (also known as gnam lcags me 'bar) :1509-1557. (RY)

Drikung Kagyu. (RY)

Drikung Kyobpa (bri gung skyob pa). A great master of the Drigung Kagyu lineage. (1143-1217) [RY]

Drilbupa (dril bu pa) or Vajraghantapada, one of the eighty-four Mahasiddhas of India. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drimey Dashar (dri med brda shar). Also Bende Drimey Dashar, one of the chief disciples of Guru Rinpoche. Same as Jnanakumara of Nyag. (RY)

Drimey Shingkyong Gonpo. [RY]

Drin Chubar (brin chu dbar) is a village and monastery near the junction of the Rongshar (rong shar, formerly known as brin) and the Manglung (smang lung) rivers, to the east of Lapchi. See MI, p.185. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Droding. Daki (RY)

Drodul Chokgyur Dechen Lingpa ('gro 'dul mchog gyur bde chen gling pa). Same as Chokgyur Lingpa. (RY)

Drogmi Lotsawa ('brog mi lo tsa ba) - Student of Prajna Indraruci and Gayadhara and founder of the sa skya school of Tibetan Buddhism. (RY)

Drogmi Lotsawa (brog mi lo tsa ba, 993-1050), who brought to Tibet the Path and Fruit (lam 'bras) teachings of the Sakya tradition. Tertön Dudul Dorje (gter ston bdud 'dul rdo rje, 1615-73), a great visionary master of Kathok Monastery in Kham of whom Sonam Nyentrak is a descendant, was also connected with the Sakya tradition. See NS, p. 813-7. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drogmi Lotsawa;, or Drogmi Palkyi Yeshe ('brog mi dpal gyi ye shes), one of the nine spiritual heart-sons of Guru Padmasambhava. He attained enlightenment through the practice of Mamo Bötong / Mamo Botong (ma mo rbod gtong), one of the eight main herukas of the Nyingma tradition. (MR)

Drogon Rechenpa (Sangye Rechen): 1088-1158. (RY)

Drom Tonpa {brom ston pa} (1004-1064). Name of Drom Gyalwai Jungne, one of Atisha's three main disciples. (RY)

Drom Tönpa; Gyalwai Jungne (sbrom ston pa rgyal ba'i 'byung gnas): (1004-1064) (MR)

Drom Tönpa; Gyalwai Jungne (sbrom ston pa rgyal ba'i 'byung gnas), (1004-1064), the closest Tibetan disciple of Lord Atisha; with whom he remained for eighteen years. He founded the monastery of Radreng (rwa sgreng) where he remained and taught for seven years before passing away at the age of 60. (MR)

Droma land of Kyi (skyid kyi gro ma lung) (LW1 - RY)

Dromton ('brom ston) - Student of Atisha and principal systematizer of the Tibetan bka' gdams pa school; founder of rva sgreng monastery. (RY)

Drong ('brong, Lat. Bos grunniens linnaeus), a very large species of wild yak. Solitary males that have left the herd are considered very dangerous. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drongjug (grong 'jug). The practice of transferring one's consciousness into another body. The transmission of this teaching died out when Marpa's son, Darma Dode, passed away. (RY)

Drop of Amrita: probably the bdud rtsi'i thig pa'i rtsa tshig of Lodrak Drupchen. See note 61. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drop of Gold Heart Advice (snying gtam gser gyi thig pa), is the name given to this advice on Bodhicitta. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Drops of Nectar - A detailed and scholarly exposition of the 1st Chapter of the Bodhisattva-caryavatara by Khenpo Kunpal, himself a direct disciple of Patrul Rinpoche. (RWB)

Drophugpa, Zur Shakya Senge: (1074-1135) (MR)

Drowa Kundul. [Daki] (RY)

Dru Jamyang Drakpa. A close disciple of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and a very learned master. (RY)

Dru Jamyang Drakpa. See Jamyang Drakpa. (LW1 - (RY)

Drubchen ceremony (sgrub chen). Great accomplishment practice; a sadhana practice undertaken by a group of people which goes on uninterruptedly for seven days. [AL] (RY)

Drubchen. [Daki] (RY)

Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche (19th century/1849-1904) A great master of the Nangchen province in East Tibet. His two main gurus were Chogyal Dorje, a yogi who could fly, and Chokgyur Lingpa. Under his supervision were more than 500 nunneries. [Incorrect: dates (1789-1844) (MR) - from Earth Bird to Wood Dragon] [Gene Smith: 1828-?]. (RY)

Drukchen Rinpoche. (RY)

Drukchen VII, Trinley Shingta: (1718-1755). (MR)

Drukpa Kagyu school ('brug pa bka' brgyud). The Kagyu teachings transmitted from Gampopa through Phagmo Drubpa to Lingje Repa. (RY)

Drukpa Kunleg ('brugs pa kun legs): (1455-1529). (MR)

Drupthob Orgyenpa, Rinchen Pal (1230-1309). A disciple of Gyalwa Götsangpa; (1189-1258) and the second Karmapa: Karma Pakshi; (1204-1283). He travelled upto he holy land of Urgyen (Oddiyana) where he had a vision of Vajra Varahi who transmitted him the direct lineage of the Three Vajra Yogas, the transmission of which became known as the Urgyen Nyengyu. He travelled all over from Shri Lanka to China. Teacher of Gyalwa Yangonpa. (MR)

Drupthob Shakya Shri: (1853- ). (MR)

Drupthob Urgyenpa: (1230-1309). (RY)

Dualistic fixation (gnyis 'dzin). Experience structured as 'perceiver' and 'object perceived.' (RY)

Dualistic knowledge (gnyis snang gi shes pa). Experience structured as 'perceiver' and 'object perceived.' [Bardo Guide 91] [RY]

Dualistic phenomena (gnyis snang). Experience structured as 'perceiver' and 'object perceived.' (RY)

Dudjom Rinpoche (1904-1987) The incarnation of the great treasure revealer Dudjom Lingpa. His Holiness was the supreme head of the Nyingma lineage after exile from Tibet. He is regarded as one of the most prominent scholars of our time. (RY)

Dudjom Rinpoche (bdud 'joms rin po che). A great modern day master and tertön of the Nyingma lineage. (RY)

Dudul Dorje, Kamarpa XIII: (1733-1797). (RY)

Dudul Dorje: (1615-1673). (RY)

Dudul Karma Guru (bdud 'dul karma gu ru) is the name of a wrathful form of Guru Padmasambhava, particularly in the terma (See RT, vol 12, Na) revealed by Karma Guru Tashi Topgyal Wangpö Deh (karma gu ru bkra shis stobs rgyal dbang po'i sde (1550-1603), better known as Changdak Tashi Topgyal (byang bdag bkra shis stobs rgyal). Chögyal Ngakyi Wangpo himself is also referred to as Karma Guru, in WL for instance. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Dudul Nuden Dorje. (RY)

Dujom Lingpa : (1835-1903). (bdud 'joms gling pa). (RY)

Dukyi Shechen (bdud kyi gshed chen). One of 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. (RY)

dulled (khams bsdus). "the elements gathered inwards". (Peter Roberts)

Dundul Dorje (bdud 'dul rdo rje); Vidyadhara Dundul Dorje; (1615-1672) to whom Rigdzin Jatsön Nyingpo principally transmitted the Könchok Chidu teachings. (Peter Roberts)

Dungtso Repa (dung mtsho ras pa) opened the sacred place of Tsari: 1314. (RY)

Dungtso Repa, the first, (dung mtsho ras pa) opened the sacred place of Tsari: 1314. (MR)

Dungtso Repa, First (dung mtsho ras pa): 14- (MR)

Dungtso Repa, Second (dung mtsho ras pa): 14- (MR)

Düpado ('dus pa'i mdo). The main scripture of Anu Yoga. Consists of 75 chapters and is also known as Do Gongpa Düpa (mdo dgongs pa 'dus pa) or Kündü Rigpey Do (kun 'dus rig pa'i mdo). [EMP] (RY)

Dupedo, Gyutrul and Semd. ('dus pa'i mdo sgyu 'phrul sems sde) - Dupedo is the main scripture of Anu Yoga. Gyutrul is the main Maha Yoga tantra. Semde is the Mind Section of Dzogchen Ati Yoga and in this context includes the other two sections: Longde (klong sde), the Space Section, and Men-ngag De (man ngag sde), the Instruction Section. (RY)

Düpo Yabje Nagpo (bdud po yab rje nag po). [ZL] (RY)

dur kha - According to Trulshik Rinpoche, dur kha refers to Upper or Outer Mongolia (stod sog) and mu dur kha to Lower or Inner Mongolia (smad sog). This could also very well refer to Turkey. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Durtro Lhamo. (RY)

Dusum Khyenpa (dus gsum mkhyen pa) (1110-1193). (MR)

Düsum Khyenpa, the first Karmapa (1110-1193). One of the main disciples of Gampopa.Primer (RY)

Dusum Sangye (dus gsum sangs rgyas). See 'Buddhas of the Three Times.' (RY)

Dusum Sangye prayer. (LW1 - RY)

Duton. (RY)

Dza Chukha. (LW1 - RY)

Dza Trulshik Rinpoche, Kunzang Trinley Drodul Tsel (kun bzang phrin las 'dro 'dul rtsal) or Ngawang Chökyi Lodrö (ngag dbang chos kyi blo gros), born in 1924. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Dzachu (LW1 - RY)

Dzamling Gyenchok ('dzam gling rgyan mchog). One of the 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. (RY)

Dzatrul Ngawang Tendzin Norbu (dza sprul ngag dbang bstan 'dzin nor bu): (1867- ). (MR)

dzi sha, the large duodenum of ruminants. According to one informant, it could be the same as dzi mo, a "delicacy" prepared by stuffing empty lungs with choice pieces of meat cooked in butter. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Dzigar Kongtrül Rinpoche. (LW1 - RY)

Dzigar Kongtrül Rinpoche was born in the Northern Indian province of Himachel Pradesh to Tibetan parents and grew up in a monastic environment. Recognized as an incarnation of Jamgon Kongtrül Lodro Thaye, he received extensive training in all aspects of Buddhist doctrine. In particular he received the teachings of the Nyingma lineage, especially that of the Longchen Nyingthik from his root teacher, H.H. Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche. Rinpoche also studied extensively under Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche, Nyöshul Khen Rinpoche and the great scholar Khenpo Rinchen. In 1989 Rinpoche moved to the United States with his family and in 1990 began a five-year tenure as a professor of Buddhist philosophy at the Naropa Institute. Rinpoche also founded Mangala Shri Bhuti at this time, an organization established with the vision of furthering the wisdom and practice of the Longchen Nyingthik lineage. Later, Rinpoche moved to southern Colorado and established the mountain retreat center, Longchen Jigme Samten Ling. Rinpoche currently spends much of his time there in retreat and guides students in long-term retreat practice. When not in retreat, Rinpoche travels widely throughout the world teaching and furthering his own education. (RY)

Dzogchen (rdzogs pa chen po, rdzogs chen; Skt. mahasandhi, maha ati, Great Perfection). The teachings beyond the vehicles of causation, the highest of the inner tantras of the Nyingma School, first taught in the human world by the great vidyadhara Garab Dorje. Dzogchen is the ultimate of all the 84,000 profound and extensive sections of the Dharma. It is the realization of Buddha Samantabhadra, exactly as it is. The aspects of means and knowledge of Dzogchen are known as Trekchö and Tögal. (RY)

Dzogchen (rdzogs pa chen po, Skt. Mahasandhi). Also known as Great Perfection and Ati Yoga. The highest teachings of the Nyingma School of the Early Translations. In this world the bestknown human lineage masters are Garab Dorje, Manjushrimitra, Shri Singha, Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and Vairochana. Dzogchen has two chief aspects: the lineage of scriptures and the lineage of teachings. In addition, numerous Dzogchen teachings were concealed as treasures (termas) by these masters and revealed through the following centuries. The lineage of teachings is embodied in the oral instructions one receives personally from a qualified master and holder of the Dzogchen lineage. The Bardo Guide (RY)

Dzogchen / rdzogs chen - Atiyoga: the teachings of the highest perfection; the highest of the rnying ma inner Tantras. (RY)

Dzogchen - 1) (rdzogs pa chen po, Skt. mahasandhi). Also known as Great Perfection and Ati Yoga. The highest teachings of the Nyingma School of the Early Translations. In this world the most well known human lineage masters are: Garab Dorje, Manjushrimitra, Shri Singha, Jnanasutra, Vimalamitra, Padmasambhava and Vairochana. Dzogchen has two chief aspects: the lineage of scriptures and the lineage of teachings (dpe brgyud dang bka' brgyud). The scriptures are contained in the tantras of the Three Sections of Dzogchen: Mind Section, Space Section and Instruction Section. The first two were brought to Tibet chiefly by Vairochana while the Instruction Section was mainly transmitted by Vimalamitra and Padmasambhava. In addition, numerous Dzogchen termas were concealed by these masters and revealed through the following centuries. The lineage of teachings is embodied in the oral instructions one receives personally from a qualified master and holder of the Dzogchen lineage. [ZL] [RY]

Dzogchen - 2) The Tibetan historian Guru Tashi Tobgyal elaborates in his Ocean of Wondrous Sayings about Padmasambhava's specific lineage of Dzogchen in the following way: "The great master is of the same nature as the infinite number of buddhas of the three kayas and does therefore not depend upon the concept of linear transmission. He is indivisible from the buddhas and the pure realms of the three kayas. However, in accordance with how other people perceive, Padmasambhava is not only the master of the numberless tantras of Vajrayana but possesses a unique short lineage of mastery over the profound topics of Nyingtig, the Luminous Great Perfection of the definitive meaning, entrusted to him by the three masters Garab Dorje, Manjushrimitra and Shri Singha. In particular, Padmasambhava acted upon a prophesy from Vajra Varahi and then received detailed teachings from Shri Singha. [ZL] (RY)

Dzogchen - 3) In terms of tantric scriptures, there are 6,400,000 tantras of the Great Perfection which can be divided into the Three Sections of Mind, Space, and Instruction. Kunje Gyalpo is the chief tantra of the Mind Section, the Longchen Rabjam Tantra is the chief tantra of the Space Section, and the Dra Thalgyur Root Tantra is the chief tantra of the Instruction Section. (RY)


Dzogchen Aro Lug; (rdzogs chen aro'i lugs): The tradition of the sems sde section of the Great Perfection, Ati Yoga, (the three main sections of Ati Yoga being sems sde, lung sde and man ngag sde). It was transmitted from the Indian Siddha mkha spyod pa (Dhumatala?) to rnam pa snang mdzad, gzhon nu yes shes, and finally to A ro ye shes 'byung gnas;. The root teachings of this tradition can be found in Volume 2 of the gdams ngag mdzod. (MR)

Dzogchen Ati Zabdon Nyingtig. (RY)

Dzogchen Desum. (RY)

[[Dzogchen Gonpa] - built in 1685. (MR)

Dzogchen Kangtro. (RY)

Dzogchen Monastery (LW1 - RY)

Dzogchen Nyingthig. The Heart Essence of the Great Perfection. Specifically the teachings of Dzogchen brought to Tibet by Vimalamitra and Guru Rinpoche as arranged by Longchenpa. (RY)

Dzogchen of the Natural State (gnas lugs rdzogs pa chen po). Same as 'Trekchö,' the view of Cutting Through and identical to 'Essence Mahamudra.' (RY)

Dzogchen Padma Rigdzin (rdzogs chen pad ma rig 'dzin) (1625-1697). (MR)

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

Dzogchen Rinpoche. (RY)

Dzogchen Rudam Sangtro. (RY)

Dzogchen Tantras - In terms of tantric scriptures, there are 6,400,000 tantras of the Great Perfection which can be divided into the Three Sections of Mind, Space, and Instruction. Kunje Gyalpo is the chief tantra of the Mind Section, the Longchen Rabjam Tantra is the chief tantra of the Space Section, and the Dra Thalgyur Root Tantra is the chief tantra of the Instruction Section. (RY)

Dzogchenpa Kunzang Shenphen (rdzogs chen pa kun bzang gzhan phan) the first Do Drupchen, see Translator's Introduction, note 48). thus called because he was a master of the teachings of the Great Perfection (rdzogs chen). (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Dzogpachenpo {rdzog pa chen po}. The Great Perfection, also called Atiyoga. (RY)

Dzomnang. (RY)

Dzomo, the female offspring of a yak and a cow. (MR-ShabkarNotes)

Dzong-Go. (RY)

Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse. See Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö (LW1 - RY)

Dzongsar Khyentse Chokyi Lodro (rdzong gsar mkhyen brtse chos kyi blo gros). One of five reincarnations of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. He was a great master upholding the Rimey (nonsectarian) tradition, as well as being one of the two main root gurus of His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse. His three reincarnations live presently at Bir, Himachal Pradesh; in Dordogne, France; and in Boudhanath, Nepal. Dzongsar means 'New Castle,' Khyentse means 'Loving Wisdom,' and Chökyi Lodrö means 'Intellect of the Dharma.'[AL] (RY)

Dzongsar Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö. (RY)

Dzongsar Khyentse. (RY)

Dzongsar Monastery (LW1 - RY)

Dzongsar. (RY)

Dzongshö - (rdzong shod) (LW1 - RY)

Dzongsho Deshek Dupa. (RY)

Dzutrul Tuchen (rdzu 'phrul mthu chen). One of the 12 manifestations of Guru Rinpoche. (RY)



The Rangjung Yeshe Gilded Palace of Dharmic Activity (Front Cover)

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--Richard 12:28, 12 August 2008 (EDT)